Something Smells Fishy Here

Canadian and British scientists say herring make flatulent sounds at night and may be using them to talk to each other, according to CBC News.

The secret noises made by herring have become the subject of research by scientist Ben Wilson of the University of British Columbia Fisheries Centre in Vancouver and his British colleagues.

Researchers always knew herring have a heightened sense of hearing, but Wilson is looking into how herring squeeze bubbles out of swim bladders through an anal pore at night.

The result is a strange warbling that resembles flatulence and Wilson and his team are trying to get to the bottom of why they do it.

According to CBC News, the scientists say it appears the fishy noises are playing a social role, as they tend to make it mostly in the company of others.

Wilson said the naughty noise could also be intended to keep predators away or could just be a side effect of staying buoyant.

The fish flatulence study on herring, mostly found in the waters of the northern hemisphere, appeared in the Web issue of the Royal Society’s Biology Letters.

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Let’s not let the Bubbas of the world know about this unique form of communication or no one will be able to enter a pub/bar/saloon without “hearing” more than they ever wanted to hear! :stuck_out_tongue: :rotfl:

[quote=b_justb]Canadian and British scientists say herring make flatulent sounds at night and may be using them to talk to each other, according to CBC News.

The secret noises made by herring have become the subject of research by scientist Ben Wilson of the University of British Columbia Fisheries Centre in Vancouver and his British colleagues.

Researchers always knew herring have a heightened sense of hearing, but Wilson is looking into how herring squeeze bubbles out of swim bladders through an anal pore at night.

The result is a strange warbling that resembles flatulence and Wilson and his team are trying to get to the bottom of why they do it.

According to CBC News, the scientists say it appears the fishy noises are playing a social role, as they tend to make it mostly in the company of others.

Wilson said the naughty noise could also be intended to keep predators away or could just be a side effect of staying buoyant.

The fish flatulence study on herring, mostly found in the waters of the northern hemisphere, appeared in the Web issue of the Royal Society’s Biology Letters.

story ]
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Good one.

Remind me not to row my boat over a school of herring just when they are surprised.!!

Andy

This same phenomenon occurs in certain species of snakes. It is believed that the snakes use it as a defense behavior.

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