Some health insurance gets pricier as Obamacare rolls out


#21

Outcome so far of the Affordable Care Act, from the terrible website, to the increasing premiums, is the best advertisement against more government intervention into health care, which is what single payer is, than there could ever probably be. Not that I want to see people with rising health insurance costs but now people are seeing the reality of allowing an increased level of government into health insurance.:confused:


#22

Outcome so far of the Affordable Care Act, from the terrible website, to the increasing premiums, is the best advertisement against more government intervention into health care, which is what single payer is, than there could ever probably be. Not that I want to see people with rising health insurance costs but now people are seeing the reality of allowing an increased level of government into health insurance.:frowning:


#23

Outcome so far of the Affordable Care Act, from the terrible website, to the increasing premiums, is the best advertisement against more government intervention into health care, which is what single payer is, than there could ever probably be. Not that I want to see people with rising health insurance costs but now people are seeing the reality of allowing an increased level of government into health insurance.:rolleyes:


#24

Outcome so far of the Affordable Care Act, from the terrible website, to the increasing premiums, is the best advertisement against more government intervention into health care, which is what single payer is, than there could ever probably be. Not that I want to see people with rising health insurance costs but now people are seeing the reality of allowing an increased level of government into health insurance.


#25

No. Government, and the Insurance Companies that write the laws for them, heavily regulates and interferes with the Healthcare Industry. It’s been going on for decades. Medicare, Medicaid, Insurance regulation, reimbursement ceilings imposed by HHS…and the list goes on.

The only real free market in medicine remaining prior to the ACA (“Affordable” is a cynical jab in the American eye) was in cosmetic surgery, which most insurance companies will not cover (even reconstructive coverage was iffy for most companies).

And the cosmetic surgery practices, operating under free market rules, became cheaper, and improved quality of service (for the most part, and exceptions were punished in the marketplace and courts). Costs lowered, access increased.

If Congress and the Administration had not been constantly interfering with US healthcare in the decades preceding (and a certain party claiming it as a “right” like fascist Italy and Germany did in the 20s and 30s), then the majority of the reasons to implement the 0bamacare would not have been there in the first place.

When government enters into a market, the market becomes wildly distorted.

Healthcare is not a right. Healthcare has a cost. People pay one way or the other for it.

Government only adds cost to it, and the same could be said for Insurers. Costs added that do not improve access or delivery of a service and only serve to impoverish those needing the healthcare and those delivering the service.

One might ask, why were so many insurance and pharmaceutical companies involved in the writing of this bill that had to be passed so it could be read? What hogwash.

Welcome to fascist America…:tiphat:


#26

A better question would be, what happens when the doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals leave the industry due to reduced reimbursement and lack of protection of a conscience clause with regard to birth control/abortion/IV?

I know many that have left or are leaving their practice outright, retiring early, and some leaving the country to practice in a better economic environment.


#27

Yes, this ^^ :eek:


#28

AND this ^^^^, a HUNDRED times this ^^^^


#29

Correction - Should be: birth control/abortion/IVF and euthanasia


#30

I predict a great many physicians will retire early or change professions. Others will go to work for hospital corporations because being an employee with regular hours will be a lot simpler than trying to comply with all the regulations as a clinic owner or a private practice.

Others will be discouraged from even entering medical school.

And I predict that many physicians will transform their practices into concierge medical practices and not take any insurance at all, including Obamacare, Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance. But they will continue to do some charity work.


#31

:thumbsup: nice explanation.


#32

My favorite line out of it:

Fullerton resident Jennifer Harris thought she had a great deal, paying $98 a month for an individual plan through Health Net Inc. She got a rude surprise this month when the company said it would cancel her policy at the end of this year. Her current plan does not conform with the new federal rules, which require more generous levels of coverage.

Now Harris, a self-employed lawyer, must shop for replacement insurance. The cheapest plan she has found will cost her $238 a month. She and her husband don’t qualify for federal premium subsidies because they earn too much money, about $80,000 a year combined.

"It doesn’t seem right to make the middle class pay so much more in order to give health insurance to everybody else," said Harris, who is three months pregnant. “This increase is simply not affordable.”
But the real money quote comes from the San Jose Mercury News:

"Of course, I want people to have health care," Vinson said. "I just didn’t realize I would be the one who was going to pay for it personally."
I guess both these two thought that the money was going to come from Obama’s Stash

Where is that GIF of the World’s Smallest Violin Playing the World’s Saddest Song?


#33

Why did nobody expect this? Obamacare is precisely a shifting of cost (income, viewed another way) from one segment of the middle class to another segment. Always was. Always will be.


#34

Kind of a mixed signal from this post. I guess we were under as much of a free market as the government allowed.

It seems to me that we are on the same page in that we both believe less government intervention is called for rather than more.

I am I right or wrong in my interpretation of your response.:shrug:


#35

This is where Obamacare is driving us.

triblive.com/opinion/featuredcommentary/4933342-74/emr-obamacare-care#axzz2j1YTXX31


#36

Something to keep in mind. The Fed has kept interest rates abnormally low for years and years. First, it was Greenspan who (erroneously, he later admitted) thought he needed to fight deflation. Bernanke started to allow rates to rise, but then abandoned that when the mortgage/housing crisis became evident, and artificially lowered them again, and that’s where we have been for years now.

As a result, insurers can’t make money on their reserves, a significant part of the overall “financing” of health insurance. If they can’t make any money on reserves, premiums have to go up.

That’s not just something affecting insurance rates. It’s a huge wealth transfer from those who depend on fixed-rate returns to those who use cheap money to a) speculate in the case of individuals and corporations and b) to the government which now depends on it due to chronic overspending and inability to even pay the interest on the debt.

Obamacare, of course, makes it worse by further shifting income from that part of the middle class that is at or above the median income to those who are below it. All of the Obama talk about “helping the middle class” is simply a falsehood.


#37

Not only is it a pain for providers, and invites uttering falsehoods and speculations simply to get all the “green lights”, the whole thing is kind of creepy, in my judgment.

Where does all that data go, and to what end?

So, perhaps if the government finds out that cancer treatment for certain cancers has only a 10% chance for cure, and is expensive, what effect will that have on reimbursement policy?

What about adverse (real or claimed) effects of obesity? Family care providers are forced to record peoples’ BMI and the admonitions given to the person by the provider for any number of things, obesity being one of them. The government has already started shifting resources from “chronic care” to “well care”. So, when does a person become “chronic”, and what are the consequences of that?

It also puts a premium on reporting “appropriate” results from “evidence based medicine” approaches, essentially substituting statistical analyses for physician judgment, and reinforcing the former. How does a provider “fight the computer” in using judgment when he/she is punished if he/she does?


#38

Same as it ever was. Only government has been warping the fabric of healthcare in economically dangerous ways since LBJ (and likely long before going back to FDR).

It seems to me that we are on the same page in that we both believe less government intervention is called for rather than more.

More government will always mean more cost. They are the biggest cost driver around. They are catering to the lobbyists from Insurance, Pharma, etc, and the AMA (which is becoming irrelevant)

I am I right or wrong in my interpretation of your response.

I don’t see what’s mixed in signal, though I apologize for the soapbox routine, it’s been a sore subject for decades now and it’s finally heading to the place predicted 30 years ago.

Socialized Single Payer…for most. The elites and those inside the system will still get the best care money can provide…that’s why countries that have already socialized their healthcare have their wealthy and connected come here to be treated. Soon to change.

Soon to change.

I just call it like I see it and know it. :smiley:


#39

Soon there will be little to no middle class. The definition will become extinct.

There will only be those that have, and those that have not. This just helps pull that rug out a little faster.


#40

I doubt if that will happen soon. The foreign countries like to invest in corporate America probably a lot more than Americans do.


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