Sins of Omission... Give an example


#1

What would be some examples of hypothetical sins or non-hypothetical sins of omission?


#2

Your child is sick with pneumonia and you did nothing, resulting in her death.

You know someone is stealing money from the company, you’re in a position to report it and put a stop to it, and you don’t.

You absolutely refuse to help the poor.


#3

Not contributing to collections at Church to aid the poor and those we KNOW have nothing when we can do so. NOT helping someone either financially or physically or even just listening when we have the ability to. Not giving of our time, talent, treasure to the Church when we absolutely can. Not be kind even with just a smile or a kind word when we can.


#4

You ignore your parent or child when they ask for your help and you KNOW they need it and you don’t do so.


#5

A smile or kind word should come from the heart. If its not in you its not effective when you do it.

So is one culpable if it isn’t in his heart?


#6

Well good question but it doesn’t cost us anything and it just may save that person at that moment from total despair and making a terrible choice.


#7

Somebody complimented you on your good work, except it was actually your work colleague who did most of it, and you didn’t share the credit, you just smiled and took all the credit yourself without saying anything.


#8

Rolling over and going back to sleep when you know you should get up. Does that count?


#9

EXCELLENT one especially if it is early morning weekday Mass or Adoration or something Extra.


#10

What if you never wanted the credit?

Do we have a duty to correct everyone’s errors?

Every time someone opens their mouth, we have to analyze and correct them?


#11

Okay, where’s this going?


#12

The parable of the good Samaritan. A priest and a levite passed by and did nothing for the injured man.


#13

Neglecting to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, visiting those in prison, consoling the sick and suffering. We will be judged most severely on what we deliberately failed to do for our neighbor.


#14

Only if you’re in Opus Dei.

Which is why I don’t join. I prefer St. Vitus, patron saint of oversleeping.

Anyway I just read a Nat Geo article claiming we’re all sleep-deprived, and taking a nap for anxiety is cheaper and easier than taking a pill.


#15

I don’t often feel like being kind to others, but I try hard to do it anyway. It becomes dangerous territory when the behavior we engage in is weighed primarily by feelings.


#16

Come on, man, it’s pretty clear that staying quiet and taking credit for someone else’s work is wrong, frowned upon by everybody who’s ever had a job, and a sin.

A priest I know preached an entire homily on this last year. He used his own experience from grade school. He took credit for someone else’s art work, thinking he would be praised for it and instead ended up getting punished by his teacher because the picture was a cartoon of another teacher.
Moral of the story was “don’t take credit for stuff you didn’t do” and “don’t tell lies, including lies where you don’t speak at all”.

Anyway - is your point in making this thread to get actual examples, or to just argue that every example people give really isn’t a sin? It’s rather tiresome that you want to argue back about sins. Do you do that in the confessional?


#17

I don’t think its a sin to not correct someone’s errors they make about you when you really don’t care one way or the other.

Some of this stuff is nitpicky.


#18

Sin isn’t about whether you yourself care one way or the other, it’s about whether you broke one of God’s commandments.


#19

It doesn’t have to be a big thing. I often don’t correct strangers when they mispronounce my name (which happens frequently.) I’m not likely to see them ever again and I don’t want them to feel embarrassed.

But if someone told me, “Oh wow, you must have put so many hours in on that project,” and I know I had help or it wasn’t me, yes, it would be right to say, “You know, Susie really deserves the credit,” or even, “It was a team effort.” It’s not false modesty, and it takes all of two seconds to say. If a person moves on to another topic before you get a word in edgewise, that’s one thing. But to let someone lavish praise on you for something you didn’t do, no, that isn’t right, either.


#20

Failing to attend Mass on Sunday when.you are able - surprised no-one has already mentioned it.


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