Sins of the parents impacting future generations?


#1

I was told by a Baptist that they were taught if there parents sinned the parents offspring could suffer the sins of the parents to the tenth generation. I, being a catholic, never heard of this. Has anyone else? Thanks Jay


#2

[quote=Exodus34:17]…yet He will by no means leave the guilty unpunished, visiting the iniquity of fathers on the children and on the grandchildren to the third and fourth generations.
[/quote]

I have heard this from other Baptists, so it is not just your one Baptist friend. I think in some ways it quite naturally seems true. If a father peters away his money and dies face down in a ditch, it is going to have some impact on the lives of his children. Look at Al-Anon, Al-ateen, etc. Our problems/sins do affect those around us.


#3

If one generation were to start an all out nuclear war that destroyed most of the planet, would the future generations be impacted by the sins of those that waged nuclear war?


#4

Adam sinned. We are all suffering as a result.


#5

It was thought by the Jews in Jesus’ time that a child might be born blind or crippled because of his parents sin. Jesus heals a man born blind in John’s Gospel and Jesus says." He was born blind not because of his parents sin, but to give Glory to God." (When Jesus healed him.)

It is easy to see that some sins can pass down to future generations, AIDS and other STD’s from illicit sexual encounters, alcoholism, incest, physical abuse, drug abuse etc. Some of these latter sins can cause a degree of unproductive or addictive behavior in several generations. So in a sense their are sins that impact even to the fourth generation and further.


#6

[quote=jay29]I was told by a Baptist that they were taught if there parents sinned the parents offspring could suffer the sins of the parents to the tenth generation. I, being a catholic, never heard of this. Has anyone else? Thanks Jay
[/quote]

I think it is four generations, according to Scripture.

Ex 20:5 “I am the Lord thy God, mighty, jealous, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children, unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me

This is certainly in accord with Catholic doctrine.

Yet I think the point the Sacred Author was trying to make was the immense mercy of God. As he says in the very next verse,

Ex 20:6 “***And shewing mercy unto thousands to them that love me, and keep my commandments.***”


#7

i think thats why its so important to teach our kids about our faith. I know i am going to have some fired up talks to my daughter about alot of things especially chastity and the dangers of fornication when she gets of age.


#8

I was reading, though it is unnapproved as yet that Baptism frees us from this generational curse, I’m swaying more to this opininon though I can’t be sure.

Does “Generational Healing” conflict with Catholic teachings?

There is nothing in Catholic teachings to support “Generational Healing.” In fact, there is plenty to support that this belief is nothing more than a “wishful magic formula” that inter-mingles Catholic Church Liturgy such as the Holy Mass and the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist to give credibility to its movement. In its process, “Generational Healing” rejects the Catholic teachings regarding the Sacraments of Baptism and Confession. Allow me to explain!

**During the Sacrament of Baptism of an infant, the priest says two prayers of Exorcism. During the first prayer, after the reading of the Gospel, the Priest commands any impure spirits who might be present to depart from the person to be baptized. This process is to purify the physical body of the believer. The second prayer of Exorcism is called “Ephpheta.” (Ephpheta means ‘Be opened’) After the prayer, the Priest touches the ears and mouth of the infant with his thumb. He then says, “The Lord Jesus made the deaf hear and the dumb speak. May He soon touch your ears to receive His Word, and your mouth to proclaim His faith, to the praise and glory of God the Father.” ** >>>> catholicdoors.com/isit/isit12.htm


#9

After baptism, the only way a soul can descend to hell is by actual mortal sin. Thus, the sins of the father cannot cause the baptized to descend to hell. However, the sins of the father can have the consequence of temporal suffering upon the son.

Not all suffering, however, is due to one’s own personal sins or to the sins of one’s father. Sometimes, the just suffer for the greater glory of God. Consequently, suffering of the just can be meritorious, not penitential.

In other words, personal sins are not passed on like original sin. (cf. St. Pius V, condemnation of the errors of Michael Du Bay, *Ex omnibus afflictionibus, *Oct 1, 1567, Denzinger 1052)


#10

Which is, of course, merely the opinion of the author of the link you quoted, and not the teaching of the Catholic Church.


#11

[quote=Matt16_18]Which is, of course, merely the opinion of the author of the link you quoted, and not the teaching of the Catholic Church.
[/quote]

So can you provide more info on this please, yes it’s the opinion of the author.
Would you say Mary was in line for the generational curse even though she had no sin ? Jesus etc.

When we get corrupted info we can become corrupted, if we allow it.
What is the teaching of the Catholic Church on generational healing, seems like it makes a mockery of Baptism, and Baptism was only instituted after Jesus arose.
So those that died before Jesus died would have to be brought into Heaven by Baptism of desire, Elijah etc:
I’m not here to argue, just looking for a definative statement on generational healing, I couldn’t find it in the CCC.


#12

I was only talking to my 40yr old son tonight about why I would not let him see “Planet of The Apes” when he was a child…it goes back to a bad experience in a movie with a gorilla in it that I saw as a child that scared me! I think the consequences of our sins can be passed on to our children, as well as the consequences of things that have happened to us in our own lives that are not at all involving sin. My son and I were talking about that very passage from the Bible and I was explaining to him that its not only the consequences of what is clearly sin that can be passed on.

Barb


#13

Go to this link
www.spiritdaily.com/afterliferelatives.htm
This topic is adressed. I found it interesting myself.


#14

By the very nature of sin, my sin affects others, especially those closest to me. The effects are not limited to them alone however. This is why sin is so serious: it affects the entire Body of Christ and the world. There is nothing to say the effects have a limited temporal range.


#15

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