So let's talk about today's readings 10/18/09

October 18, 2009

Reading 1
Is 53:10-11

The LORD was pleased
to crush him in infirmity. If he gives his life as an offering for sin,
he shall see his descendants in a long life,
and the will of the LORD shall be accomplished through him.
Because of his affliction
he shall see the light in fullness
of days;
through his suffering, my servant shall justify many,
and their guilt he shall bear.

Responsorial Psalm
Ps 33:4-5, 18-19, 20, 22

R. (22)Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.
Upright is the word of the LORD,
and all his works are trustworthy.
He loves justice and right;
of the kindness of the LORD the earth is full.
R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.
See, the eyes of the LORD are upon those who fear him,
upon those who hope for his kindness,
To deliver them from death
and preserve them in spite of famine.
R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.
Our soul waits for the LORD,
who is our help and our shield.
May your kindness, O LORD, be upon us
who have put our hope in you.
R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.

Reading II
Heb 4:14-16 Brothers and sisters:
Since we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens,
Jesus, the Son of God,
let us hold fast to our confession.
For we do not have a high priest
who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses,
but one who has similarly been tested in every way,
yet without sin.
So let us confidently approach the throne of grace
to receive mercy and to find grace for timely help.

Gospel
Mk 10:35-45 or 10:42-45

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came to Jesus and said to him,
“Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.”
He replied, “What do you wish me to do for you?”
They answered him, “Grant that in your glory
we may sit one at your right and the other at your left.”
Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking.
Can you drink the cup that I drink
or be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?”
They said to him, “We can.”
Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink, you will drink,
and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized;
but to sit at my right or at my left is not mine to give
but is for those for whom it has been prepared.”
When the ten heard this, they became indignant at James and John.
Jesus summoned them and said to them,
“You know that those who are recognized as rulers over the Gentiles
lord it over them,
and their great ones make their authority over them felt.
But it shall not be so among you.
Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant;
whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all.
For the Son of Man did not come to be served
but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.” or
Jesus summoned the twelve and said to them,
“You know that those who are recognized as rulers over the Gentiles
lord it over them,
and their great ones make their authority over them felt.
But it shall not be so among you.
Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant;
whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all.
For the Son of Man did not come to be served
but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

“The LORD was pleased
to crush him in infirmity.”
– How can He be pleased, when He came to heal?
This first reading makes me think of the idea of people who are ill or injured
“joining their suffering to Christ”. That their infirmity is a cross, and that their
suffering has the power to… to what? What does suffering of imperfect
humans do for anyone? I’ve never quite been able to understand it in my mind.

“and all his works are trustworthy.”
– the first reading said he was pleased to cause suffering, and the psalm said
his works are trustworthy. It is a great mystery, since we don’t know what is
going on in God’s mind, that’s all we can do, is trust Him. Like Joseph, son
of Jacob.

“Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant;
whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all.
For the Son of Man did not come to be served”
– I guess that’s why elected people call themselves “public servant”

Today is the day of St. Luke

So what struck you about today’s readings? :bible1::twocents:

It seems to me that in the first reading Isaiah is speaking about the coming of Jesus isn’t he. I went back and red the entire chapter and it he is clearly speaking of the coming of Christ. A prophetic statement, no? So, Isaiah is saying that God was happy to visit “infirmity” on Christ so that our snd could be forgiven. It may seem cruel, I guess, from a worldly perspective, but it demonstrates God’s love for us. And, doesn’t it point out that we should suffer whatever “infirmity” God chooses to bless us with with joy and love?

The Gospel reading is a good one. As I understand it, the sons of Zebedee are figuring that Jesus is about to fullfill his mission. They are wanting to secure a place of authority in the new kingdom. I think it at least implies that they expected the kingdom to become a reality rigth away. My feeble understanding of Church history tells me that this was the expectation of the early leaders. In other words, they were surprised it was taking so long. It gives me tremendous hope. I figure if they, who knew Christ in the flesh, heard the original Gospel at his feet, could still misunderstand. I feel better when I think of them when I encounter some scripture that perplexes me. Or, when I think I know what the Word says and then sometime later realize that I had it all wrong. I think of the Apostles and give myself a break.

In his Homily yesterday, our priest tied the 3 readings together like this: Which ladder of sucess are you trying to climb? Jesus is the suffering servant. James and John aspired to be equal to Christ, by sitting at his right and left hand, but Jesus said they must serve, as he came to serve and die for mankind, and whoever thinks he is first shall be last and vice versa.

Welcome Big Ro. Right you are, yes, the whole chapter is referring to Jesus, the
suffering servant. Yet we never heard of any illness or weakness of any kind, only
injuries, and only at the end of His life. He may have been meek, but He wasn’t
weak, and we don’t hear of any kind of sickness or handicap of any kind in His
whole life. So if they were looking at this passage to recognize Messiah, they
wouldn’t recognize Him till He died. I think it’s o.k. to be perplexed about scripture.
We will get the answers when God wants us to know. Remember, He hides things
from the clever and the learned anyway. Maybe we should hang out with “mere
children” more.
Even Jesus didn’t know the day or the hour, and He was Jesus. He knew everything.
I think He “gave Himself a break”. He knew He would find out when God wanted Him
to know.

This is good. It is very good.

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