Something different- admirable qualities of other faiths


#1

Not stuff you necessarily agree with, so don’t think too hard.

[list]
*]JW- no hell
*]LDS and JW- dedicated and willing to “witness”.
*]Baptists- no dancing (great for white men), a church on every corner
[/list]


#2

Not to infer these are never present in Catholic communities, but:

Sense of fellowship, especially in outreach to young people (lacking in many Catholic parishes).

Sense of community: Taking care of their own (i.e. if someone loses a job, etc).

Lay persons involvement: i.e. Making building repairs, or landscaping, etc. by utilizing church members who are capable, instead of requiring a $200K fund raiser so as to hire a big union contractor to do the rennovation.


#3

Wednesday night pot lucks after Bible study.

Knowing EVERYONE on a first name basis, almost in a family sort of way. Knowing what their prayer needs are.

For kids: Youth group, Vacation Bible School, Sunday school, AWANA clubs (where kids memorize scripture.

:frowning: Am I allowed to say I miss all that??


#4

Yes! Of course!

The point was right on the mark. :slight_smile:

God bless you Carole Marie


#5

I’ve always thought the Mormons are particularly good with family values generally.


#6

[quote=carol marie]Wednesday night pot lucks after Bible study.

Knowing EVERYONE on a first name basis, almost in a family sort of way. Knowing what their prayer needs are.

For kids: Youth group, Vacation Bible School, Sunday school, AWANA clubs (where kids memorize scripture.

:frowning: Am I allowed to say I miss all that??
[/quote]

Carol Marie,
I too have fond memories of the above mentioned and yes I do miss those days…but I wouldn’t trade what I have now for all those happy moments! Just think, we can go talk to Jesus in the Tabernacle anytime and we have all the fellowship we want in the Communion of the Saints to name just a few pluses…but I can relate to those warm & fuzzy feeling of my childhood in the Baptist Church…God Bless,
Annunciata:)


#7

I guess I just wish we could have it all in the Catholic Church. Jesus and the fellowship of believers… with all the fun stuff that goes along with.


#8

[quote=carol marie]I guess I just wish we could have it all in the Catholic Church. Jesus and the fellowship of believers… with all the fun stuff that goes along with.
[/quote]

There is no reason why it couldn’t, it starts with us.

I remember visiting a Roman Catholic parish that was very small, tiny by today’s RC standards (perhaps not so tiny compared to many other churches). And it was just as you describe.

The town was small, and so was the church.

I can still remember when my cousin’s husband became a Catholic many years ago. We had a Mass in the most intimate setting, at the most 20 people. It was such a warm and emotionally inspiring setting that I have never forgotten it, although it must be 40 years now. This was in a large parish of several thousand people and I had never witnessed a Mass in such an intimate, community centered setting before then.

At one point in American Catholicism the idea was to build the grandest, most imposing structures possible for Roman Catholic churches, with schools. The parishes were erected just like Cathedrals, some had grade schools and high schools and they would have five or six masses on a Sunday in some places.

I remember a parish when I was young that had six priests assigned to it.

Saint Stanislaus Kostka parish (not far from St John Cantius in Chicago) at one time had 50,000 parishioners! This was almost 100 years ago. Most of those individuals originally came from little farm communities in Europe, with small country parishes, and when they got to Chicago they wanted a cathedral and dropped their hard-earned pennies in the basket to pay for one.

All of these things had an enormous impact on Catholic culture in the U.S.A. The church has been motoring along like this for over 100 years, but now the descendants of those immigrants have moved to the suburbs, and don’t know the people sitting next to them. The archdiocese doesn’t know any other way to organize a parish, plus there is a shortage of priests and schools are expensive to maintain.

Truth be told, that was one of the reasons I fell in love with the Eastern church. Few of their parishes are so big that you could not get to know most of the parishioners on a first-name basis. You cannot be anonymous in an Eastern parish, that idea bothers some people who just are not used to it.

So it is not a Catholic vs Protestant thing, unless some Catholics become dead-set against loving and interacting with their own fellow parishioners. The fact is, this is something we can change.


#9

Real church music by the great composers beautifully played and sung by competent, even gifted musicians, in a way that encourages congregational participation in various Lutheran, Methodist, Episcopal and other churches.

The active participation of the congregation in call and response style of preaching and singing in black churches and sense of the presence of the Spirit, and identification of the spiritual well-being of congregants and neighbors with meeting their daily needs for sustenance and justice. Not to mention the witness of King and other great civil rights leaders who arose from the black churches. (The biblical basis for which some black church leaders have sadly dropped in their quest for political influence).

Insistence on the reality and accessibility of the gifts and charisms of the Holy Spirit brought back into focus by Pentecostals.

Evangelical insistence on the validity of scripture as truth.

I firmly believe God allows all the various denominations to spring up and grow because each of them, even in the midst of error, preserves something crucial to the universal truth of the kingdom as it will exist in perfection when the church is truly ONE, some truth that sometimes for historical, political or other entirely human reasons gets overlooked in Catholic practice from time to time. I will never believe the solution to disunity lies in cutting off and attacking those separated, but in bringing them to unity through the love expressed in the Eucharist.


#10

[quote=Hesychios]… but now the descendants of those immigrants have moved to the suburbs, and don’t know the people sitting next to them.
[/quote]

Very true. I don’t even know the last names of many of my neighbors.


#11

Mormons for family values and helping others in the community.

Protestants: Emphasis on good preaching and scripture knowledge

Anglican - Liturgy and things like Vespers and all that beautiful music

Orthodox - Great liturgy, music , the educated clergy they have on a consistent basis and their knowledge of their own history

Jews - The emphasis on maintaining the cultural and religious traditions centered within the family and their history and their connectedness to one another. Their great works of community charity.


#12

Another for the Jehovah’s Witnesses: They don’t celebrate birthdays or Christmas.


#13

Church of Christ, Scientist - Christian Science Monitor is a great newspaper

Buddhist - shaven heads mean you never need to comb, shampoo, etc.

Scientology - haven’t read the L Ron Hubbard books, so I don’t know if they’re any good, but kinda cool to have a bunch of science fiction books based on your religion

Mormon - commitment to eating healthy, exercise, etc (although I could do without the no drinking policy)

Schismatic Catholic - you too can be a pope!

Shinto - very nice gardens

Lutheran - great composers

Various “Protestant work ethic” denominations - the attitude toward dignity of work by the laity wasn’t fully appreciated in our Church until this century, by the likes of Jose Maria Escriva and John Paul II.

Unification Church (Moonies) - mass wedding of many thousands of couples cuts down on your planning headaches


#14

[quote=puzzleannie]Real church music by the great composers beautifully played and sung by competent, even gifted musicians, in a way that encourages congregational participation in various Lutheran, Methodist, Episcopal and other churches.
[/quote]

The active participation of the congregation in call and response style of preaching and singing in black churches and sense of the presence of the Spirit, and identification of the spiritual well-being of congregants and neighbors with meeting their daily needs for sustenance and justice.

Ohhh, how I remember singing, how I miss singing. Your voice lost in the choir that was the entire congregation. From beautiful church music to Southern Gospel, I miss it all.

[quote=puzzleannie]Insistence on the reality and accessibility of the gifts and charisms of the Holy Spirit brought back into focus by Pentecostals.
[/quote]

Shortly after conversion, a “mission” came to our Parish. They were having a special service on Sunday Evening, and my son wanted to attend (the group had visited CCD classes and had the kids fired up). Well, we went, and I that was my first – and thus far only – experience with Charismatic Catholics. I so long for another chance to worship with Charismatic Catholics, but it looks like there are none in my area – I keep looking and praying!


#15

Someone posted JW’s don’t have a hell. My friend’s husband converted from RC to JW and he claims that those not chosen for heaven (the 144000) or for eternal life here on earth will be thrown into the lake of fire. I always interpreted that as their name for Hell. Does anyone know? A good thing about JWs and Mormons is they take care of their own. You get into financial trouble, need food, need a roof over your head and someone in the congregation will help.

Some good things about the Methodist church: Great hymns for the most part. Strong women’s organization (United Methodist Women) who are very active in the community. They also have a very well structured educational and reading program in both UMW and for the congregation. Methodists are into self improvement!!!
Love the people, love the church but just can’t deal with the equivocation on human life issues. Against the death penalty, won’t speak out against abortion. You know save the guilty, kill the innocent. John Wesley must be spinning in his grave along with his mom Susanna who had nineteen children.

LIsa N


#16

Hi Lisa N.

The JW’s “Lake of Fire” is the final, 2nd death for all those who reject the Jehovah’s Witness teaching the 2nd time around when they are ressurected from the dead and are taught the “truth.” If they don’t accept it, they are thrown into the lake of fire and burned up. They die, but are not tormented forever. Dead is dead. They don’t believe in “souls” - they only believe in the physical body so once you are dead, you return to the ground. They believe that all those who die before the Battle of Armegeddon will be ressurected (actually given a new body because the old one decayed) and that’s when they’ll have their 2nd chance. They translate the words sheol & hades to simply mean the grave - not hell as we know it.


#17

[quote=carol marie]Hi Lisa N.

The JW’s “Lake of Fire” is the final, 2nd death for all those who reject the Jehovah’s Witness teaching the 2nd time around when they are ressurected from the dead and are taught the “truth.” If they don’t accept it, they are thrown into the lake of fire and burned up. They die, but are not tormented forever. Dead is dead. They don’t believe in “souls” - they only believe in the physical body so once you are dead, you return to the ground. They believe that all those who die before the Battle of Armegeddon will be ressurected (actually given a new body because the old one decayed) and that’s when they’ll have their 2nd chance. They translate the words sheol & hades to simply mean the grave - not hell as we know it.
[/quote]

Wow, thank you for the info. I’m afraid to ask my friend’s husband about JW for fear I’ll never escape. He is definitely an enthusiastic convert! That sounds so complex. I know they are into looking into various Bible verses for prophecy and predicting the date of various events. It’s a very different religion IMO. But you can’t deny they are out there prostelytizing.

Lisa N


#18

[quote=carol marie]They believe that all those who die before the Battle of Armegeddon will be ressurected (actually given a new body because the old one decayed) and that’s when they’ll have their 2nd chance.
[/quote]

Don’t want to hijack this thread too far, but those what will be resurrected? If there’s no soul and the body’s decayed, what continues on to await resurrection or a new body?


#19

Peace be with you all,

I have been in ecumenical dialog with many Muslims over the last several years and I have to say I greatly admire their simple faith in God (Allah), their “physical prayer practice”, and their generousity and hospitality. After a year in dialog I recall one very learned scholar whom I know as Yusuf (Joseph) who started calling me by an Arabic name (Musadiq’allah) which translates into “He who is a friend of God”. I continue to engage them in dialog after three years and I find them to be very dear friends whom I continue to treasure to this day.

Peace, Love and Blessings,


#20

[quote=mark a]Another for the Jehovah’s Witnesses: They don’t celebrate birthdays or Christmas.
[/quote]

What’s wrong with celebrating birthdays and Christmas? And I don’t mean Consumermas I mean Christmas!


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