Sins of omission = mortal sin


#1

Reading Matthew 24.

Did NOT feed poor.
Did NOT clothe naked.
Did NOT give drink to thirsty.
Did NOT visit someone in prison.
Did NOT welcome a stranger.

Result: People going to hell.

This makes it seems that sins of omission are mortal sins.


#2

As we say at Mass:

I confess to almighty God and to you, my brothers and sisters, that I have greatly sinned in my thoughts and in my words, in what I have done and in what I have failed to do,


#3

Not performing corporal acts of mercy are sins. This is true…
But whether they are mortal or not depends on other factors.

Peace
James


#4

People go to Hell because they die in a state of mortal sin. Being in a state of mortal sin while alive does not mean you will go to Hell.


#5

I would tend to agree with you. Pope Francis’ Lenten message refers to the global scourge of indifference, spurred on by selfishness, worldliness and greed. Our failure to perform spiritual and corporal works of mercy to the best of our ability are grave sins of omission. lord have mercy on us.


#6

Sherry,
You speak truly here. They are grave acts of omission. But we must remember that for a sin to be mortal there needs to be two other conditions met.
So it is important - especially for those reading this who struggle with scruples - to use proper terms in a precise manner.

Peace
James


#7

I would never classify sins of omission as mortal as they do not belong to this type of classification. If that was the case we would all be in the same boat. Mortal sins tends to come from what we do not from what we fail to do. To say that I did not feed the poor or clothe them or to give drink to anyone who is thirsty means much more than just lack of doing something. For instance when I was unkind or was not generous would be better to confess. Or when I would not pray for another is who is in need of Grace. There has to be a sin that prevents people to do what Matthew 25 talks about. It is not necessarily sins of omission. You have to find out the sin that connects them with Matthew 25 and it cannot be just sins of omission. It goes deeper. If we lack to do the good it must be something we still need to repent of and here I must point to pride and self-will that is the ultimate sin that we need to repent of. Every sin flows from pride and self-will. I am not saying just to confess your pride and self-will but it is a great start to understand why people will not serve others better than themselves.


#8

Very interesting post…I hadn’t thought of it that way…
I think one of the sins of commission in these things would be greed - of keeping for yourself that which your brother needs and which you do not need.
Such greed need not be monetary.

Still we need to be careful because while such acts might be grave, there are other requirements for a sin to be mortal…Knowledge and deliberate consent of the will.

Peace
James


#9

Mortal sins require grave matter, freedom in exercising the choice to sin and full knowledge of the gravity and sinfulness of the act. Any act (sin of commission) or failure to act (sin of omission) which meets these criteria is a mortal sin which, if unrepented of before judgement, merits condemnation.
Is there anything in the above paragraph that fails to answer the OP’s reason for posting? If so, please address…

I have a question for the OP: was the “Re” in the Title a reference to another thread?


#10

You are incorrect. Greed is not an act per se but a disposition.
Failure to act due to greed is a sin of omission; acting upon greed is a sin of commission.


#11

You are mistaken - badly mistaken. Christ’s new command to us is “to love one another”. Failure to do so is a sin.

If that was the case we would all be in the same boat.

And how does the fact that we ARE all in the same boat mean that failure to act isn’t a mortal sin?? You are just afraid to hear the fullness of truth in this respect - we are all in the same boat anchored by a distorted, sinful selfishness that we must constantly struggle to dislodge, and confess when we fail.

Mortal sins tends to come from what we do not from what we fail to do.

This is merely an opinion and has no basis in Church teaching.

To say that I did not feed the poor or clothe them or to give drink to anyone who is thirsty means much more than just lack of doing something.

Whatever. When you know you are to do those things and OMIT doing them you sin - it’s no more complicated than that.

Every sin flows from pride and self-will. I am not saying just to confess your pride and self-will but it is a great start to understand why people will not serve others better than themselves.

Here you are entirely correct, but the truth you put forth here in no way obviates the simultaneous truth that to knowingly and freely fail to do good is a sin of omission, and if it involves grave matter it is a mortal sin.


#12

Fair enough. My thinking there was that greed would cause one to grasp and cling to what they have, refusing to share… would you agree that these things would be acts of commission?

We might be splitting hairs here or playing with semantics…but I would like your input on this.

Peace
James


#13

I think you are addressing every sin here while I am not. You misinterpret my words. I do not think a person who is constantly thinking about sinning all the time will achieve any healthy spiritual balance to their life. I talk more from an Orthodox perspective so that I do not see judging every sin as a way to correct it. What I described in my post has to do with an unhealthy judgment on ourselves if we are to follow the Lord’s commandment to love. I do not see Matthew 25 as a list of mortal sins. Rather I see a condition that needs to be addressed that has caused this list in Matthew 25 to exist. We probably agree that we are saying the same thing but I will use words that might have a different meaning than what you use them for yet in the final analysis we are trying to say the same thing even if you do not seem to understand them. I do not think that every sin needs to be accounted for since not all sin leads to death. Therefore I try not to judge people on account of this understanding. I will see the most damaging sins as those which needs to be treated first. If we try to conquer from this perspective than most people will find healing. I do not judge someone who has not given because it is not mine (judgment) to give. When I said we are all in the same boat I mean we are putting too much unnecessary judgment on ourselves while not addressing the positive side of our faith. It is too easy to label others even ourselves while not looking at the positive side of our faith. In that respect we need to leave this judgment to God. What we need to do is to live out our faith which is more of a repentance than what any confession would be able to do for us.


#14

The Confiteor does not obtain forgiveness of mortal sins, only venial.

Like what?

So are sins of omission mortal sins?


#15

So they are mortal sins.

So if someone is afraid of the future and does not give generously, they are committing a grave evil since we are required to be poor and have no money.

So self-will is what is evil, the self is evil.

What about fear of the future? What if I think the future is going to be horrible, economically speaking, and I keep saving money.


#16

So selfishness is evil, and since selfishness is putting the self first, the self must therefore be evil.

What about fear of the future?


#17

Like what?
For a sin to be mortal it requires grave matter, knowledge of the sinful character of the act and a deliberate and free act of the will.

The things you describe would constitute grave matter, but that alone will not make something mortal.

Whoa - - hold the horses here…
Where did you get that we are required to be poor and have no money?

What do you mean by “fear of the future”?

I want to be able to answer you properly.

Peace
James
[/quote]


#18

All those scripture verses that rail against the rich, and the beatitudes about the poor, the demand from Christ that the rich young man give away all his possessions before he can follow him. That’s where I get that.

I have fear of the future. Age discrimination in the workforce, layoffs all the time, economic crash, bad things happening and no protection from them.


#19

They may or may not be. Depends if the three conditions are met.


#20

I totally agree with this. Mortal sins tend to come from commission sins not omissions.


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