Sola gratia,sola fide sola Christos


#1

Salvation through grace alone, by faith alone in Christ alone.

What do you disagree with?


#2

I disagree with it because it is in opposition to the “deposit of faith” left to us by the apostles that was inspired by the Holy Spirit. There is only one Church that is “one, holy, catholic and apostolic.” That Church is not Protestant.


#3

[quote=Xavier]Salvation through grace alone, by faith alone in Christ alone.
[/quote]

I believe in salvation by grace, through faith in Jesus Christ.

Our good works are the fruit of a vibrant faith.


#4

[quote=Mickey]I believe in salvation by grace, through faith in Jesus Christ.

Our good works are the fruit of a vibrant faith.
[/quote]

Ditto me. :thumbsup:

Subrosa


#5

[quote=Xavier]Salvation through grace alone, by faith alone in Christ alone.

What do you disagree with?
[/quote]

You’ve got it backwards. It should be **BY grace, THROUGH faith. ** Also, since there are two parts to this formula, the word “alone,” logically, can’t be included.

In fact, the only place in the Scriptures we see the words “faith” and “alone” together are in James 2:24:

See how a person is justified by works and not by faith alone.


#6

[quote=Mickey]I believe in salvation by grace, through faith in Jesus Christ.

Our good works are the fruit of a vibrant faith.
[/quote]

Agreed!


#7

[quote=Xavier]Salvation through grace alone, by faith alone in Christ alone.

What do you disagree with?
[/quote]

So, hey Xavier - what’s your stand on this?

By the way, is your last name Onassis? yuk! LOL

Subrosa


#8

[quote=Xavier]Salvation through grace alone, by faith alone in Christ alone.

What do you disagree with?
[/quote]

Saving faith is never alone. A changed life will accompany saving faith. The book of 1st John goes to great length to describe how we may know we have eternal life. The proof is in our actions.


#9

[quote=Xavier]Salvation through grace alone, by faith alone in Christ alone.

What do you disagree with?
[/quote]

Judas not only had faith in Jesus but he knew Jesus! Where did it get him?

Satan has faith in Jesus, he knows Jesus. Where did it get him?

The fallen angels had faith in Jesus and know him too. Where did it get them?

Faith alone does not give us salvation. Gods grace gives us salvation. Our 'F’aith justifies us for that grace. Jesus passes judgement on us to see if we get that salvation.

Short but to the point.


#10

[quote=Subrosa]So, hey Xavier - what’s your stand on this?

By the way, is your last name Onassis? yuk! LOL

Subrosa
[/quote]

No, wish I had their money:D


#11

Ephesians 2:8 - check my sig at the bottom, it says it all!


#12

[quote=awalt]Ephesians 2:8 - check my sig at the bottom, it says it all!
[/quote]

:blessyou:


#13

[quote=Malachi4U]Judas not only had faith in Jesus but he knew Jesus! Where did it get him?

Satan has faith in Jesus, he knows Jesus. Where did it get him?

The fallen angels had faith in Jesus and know him too. Where did it get them?

Faith alone does not give us salvation. Gods grace gives us salvation. Our 'F’aith justifies us for that grace. Jesus passes judgement on us to see if we get that salvation.

Short but to the point.
[/quote]

I would disagree.
Judas had no faith in Jesus. He was a thief and betrayed Jesus for money. His faith was in money.


#14

[quote=petra]Saving faith is never alone. A changed life will accompany saving faith. The book of 1st John goes to great length to describe how we may know we have eternal life. The proof is in our actions.
[/quote]

You can not possibly have faith in Christ and not have a changed life at the same time.


#15

[quote=Xavier]You can not possibly have faith in Christ and not have a changed life at the same time.
[/quote]

So one never sins after “getting saved”? :rolleyes:


#16

[quote=awalt]Ephesians 2:8 - check my sig at the bottom, it says it all!
[/quote]

Here is an excerpt from a Catholic article about this passage:

One passage Fundamentalists often cite as a prooftext against the Catholic view of salvation is Ephesians 2:8–9: “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God—not by works, so that no one can boast.” Though this passage can stymie Catholics in conversation, they need not feel threatened by it. Even if we assume that Paul is speaking of “good works” when he says we have not been saved by works, this in no way conflicts with Catholic theology.

Notice that the passage speaks of salvation in the past tense**—“you have been saved.”** In Greek this is the perfect tense, which denotes a past, completed action. We know from the Bible that salvation also has present and future aspects, so the kind of salvation Paul is discussing in Ephesians 2:8–9 is initial salvation. **It is the kind which we received when we first came to God and were justified, not the kind of salvation we are now receiving (1 Pet. 1:8–9, Phil. 2:12) or the kind we one day will receive (Rom. 13:11, 1 Cor. 3:15, 5:5).

**But **the Catholic Church does not teach that we receive initial justification by good works. You do not have to do good works in order to come to God and be justified. The Council of Trent states: “And we are said to be justified by grace because nothing that precedes justification, whether faith or works, merits the grace of justification. For ‘if it is by grace, it is no longer by works; otherwise,’ as the apostle says, ‘grace is no more grace’ [Rom. 11:6]” (Decree on Justification 8).

So even if Paul were using “works” to mean “good works” in Ephesians 2:8–9, there is no conflict with Catholic theology. However, Paul probably does not mean “good works.” Normally when he says “works,” he means "works of the Law"—those done out of the Law of Moses. His point is to stress that we are saved by faith in Jesus Christ and not by obeying the Mosaic Law.** Jews may not boast of having a privileged relationship with God because they keep the Mosaic Law and its requirement of circumcision (Rom. 2:6–11, 17–21, 25–29, 3:21–22, 27–30).
To read the entire article, please go here: catholic.com/thisrock/1997/9706chap.asp


#17

[quote=Church Militant]So one never sins after “getting saved”? :rolleyes:
[/quote]

Is that what I said, no. That is not what I said why do you have such difficulty in understanding what is said?


#18

[quote=Eden]Here is an excerpt from a Catholic article about this passage:

One passage Fundamentalists often cite as a prooftext against the Catholic view of salvation is Ephesians 2:8–9: “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God—not by works, so that no one can boast.” Though this passage can stymie Catholics in conversation, they need not feel threatened by it. Even if we assume that Paul is speaking of “good works” when he says we have not been saved by works, this in no way conflicts with Catholic theology.

Notice that the passage speaks of salvation in the past tense**—“you have been** saved.” In Greek this is the perfect tense, which denotes a past, completed action. We know from the Bible that salvation also has present and future aspects, so the kind of salvation Paul is discussing in Ephesians 2:8–9 is initial salvation. It is the kind which we received when we first came to God and were justified, not the kind of salvation we are now receiving (1 Pet. 1:8–9, Phil. 2:12) or the kind we one day will receive (Rom. 13:11, 1 Cor. 3:15, 5:5).

But **the Catholic Church does not teach that we receive *initial ***justification by good works. You do not have to do good works in order to come to God and be justified. The Council of Trent states: “And we are said to be justified by grace because nothing that precedes justification, whether faith or works, merits the grace of justification. For ‘if it is by grace, it is no longer by works; otherwise,’ as the apostle says, ‘grace is no more grace’ [Rom. 11:6]” (Decree on Justification 8).

So even if Paul were using “works” to mean “good works” in Ephesians 2:8–9, there is no conflict with Catholic theology. However, Paul probably does not mean “good works.” Normally when he says “works,” he means "works of the Law"—those done out of the Law of Moses. His point is to stress that we are saved by faith in Jesus Christ and not by obeying the Mosaic Law**. Jews may not boast of having a privileged relationship with God because they keep the Mosaic Law and its requirement of circumcision (Rom. 2:6–11, 17–21, 25–29, 3:21–22, 27–30).
To read the entire article, please go here: catholic.com/thisrock/1997/9706chap.asp
[/quote]

So when Jesus says all that the father gives to me, come to me and no one is able to take them out of my hand He does not mean what he is saying?


#19

Eden - your reply confuses me.

Ephesians seems pretty clear, that “by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God—not by works”. Works means good works, and Ephesians goes on to show that good works come from the building of Faith inside you. Works are an INDICATION of your faith; of course none of us can judge another, only God can. But the works are NOT what saves you, they are a BY-PRODUCT, or an INDICATOR that your faith is strong.

Why are the works important, and why does this truly mean Good Works? Because the works are the goal of God’s Salvation plan for us! He didn’t save us just to save us, He saved us because He loves us and because it is God’s Salvation Plan for us to Glorify God through Good Works that make us like Christ!

We are saved By Grace

We are saved through Faith (we have a choice)

We are saved for God’s works


#20

[quote=Xavier]Salvation through grace alone, by faith alone in Christ alone.

What do you disagree with?
[/quote]

If, by “faith alone” you mean a faith which is by definition accompanied by a willful carrying of one’s cross daily, and a willful cooperation with Christ, allowing Him to perform works of love through me, then neither I nor any Catholic has a problem with it.

If you mean faith accompanied only by spontaneous works not subject to one’s will…well…then you aren’t talking about a really “obedient” faith, which is the kind of faith through which we’re saved.

Peace.

John


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.