Something I have found that helps me


#1

I personally have incorporated some Buddhist practices into my Catholic life such as meditating. I have found that it gives me a better understanding of myself. I feel that when I combine prayer and meditation, it gives me a better outlook as far as what I'm praying for. It also gives me a sense of unity because in my belief, Buddhism and Catholicism are similar.


#2

Certainly, there are some similarities. Bishop Sheen discussed some of them in an article I read recently.


#3

See and that’s why. I have said numerous times that if I was not Catholic, I would be a Buddhist because Buddhism makes sense like Christianity.


#4

Buddhists did not invent meditation.

There is a world of difference between meditation in Buddhism and meditation in Catholicism. They have completely opposite ends. The Buddhist seeks to be lost in nothing, the Catholic seeks to be found in God.


#5

[quote="AnneElliot, post:4, topic:182359"]
Buddhists did not invent meditation.

There is a world of difference between meditation in Buddhism and meditation in Catholicism. They have completely opposite ends. The Buddhist seeks to be lost in nothing, the Catholic seeks to be found in God.

[/quote]

In a way you are correct. Buddhism did not invent meditation. However, I disagree with your perception of Buddhism and Catholicism. I am a practicing Roman Catholic but I also have interest in Buddhism. I have found that a Buddhist meditating is actually on the path to self-discovery. A Catholic such as myself practicing Buddhist meditation is also doing the same thing but also trying to gain a higher knowledge in which we have not found to satisfy our questions.


#6

Jesus Christ is the Way, the Truth, and the Life. The path to self-discovery is another path. It is a false path, not leading to Christ, but to ourselves (self-discovery). This is the opposite of what Jesus teaches. Christianity is a dying to ourselves, by following Him, and being raised to a new life in union with Him. Fr. Mitch Pacwa explains how Buddhism is not compatible with Catholicism.


#7

That is your opinion. Priests also think differently. Buddhism is a path to oneself you are correct, but one can balance themselves with Catholicism and Buddhism. Is religion not to explain what man cannot understand with his mind? Buddhism teaches you to find your inner meaning of life. Catholicism teaches you to have the faith that you can find your own inner meaning through Christ. They sound pretty compatible to me.


#8

[quote="runner93, post:7, topic:182359"]
That is your opinion. Priests also think differently. Buddhism is a path to oneself you are correct, but one can balance themselves with Catholicism and Buddhism. Is religion not to explain what man cannot understand with his mind? Buddhism teaches you to find your inner meaning of life. Catholicism teaches you to have the faith that you can find your own inner meaning through Christ. They sound pretty compatible to me.

[/quote]

It is not "your own inner meaning" but rather God's meaning.

One cannot be a Catholic and a Buddhist. I know you didn't quite say that you could. But the 2 faiths, while utilizing some comparable things, lead to diametrically opposite objectives: Buddhism seeks nirvana or nothingness, while the Catholic Church seeks a conscious eternity with God, in which even our bodies and world will in the end take part.

AIUI, if you take full adavantage of the tools of the Church, you will have no need for Buddhist practices.

[gets off soapbox]

God Bless and ICXC NIKA!


#9

[quote="GEddie, post:8, topic:182359"]
It is not "your own inner meaning" but rather God's meaning.

One cannot be a Catholic and a Buddhist. I know you didn't quite say that you could. But the 2 faiths, while utilizing some comparable things, lead to diametrically opposite objectives: Buddhism seeks nirvana or nothingness, while the Catholic Church seeks a conscious eternity with God, in which even our bodies and world will in the end take part.

AIUI, if you take full adavantage of the tools of the Church, you will have no need for Buddhist practices.

[gets off soapbox]

God Bless and ICXC NIKA!

[/quote]

Very excellent post! I look forward to our discussion about this! Now, in my opinion, it all depends on how one perceives God's message. One might perceive
God's meaning as to find oneself through meditation. I see where you're coming from though. However, one might perceive nirvana, or eternal happiness, as maybe heaven itself? I still will continue to live my Catholic with Buddhist influence life. I still go to Mass but who says I can't meditate for my own self-understanding!

God Bless You as well!


#10

Why in the world is this in the Traditional Catholicism forum????


#11

I had no idea where to put it haha :slight_smile:


#12

[quote="runner93, post:11, topic:182359"]
I had no idea where to put it haha :)

[/quote]

How about the "Non-Catholic Religions" forum perhaps?


#13

True but since I involved it with traditional Catholicism… :wink:


#14

[quote="runner93, post:13, topic:182359"]
True but since I involved it with traditional Catholicism... ;)

[/quote]

Incorporating Buddist practices with Catholicism has nothing to do with Traditional Catholicism. As one of the "Stickys" of this forum says:

"This is the Traditional Catholicism forum.** It is intended for the discussion of traditional Catholicism** not the practices of the Church today."


#15

[quote="ServantofMary, post:14, topic:182359"]
Incorporating Buddist practices with Catholicism has nothing to do with Traditional Catholicism. As one of the "Stickys" of this forum says:

"This is the Traditional Catholicism forum.** It is intended for the discussion of traditional Catholicism** not the practices of the Church today."

[/quote]

True. I am new to this forum, so I have no idea how to move things. Sorry!


#16

Rather than my opinion vs your opinion, the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith has addressed this:

Oct. 15, 1989: "Letter on Certain Aspects of Christian Meditation," cautioning Catholics about using Buddhist, Hindu and other meditation techniques that place the focus of prayer on the self rather than on God.

ewtn.com/library/CURIA/CDFMED.HTM


#17

\It also gives me a sense of unity because in my belief, Buddhism and Catholicism are similar.\

**Christianity believes in a personal God Who loves His creation so much He took on human nature, including a human body.

Buddhism, aside from not believing in a personal god at all, does not believe our human bodies are important.

Christianity looks to the Resurrection and glorification of our human bodies. Buddhism looks to be totally liberated from them.

So how are Budddhism and Catholicism similar?

Furthermore, when we say in the Creed, “I believe in one, holy, Catholic, and apostolic Church,” that means we believe that the teaching of the Church is complete, that she contains all that is needed for salvation within her, and we don’t have to go poking around outside of her for spiritual insights.**


#18

I don't know anything about Buddhist meditation techniques, but as a Catholic, we should include meditation as part of our prayer life.

Read a few lines of the Bible (or other religious writing) and then pause to reflect about their meaning. This opens us up to the Holy Spirit as a way to obtain a deeper understanding of the writing.

Peace,
John Marie Philomena


#19

Sorry to the Traditionists but the thread is in your space--a space invader!!Why would anybody want to substitute TRADITIONAL(there I justify myself) Christian and Catholic meditation for a "meditation technique" of a religion that though I respect has not the fullness of THRUTH. Traditional Catholic Meditation has Jesus as the focus of attention,Buddism centers on the VOID,emptying out of self, a sort of navel gazing.
There are similarities as both teach silent meditation but as I have pointed out they are like chalk and cheese.If it is done out of invincable ignorance (trying to combine the Catholic Beliefs and a sacramental life of Jesus-The God made flesh-- with Budda-the "Enlighted One") well God will not be punishing you for your self worship; but now that you know the truth stop doing it and practise TRADITIONAL catholic spirituallitywhich includes contemplation of God.


#20

[quote="bpbasilphx, post:17, topic:182359"]
\It also gives me a sense of unity because in my belief, Buddhism and Catholicism are similar.\

**Christianity believes in a personal God Who loves His creation so much He took on human nature, including a human body.

Buddhism, aside from not believing in a personal god at all, does not believe our human bodies are important.

Christianity looks to the Resurrection and glorification of our human bodies. Buddhism looks to be totally liberated from them.

So how are Budddhism and Catholicism similar?

Furthermore, when we say in the Creed, "I believe in one, holy, Catholic, and apostolic Church," that means we believe that the teaching of the Church is complete, that she contains all that is needed for salvation within her, and we don't have to go poking around outside of her for spiritual insights.**

[/quote]

To answer your question, one thing is that both Buddhism and Christianity ask us to forsake worldly things to either nirvana or to get to heaven.


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