Sources for Biblical On-Line Commentary on Exodus


#1

I would appreciate any links to on-line commentaries on the Book of Exodus. I am familiar with Haydock’s but are there any other Catholic commentaries or early Church commentaries available on-line?

PnP


#2

This link should help: St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology


#3

Nowadays, a good commentary involves a lot of intellectual property and hard work, like translating the early church fathers. I’m building a set of just that, commentaries of the works of early church fathers on all the books of the Bible. They’re $29 a book, and I’m up to about 22 volumes, so far. (I’ve read most of them, also). That involves a LOT of translation from Greek and Latin, as well as a lot of editing to synchronize the line-by-line commentaries.

The Jewish Publication Society Commentary on Exodus runs around $75, which I bought at the time, at 40% discount. Comedian Steven Black (who is apparently Jewish) made a joke about how Christians get the Bible “all wrong.” He says we’ll tell you what it really means, but it’ll cost yah. He wasn’t kidding.

Dr. Tim Gray did a series on EWTN on the books of Exodus. It was really great. I think it’s available on the EWTN website or perhaps at the Augustine Institute where he is a scholar. price?

The Jewish Study Bible from Oxford Press is less than $30, which is a Jewish commentary on the Hebrew Bible.

Evidently cost is a factor to you (as it is to us all). Do you need the whole thing? or, is there something specific you’re interested in?

I think the Protestant Matthew Henry commentary is online, if you wanted to look at that.
That was written in the 18th Century.

Depending on where you live, your local public library may have a set of commentaries, like the Anchor Bible series, which is authored by various Catholic and non-Catholic scholars.

you might try googling on a verse from Exodus such as “commentary on Exodus Chapter One” and see what you get.


#4

I don’t know how much reading you want to do in this regard, but the Pulpit Commentaries are at Archive.org:

archive.org/details/cu31924098499506 (Exodus - Vol. 1)

archive.org/details/cu31924098499514 (Exodus - Vol. 2)

While fetching those, I noticed another book that looked interesting, though only one volume of the set is on the list (I checked the others that weren’t marked):

((–v. 1. The Creed – v. 2. The Commandments – v. 3. The means of grace – v. 4. The liturgy of the church; with an index of subjects of the complete work.))

“A Pulpit commentary on Catholic teaching; a complete exposition of Catholic doctrine, discipline and cult in original discourses (Volume 1)”

archive.org/details/pulpitcommentary01newyiala

Editor’s Note: The Encyclical of His Holiness, Pius X, in which he so strongly insists upon Catechising as one of the chief duties of the priesthood, has induced the publication of this Series….Here are to be found assembled, carefully and forcefully developed and aptly illustrated and applied, the arguments sanctioned by the Church and tested by experience, which form necessarily the essential part of the definition and defense of Christian doctrine.


#5

My website of the Aquinas Study Bible on the link below has many commentaries for every book of the Bible.


#6

Thank you all for your helpful references.

PnP


#7

Copland 3: I don’t belong to Facebook (!).

In the John Gospel Harmony part of the AqSB, is this sentence

IN THIS, HOWEVER, [IT IS TO BE UNDERSTOOD THAT] HE DOES NOT REPEL HER OF WHOM HE RECEIVED THE FLESH, BUT MEANS TO CONVEY THE CONCEPTION OF HIS DIVINITY WITH SPECIAL FITNESS AT IBIS TIME, WHEN HE IS ABOUT TO CHANGE THE WATER INTO WINE; WHICH DIVINITY, LIKEWISE, HAD MADE THAT WOMAN, AND HAD NOT ITSELF BEEN MADE IN HER.

What is IBIS TIME? Why don’t you take personal messages?


#8

I tried to read the supplementary commentary on John’s gospel, but it was impossible to read, with a font size of 7.5 to begin with. Then, the text was all in capital letters, which is not a modern standard of printing, because it is so hard to read. Then, what I was reading turned out to be an un-modernized essay from St. Augustine.

The text did not have “white space” in it, which also makes it difficult to read. The gospel language itself was archaic, and the text was mostly a paraphrase of the gospel.

In the Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture (from Intervarsity Press) the texts have been modernized into contemporary 21st century American “English.” In general, there, I love most the comments of Augustine, but here I wouldn’t have recognized it as Augustine until you told me that it was Augustine.

But ---- it’s online, and it’s free, I guess.


#9

Post me a link to what you are talking about. You can email me at jlitteral29@gmail.com


#10

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.