Smokers (ex?)


#1

There was a thread about some of us quiting smoking a while back. I can’t find it, so I started a new one.

How’s everyone doing? Still not smoking? I quit Feb. 14th and have not had one since. Get a craving once in a while, but otherwise I’m fine. How 'bout you guys?


#2

[quote=pira114]There was a thread about some of us quiting smoking a while back. I can’t find it, so I started a new one.

How’s everyone doing? Still not smoking? I quit Feb. 14th and have not had one since. Get a craving once in a while, but otherwise I’m fine. How 'bout you guys?
[/quote]

I quit about 3 years ago but it can still be a struggle because I have quite a few family members that smoke. Usually, being around them reminds me of why I quit but there are times that I want just one. Of course, it helps that my husband and I quit together so we can definitely support each other when we get that craving. The worst times are when I get stressed out and don’t have my little ones. My oldest sister also recently quit so I have a support group so to speak. My MIL hasn’t smoked in 35 years but she says that it took her 3 or 4 years to get over regular cravings. Good luck and hang in there!!! The first month is the hardest.


#3

I was a 2 pack a day smoker…my last cigaret was on Jan 19, 1998.

If you get the urge, sniff a smoker and smell the sickening peutrid scent of old stale smoke.


#4

[quote=pira114]There was a thread about some of us quiting smoking a while back. I can’t find it, so I started a new one.

How’s everyone doing? Still not smoking? I quit Feb. 14th and have not had one since. Get a craving once in a while, but otherwise I’m fine. How 'bout you guys?
[/quote]

Here’s the thread:

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=100820


#5

I quit about 5 years ago. A few weeks ago, we attended a party given by one of dh’s customers at a pool hall/bar. I almost vomited when I walked in the door. The smell of stale smoke combined with almost everyone there was smoking was disgusting. Every once in a blue moon I get a small craving, and I think of the smell…which is why I quit in the first place. Kills the craving every time.


#6

I quit smoking for good after my second child was born. And to be honest, it wasn’t because I really wanted too… it was fear from the social repercussions from my husband and my oldest child. Pathetic excuse, I know… but I didn’t want my husband to be disappointed in me (I quit during the pregnancy but started up a week and a half after birth) and I didn’t want my oldest child to start thinking it was ok. (Nothing like having a child emulate a bad habit of yours)

It was hard at first, but it does get better. I can now not stand the smell of being around smokers when they aren’t smoking. It’s the stale smell that lingers on their clothing and in their hair that gets to me. My MIL smokes like a chimney and I hate visiting her because then I come home and everything we have smells like an ashtray.

Good luck and keep it up! The cravings will diminish greatly, but the thoughts will run through your head once in awhile. It’s been almost 4 years for me and I have the thought once in awhile, but it’s very easy to push it aside now. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:


#7

[quote=tamccrackine]I quit smoking for good after my second child was born. And to be honest, it wasn’t because I really wanted too… it was fear from the social repercussions from my husband and my oldest child. Pathetic excuse, I know… but I didn’t want my husband to be disappointed in me (I quit during the pregnancy but started up a week and a half after birth) and I didn’t want my oldest child to start thinking it was ok. (Nothing like having a child emulate a bad habit of yours)

It was hard at first, but it does get better. I can now not stand the smell of being around smokers when they aren’t smoking. It’s the stale smell that lingers on their clothing and in their hair that gets to me. My MIL smokes like a chimney and I hate visiting her because then I come home and everything we have smells like an ashtray.

Good luck and keep it up! The cravings will diminish greatly, but the thoughts will run through your head once in awhile. It’s been almost 4 years for me and I have the thought once in awhile, but it’s very easy to push it aside now. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
[/quote]

Bravo for you! I know a lot of people say that you need to “want it for yourself” to give up an addiction, but I say “hey, what ever works!”


#8

[quote=tamccrackine] …Good luck and keep it up! The cravings will diminish greatly, but the thoughts will run through your head once in awhile. It’s been almost 4 years for me and I have the thought once in awhile, but it’s very easy to push it aside now. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
[/quote]

It’s been almost 8 years for me and sometimes out of no where I would sell my soul for a cigarette.

                 Kathy

#9

I can’t tell you all how happy this thread makes me.
My husband quit when he was about 22 as a gift to me. I never said I wantedd him to quit or spoke negative about it to him, but he must have known it bothered me. I grew up around smokers, so I was used to it. But when I started living on my own, whenever I went around the smoke, it made me very sick.
My mom died from COPD last October. For anyone that doesn’t know, COPD is when you have emphysema complicated with another lung disease such as bronchitis, which is also very common with smokers. She quit when she was diangosed back in 1997, but it was too late. She would have been 60 on february 12th.
You are saving your loved ones of the possible misery of not only watching you die that way some day, but also having to take care of you if you become ill. I appreciate those GEL adds, but really, my mom looked MUCH worse than any of those people. It took everything from her a little bit at a time, and she was in physical agony even on very large amounts of pain meds. Oh yes, and she was a prisoner in her own home. We got her one of those nice lift chairs, but it didn’t help so she was stuck in a glider rocker with her feet propped up for months because she couldn’t move and couldn’t breath lying down. She actually passed away in that chair. It was horrible, but she suffers no more.
I will pray that all people who are trying to kick the habit continue to be successful.


#10

I quit smoking about 15 years ago, after about 35 years of smoking a pipe. All I do to get rid of the urge is to look at the price of pipe tobacco these days. I couldn’t afford it, even if I wanted to. I quit cold turkey, which wasn’t easy, but I hung in there and did it, thanks to my wife.


#11

Just wanted to add that my grandmother smoked for over 50 years and she died from cancer. Started off as lung cancer and spread so rapidly and painfully she spent the last 100 days of her life so doped up on morphine that I really don’t think she knew we were around. It was very sad.

My FIL also smoked very heavily nearly his entire life. Advice from his folks when he started at 12 was “don’t burn down the barn.” 16 days before his first granddaughter was to be born, he thought he put out a cigarette but he didn’t and it ignited his oxygen tube, which he always put his mouth piece up by his nose… so to keep a gory story presentable, he died from severe inhalation burns after my MIL had to extinguish his face. (Oxygen is highly flamable–for those that didn’t know)

I’m sure lots of people have stories like these… but sometimes, it’s these stories that will keep others from starting (or starting back up).

Keep it up those of you that gave smoking up for Lent! I’m rooting (and praying) for you!!! :thumbsup:


#12

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