Snipping off the family jewels


#1

Our neighborhood is home to a two-year-old intact tom named Petey. We’ve known Petey since he was kitten, and since he’s reached sexual maturity he’s not only spraying neighborhood doorsteps and landscaping with regularity, he’s also needed medical attention a couple of times for what appear to be fight injuries. Not to mention the fact that he’s sowing his oats hither and yon.

Petey’s owner, a young woman who lives down the street, seems oblivious to the fact that Petey needs to be neutered. I’ve had a couple of conversations with her over the months about Petey during which she’s told me she’s taken him a to the vet a couple of times to get his battle wounds tended and his vaccinations updated. But she’s not had him snipped.

The woman doesn’t own a cattery, and he’s not a show cat; he’s a standard issue tabby housecat. When I’ve broached the topic of getting Petey neutered, politely mentioning the fact we can smell his spray from just about everywhere in our house when we’ve got the windows open and voicing my concern about his injuries, she shakes her head vaguely and makes noises about how she needs to get around to that “at some point.”

I’m really in a quandary. Petey is a lovely little guy, and I don’t want to watch him fight himself to death before he’s five. I also don’t want him to spray the wrong house and end up shot or poisoned.

Most importantly, I don’t want the neighborhood to be littered with little stray Peteys. For the third year in a row this spring we’ve found one or two kittens in our yard that we’ve had to take to the animal shelter, and it’s heartbreaking. Our family also supports a local no-kill cat sanctuary, and we’ve seen just how dire the unwanted pet situation is in our community.

Our family can afford to get Petey fixed. Should we offer to take him to the local low-cost clinic for her? If she says thanks but no, should we press her? He’s chipped, so if we surrender him at a shelter they’re just going to return him to her. We called and confirmed that.

And no, both our 15-year-old Siamese grande dame and my husband would be apoplectic if I brought another cat home, so don’t even go there. :rotfl:

Any ideas/suggestions?


#2

I volunteer for an animal shelter, so I understand what you are going through. Lots of people don't realize how important it is for people to spay/neuter their pets.

Anyway, I know that sometimes the shelter I volunteer at offers "discounted" spay/neuter days where they will spay/neuter pets for 50% off (or whatever). Perhaps there is a shelter in your area which will do that and you can inform her of that to encourage her to do it.

I know that you have already attempted to tell her about the benefits to neutering her kitty. She probably doesn't believe that it is important.

Would she let you pay for it? If so, and if you can afford it (which I think that you said you could), I would do it. As for pressing her about it........ Maybe give it to her as a gift. Merry Christmas to you! We will pay for Petey's surgery!! Happy Memorial Day!! We will pay for Petey's surgery!!

That might be the only way to do it. And it would benefit your family..... no more kittens to bring to the shelter.

Good luck!!


#3

Your neighbor is being cruel by not neutering Petey. You've already told her he is getting in fights, getting injured because of it. She (not Petey) may be responsible for the birth and untimely death of a huge number of unwanted cats. Any reasonable person, who truly loves animals, and has their interest at heart, would understand. I'd try one more time to reason with her. If she doesn't take care of him, someone (I don't mean you) is going to find a way to solve the Petey problem. He deserves better.


#4

[quote="karow, post:1, topic:241125"]
Our neighborhood is home to a two-year-old intact tom named Petey. We’ve known Petey since he was kitten, and since he’s reached sexual maturity he’s not only spraying neighborhood doorsteps and landscaping with regularity, he’s also needed medical attention a couple of times for what appear to be fight injuries. Not to mention the fact that he’s sowing his oats hither and yon.

Petey’s owner, a young woman who lives down the street, seems oblivious to the fact that Petey needs to be neutered. I’ve had a couple of conversations with her over the months about Petey during which she’s told me she’s taken him a to the vet a couple of times to get his battle wounds tended and his vaccinations updated. But she’s not had him snipped.

The woman doesn’t own a cattery, and he’s not a show cat; he’s a standard issue tabby housecat. When I’ve broached the topic of getting Petey neutered, politely mentioning the fact we can smell his spray from just about everywhere in our house when we’ve got the windows open and voicing my concern about his injuries, she shakes her head vaguely and makes noises about how she needs to get around to that “at some point.”

I’m really in a quandary. Petey is a lovely little guy, and I don’t want to watch him fight himself to death before he’s five. I also don’t want him to spray the wrong house and end up shot or poisoned.

Most importantly, I don’t want the neighborhood to be littered with little stray Peteys. For the third year in a row this spring we’ve found one or two kittens in our yard that we’ve had to take to the animal shelter, and it’s heartbreaking. Our family also supports a local no-kill cat sanctuary, and we’ve seen just how dire the unwanted pet situation is in our community.

Our family can afford to get Petey fixed. Should we offer to take him to the local low-cost clinic for her? If she says thanks but no, should we press her? He’s chipped, so if we surrender him at a shelter they’re just going to return him to her. We called and confirmed that.

And no, both our 15-year-old Siamese grande dame and my husband would be apoplectic if I brought another cat home, so don't even go there. :rotfl:

Any ideas/suggestions?

[/quote]

There are so many unwanted animals and so many being dumped every day everywhere in the world. That is very good of you to offer to pay for Petey's neutering. Please do suggest that. If she says no after all your persuasion, if I were you, I would do it anyway. This would be out of compassion for Petey. Further you have had to take responsibility for his kittens (probably) and you and your neighbours have to bear the consequences of her irresponsibility. Some people where I live 'neuter and release' male and female cats. Its hard to know if these cats have homes as they wander everywhwere. I can't even leave my remaining cat out alone in the garden as I am afraid she will be attacked by unneutered cats roaming the neighbourhood.
She may not even notice. Sometimes necessity requires us to act which would be an act of mercy. God bless.


#5

First I would find out the by-laws in your community. If someone spayed her cat, she could have just action to sue you.

Also, as much of a pain as this cat is to you, unfortunately, you do not rule the neighbourhood. Call the authorities and figure what rights you have. If Petey’s owner is doing nothing illegal, you need to ask God for acceptance

CM


#6

In our neighborhood …animal control has come through and picked up ANY cats they see out and about…taken them down to the shelter…spayed/neutered them…given them shots…and returned them to the neighborhood as “ferals”. I know…we had a stray coming around that we “adopted”…Ie…we fed him…and he was picked up and “snipped”. Perhaps “Petey” could “disappear” for a few days and come back a new kitty…and the owner would not know the difference. Check and see if your area has a “catch and release” program for cats. If it does…you can either call them and have them come get “Petey” or you can catch him and do it yourself and blame the “kitty police”. LOL


#7

I like Debbie's idea about the Trap, Neuter, Release program (if it is available in your area), however, as part of their assessment they may check for microchips and contact the owner, rather than neuter the kitty.

In our city, it is illegal for cats to roam at large and Animal Control will pick them up. They contact the owner, who can get their kitty back only by paying a fine. And the fine is double for unaltered pets, which kind of encourages a trip for a snip. :o

The fine goes up for each subsequent capture, and on the third time any unaltered pet receives a mandatory "revision."

Karow, perhaps you can check what your local Animal Control practices or laws are?


#8

It is legal to trap an animal that comes onto your property. I don’t know about having him fixed and returning/releasing him afterward. You could trap Petey and take him down to the animal shelter and explain the situation about the spraying on your property, etc., and say that you would like to pay for his being neutered, and that you’ve already talked to the owner, but she hasn’t done anything about it yet. And, just see what they say?

We found out the law about trapping the hard way when we adopted a stray kitty in our neighborhood. She wasn’t housetrained, so we had a pet sitter come on Thanksgiving weekend to replenish her food on our front porch. While we were away, our next door neighbor trapped her and took her down to the animal shelter where she was euthanized. :mad:

Good luck! If it were me, I would probably have Petey fixed as a Happy Memorial Day gift!


#9

Thanks everyone for your opinions and advice. I appreciate it.

After talking it over with my husband, I've decided to have my husband approach the neighbor with a direct offer to take Petey in to be neutered. He's 1000% more persuasive than I am face-to-face. If she refuses, I'll trap him in a Havahart and get him snipped anyway. I really don't want to go that route; I'd be furious if someone took my cats to the vets without my permission in a non-emergency situation, you know?. But then, my cats are fixed, indoor beasts who don't roam the neighborhood. And I really don't want to have a showdown with my neighbor over this. She's a nice lady, and I don't want to brew bad blood in the neighborhood.

Let's just pray she lets me take care of Petey's jewels. :p


#10

[quote="karow, post:9, topic:241125"]
Thanks everyone for your opinions and advice. I appreciate it.

After talking it over with my husband, I've decided to have my husband approach the neighbor with a direct offer to take Petey in to be neutered. He's 1000% more persuasive than I am face-to-face. If she refuses, I'll trap him in a Havahart and get him snipped anyway. I really don't want to go that route; I'd be furious if someone took my cats to the vets without my permission in a non-emergency situation, you know?. But then, my cats are fixed, indoor beasts who don't roam the neighborhood. And I really don't want to have a showdown with my neighbor over this. She's a nice lady, and I don't want to brew bad blood in the neighborhood.

Let's just pray she lets me take care of Petey's jewels. :p

[/quote]

Gosh if you don't want a showdown, leave Petey alone.

He is not your cat.

If they take your offer fine, but I think taking someone elses property and changing it is wrong...irrespective of your good intentions.


#11

[quote="Mary_Gail_36, post:10, topic:241125"]
Gosh if you don't want a showdown, leave Petey alone.

He is not your cat.

If they take your offer fine, but I think taking someone elses property and changing it is wrong...irrespective of your good intentions.

[/quote]

I see your point. Absolutely I do.

But it's also wrong to allow an intact tom to roam a neighborhood, spraying, fighting, and breeding. It's wrong to to expect your neighbors to re-paint their front door, like we're doing this summer, because your animal's excretions have ruined the paint job. And it's wrong to let your neighbor's daughters to find your animal's offspring in their bushes and expect their parents to have to deal with them tearfully begging to be allowed to keep them.

We like Petey, and we're struggling to be good neighbors. But Petey's ruined our property; we've caught him any number of times absolutely hosing our front door. I don't know if you know what tom spray does to paint, but it essentially strips it. And the stench, which we've had to buy special enzyme detergents to mitigate, is horrible. And it never really completely goes away.

It's the spraying, frankly, that I worry is going to end up getting the animal hurt. My husband had a conversation with the guy who lives on the other side of us, and this man is ready to kill Petey for spraying his property. He's furious, and he could give a rip about Petey. I'm sure he isn't alone, and I imagine someone lacing cat food with poison or going after Petey with a pellet gun.

In March we found a tiny Petey look a-like in the bushes on the side of our house, which our daughters begged to be allowed to keep. We couldn't, we had to take her to the shelter, and my youngest daughter had nightmares about dead kittens afterwards. And frankly, I teared up on the way to the shelter myself.

So, yeah, I don't relish the idea of being a Betty Bad Neighbor, but Petey's owner is being irresponsible and isn't exactly keeping her pet's best interests and welfare in mind. We're tired of cleaning up after this cat, and we're concerned for his overall welfare.

It's a quandary, but it's going to be solved one way or another. Either Petey is going to end up fixed or severely injured/killed. I'm leaning toward the former solution, even if we have to take matter into our own hands.

Thanks for your reply.


#12

[quote="karow, post:11, topic:241125"]
I see your point. Absolutely I do.

But it's also wrong to allow an intact tom to roam a neighborhood, spraying, fighting, and breeding. It's wrong to to expect your neighbors to re-paint their front door, like we're doing this summer, because your animal's excretions have ruined the paint job. And it's wrong to let your neighbor's daughters to find your animal's offspring in their bushes and expect their parents to have to deal with them tearfully begging to be allowed to keep them.

We like Petey, and we're struggling to be good neighbors. But Petey's ruined our property; we've caught him any number of times absolutely hosing our front door. I don't know if you know what tom spray does to paint, but it essentially strips it. And the stench, which we've had to buy special enzyme detergents to mitigate, is horrible. And it never really completely goes away.

It's the spraying, frankly, that I worry is going to end up getting the animal hurt. My husband had a conversation with the guy who lives on the other side of us, and this man is ready to kill Petey for spraying his property. He's furious, and he could give a rip about Petey. I'm sure he isn't alone, and I imagine someone lacing cat food with poison or going after Petey with a pellet gun.

In March we found a tiny Petey look a-like in the bushes on the side of our house, which our daughters begged to be allowed to keep. We couldn't, we had to take her to the shelter, and my youngest daughter had nightmares about dead kittens afterwards. And frankly, I teared up on the way to the shelter myself.

So, yeah, I don't relish the idea of being a Betty Bad Neighbor, but Petey's owner is being irresponsible and isn't exactly keeping her pet's best interests and welfare in mind. We're tired of cleaning up after this cat, and we're concerned for his overall welfare.

It's a quandary, but it's going to be solved one way or another. Either Petey is going to end up fixed or severely injured/killed. I'm leaning toward the former solution, even if we have to take matter into our own hands.

Thanks for your reply.

[/quote]

OK...do you have an animal control department? When Petey comes by and starts damaging things, call them. Or call now and ask what your recourses are.

But don't get it done yourself, he isn't your property, and you might be held liable.


#13

My kitty, Aslan Max, is a “late neuter”. According to his rescuer, he was about 9 months old when neutered. Believe me, they WILL have issues if this is done late. It’s also cruel, as someone mentioned, to not have the little guy fixed. Maybe someone from the SPCA or some other animal welfare group could visit your neighbor? Good luck to Petey and God bless you!:thumbsup:


#14

[quote="Mary_Gail_36, post:12, topic:241125"]
OK...do you have an animal control department? When Petey comes by and starts damaging things, call them. Or call now and ask what your recourses are.

But don't get it done yourself, he isn't your property, and you might be held liable.

[/quote]

We wouldn't run a legal risk if we humanly trapped Petey on our property. We've confirmed this: if we trap him we've got 12 hours to get him to a shelter. That's the ordinance in our community.

Alas and unfortunately, our animal control department is down to about one guy with a Havahart trap and a truck. We live in the folly otherwise known as California, where cuts have decimated municipal budgets. But we have called animal control to confirm that we do need to trap him ourselves, they won't send someone to set or check traps, but they do rent traps for $5/day.

The other consideration is our local shelters just about lead the nation cat and dog euthanization. The statistics caused quite a brouhaha in the papers last winter. The no-kill shelters won't take him because we're not Petey's owner (tried to go that route already), and I fear the kill shelters will do just that if we take him there. I don't even think they wait 72 hours anymore.

So yeah... It's kind of like watching an animal run around with a time bomb strapped to it and hesitating to get involved because he's not ours.

I think we're going to as persuasively as we can (or rather, my husband can because he's the better talker :) ) explain to Petey's owner that she's got three choices: get him snipped herself and we can give her the money to do so if she's broke, let us get him snipped at our expense, or risk him walking into a Havahart trap in someone's bushes, in which case she may never see him again. We'll see that she says and go from there.


#15

[quote="RosalieM, post:13, topic:241125"]
My kitty, Aslan Max, is a "late neuter". According to his rescuer, he was about 9 months old when neutered. Believe me, they WILL have issues if this is done late.

[/quote]

I hear you. I was once owned by a cat who was neutered well past sexual maturity, too, and he was always just a tad more territorial and aggressive than my other male, who was neutered at four months..


#16

Karow, I am not a lawyer, however it the veterinarian scans for a microchip and finds that you are not the owner, the vet may refuse to neuter because doing so places them at legal risk. At least that is the warning in an article on the website of the California Veterinary Medical Association. It seems to have been written by a practicing attorney in California, so you might want to read through it:
cvma.net/images/cvmapdf/MicrochipScan.pdf


#17

[quote="Dale_M, post:16, topic:241125"]
Karow, I am not a lawyer, however it the veterinarian scans for a microchip and finds that you are not the owner, the vet may refuse to neuter because doing so places them at legal risk. At least that is the warning in an article on the website of the California Veterinary Medical Association. It seems to have been written by a practicing attorney in California, so you might want to read through it:
cvma.net/images/cvmapdf/MicrochipScan.pdf

[/quote]

Yep, you are correct. Our vet did tell us that if we can get written consent from Petey's owner, she'll snip him. There's also a volunteer organization here that will neuter him for $45, much cheaper than our vet, by the way. But again, they'll only do it with written consent.

Thanks for the info.:)


#18

[quote="karow, post:15, topic:241125"]
I was once owned by a cat who was neutered well past sexual maturity, too, and he was always just a tad more territorial and aggressive than my other male, who was neutered at four months..

[/quote]

I had the same experience with a cat we had when I was in high school. He found us, he was a stray kitten that my stepfather found in our yard.

My parents refused to get him neutered (don't even get me started on it). I eventually saved the money to have him neutered because he was getting into so many fights.

Ultimately, he was so detested by people in the neighborhood that someone took matters into their own hands with their car.


#19

[quote="karow, post:15, topic:241125"]
I hear you. I was once owned by a cat who was neutered well past sexual maturity, too, and he was always just a tad more territorial and aggressive than my other male, who was neutered at four months..

[/quote]

Oh I'm definitely his servant. Everything is done his way. He even bossed the vet around during his checkup and would only allow just so much before he jumped into his carrier letting us know he was ready to leave.:)


#20

Will pray she agrees.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.