Southern Baptist getting Married to Catholic


#1

Hello, I am first and foremost a Christian who knows Jesus Christ as my Lord and Savior. I affiliate myself with the Southern Baptist Church. I have not always been affiliated with the Southern Baptist Church. My Father and his side of the family are all Catholics and there is even a Priest in the family. My Mother and her family are Pentecostal. When we lived near my father’s side of the family we went to Catholic Church and when we lived near my mom’s side of the family we went to Pentecostal Church. On the other hand, when we lived by neither side of the family, I was the only one to continue to go to church. I would attend a Baptist Church. I was first drawn to the church as a child because my friends went to the church. Later on in my youth, I came to know Jesus as my Lord and Savior and became a passionate seeker of GOD. I wanted to know more and to grow my relationship with him. My beliefs align with that of the Southern Baptist Church; however, I respect the Catholic Church and their beliefs. I am presently engaged to a wonderful woman who I know God sent to me. She is Catholic and has been raised Catholic her entire Life. There are so many things beliefs we share and a few we do not. Those few however, are those which need to be covered prior to marriage. I know a marriage takes three, God, the Groom, and the Bride. I also know the Husband is to be the Spiritual Leader of the household. I plan to be the Spiritual Leader of our Household. I will love her as Christ Loves the Church.

Right now I attend Mass with her every Saturday like I have been since we met and she attends Sunday service with me when she is not working. On the issues we differ on we simply agree to disagree. I know that may not last forever which is why I am asking for advice. She has told me she would love for me to convert to Catholicism; however, she knows I am where God wants me to be right now. I teach Sunday school to first graders and love to see the look in their eyes as they learn about Jesus and God. I sometimes think about what troubles my fiancee and I will face when we have our own children. I know by getting married in the Catholic Church she is morally bound to raise our children Catholic and go through the Sacraments, however, I am not Catholic and would want my children to know the Baptist Traditions as well. I would love to teach them both, however, I do not want to confuse them. I know they already will see their dad never go up to receive communion and wonder why. I have went to GOD and prayed over this. I know without a shadow of doubt God wants us to be together and I believe he will make this work. I am just not sure how it will. I do not want this to drive a wedge in our relationship and our Journey to become closer to God.

Any advice will be greatly accepted.


#2

Do you understand why you do not take communion?

I have an article on my blog that might shed some light on this for you and we can go from there, okay?

The Eucharist IS Scriptural


#3

That is the thing, I believe and embrace the Eucharist and it is something I agree with the Catholic Church. I however was told by a Priest that because I am not Catholic and do not accept all of the Catholic Teachings, I cannot receive the Eucharist. I believe Jesus wants those who believe in him and the Eucharist to take part in communion yet I am denied because I am not Catholic.:( By having a part of my childhood in the Catholic Church I know more than the average Baptist and agree with a lot of the same things as the Catholic Church. I just feel that no one who knows Jesus Christ as their personal Lord and Savior as well as believes and embraces the Eucharist should be denied communion.


#4

If you believe in the Eucharist than you need to be Catholic as the Catholic Church (and the Churches in communion) is the only Church with a valid Eucharist as it is the only Church with a valid priesthood. If you are not receiving Eucharist from a valid priest who has received the Sacrament of Holy Orders than you are not receiving anything but wine and bread.

I will also say that part of this too is that in becoming a member - (since you have been baptized I am assuming) - you would be confirmed you are agreeing to honor precepts - this is not just about taking Eucharist - it is about being in communion with a Body of Christ. This is a communion that Martin Luther severed upon his communication when he started his own Church that lead to several(and I use this term loosely) others. Yes the faiths have a lot in common - but the members are not in communion with each other as they do not share the Sacramental Body. The way to do this is to share the Sacraments. Sacraments such as baptism, confirmation, and Holy orders leave an indellible mark on the soul. Once a Catholic basically always a Catholic. It is very different. There is no leaving and going to another denomination - if you do not continue to follow the precepts this places one in a state of sin.

Now I am throwing this out - maybe you want to take a look at Scott Hahn’s conversion story. He thought he was Protestant as well - but as he started making his faith journey (and I believe he was a minister) he realized as much as he did not want to be Catholic he already was. You see many misunderstandings and disagreements with the Catholic faith are based on misinterpretations of what the faith actually is. I say this as someone who did convert. It is very hard to argue Scriptural interpretation with the Church that Canonized the Bible 1300 years prior to your own Faith existing - (this is assuming that the NT was fully Canonized at the Council of Nicea around AD and I am giving you the Baptist Faith being formed in the 1600s.) Just some food for thought.

So what are your arguments?


#5

But that’s where the rub comes in. Would you have people bear false witness? That is what would happen if we had open communion because if we are teaching the correct doctrine as to the Eucharist then anyone not sharing that belief would be bearing witness to something that they do really believe. This is also why I cannot take communion if your faith community because I believe in the Real Presence and not some symbolic error.

Just something for you to consider…and I agree with the poster above who said you should be Catholic if you really believe that. BTW, here’s My Testimony

Now…Let’s move on to anything that you believe is keeping you from coming home to the Catholic faith. What can’t you believe that you disagree with your fiance about?


#6

I was baptized in the Baptist Church. I believe man was created in the image and likeness of God. By choice man chose to sin and disobey God and is by inherited nature, born in sin, and sinful. Being born in sin man is alienated from a relationship with God, and is under the condemnation of God with no means of salvation within himself. ( Gen 1:27; 2:17; 3:6; Ps. 51:5; 58:3; Rom 3:23; 5:12-21; I Corin. 2:14; Gal 3:11 ). I believe the Bible teaches the assembling together of Baptized, immersed, believers that worship the Lord in Spirit and truth, in unity and harmony, and without confusion. Each Church is to carry out the “Great Commission” and observe Baptism by immersion, and the taking of the Lord’s Supper. (Acts 2:38, Acts 16: 30-33 1st Corin. 11:23 – 32, I Corin 12:13; Eph 1:22, 23; 4:11-15; Gal 1:22). I do not believe I have to go to a Priest for confession. I believe (I Timothy 2:5) I can go to God through Jesus and confess my sins. "Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved." Acts 4:12 I believe in salvation by grace alone through faith in Christ, apart from works. God loves man enough, “in that while we were yet sinners Christ died for us”. Man’s salvation / redemption was purchased by the Blood of the Lord Jesus Christ on the cross of Calvary. Christ paid the sin debt for man by his vicarious death. Man’s only obligation is to admit his helplessness in his sin nature, repent of his sins, and by faith trust solely in the finished work of the cross and the resurrection of the Lord Jesus. Salvation cannot be earned, it is the “gift of God” to all those that will freely accept it. ( Eph. 2:8, 9; Titus 3:5; Jn 1:12; 3:14, 10:28, 29; Rom 8:1; Phil 1:6; II Pet 3:9; I Jn 2:2; I Corin 15: 1 - 4; Rev 22:17 ). I believe those that trust in the Death, Burial, and Resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ are “sealed unto the day of redemption” and eternally saved. (Jn 3:8; Gal 3:24 - 26; I Jn 5: 11-13; Jn 3:16; Jn 6:36-40). I do not believe in Purgatory. I believe the Bible teaches there is a literal Heaven being prepared for the saints of God and a literal Hell for those that reject the Lord Jesus. ( Jn. 14:1-6, Matt 31 - 34; Rev. 20:11 - 15; Matt 25:41, 45, 46; Luke 16:19-31 )


#7

Dear brother.

Thanks for joining us here at CAF.
I think you are so blessed to have found a woman you match with.
Christ will be the center and if you evangelize your children so they have a personal relationship with Jesus then that is most important.
Its great that you are seeking answers. I hope both you and your fiancee will study on the tradition and beliefs of the other, let it not be a one way thing.
I converted into the Catholic Church some years ago. And I believe in my heart that this is the right place.. that it is my home, however I do recognize that I rushed. I believed in the Eucharist and was so thirsty for it, but now years later, I still struggle alot with certain Catholic practises that I think are stiffling the believers. I realize that I am still very much influenced by my protestant background and.. whole protestant culture really.
Being somehow split I often feel alientated and bad like I don't belong anywhere, but what I feel right now is that I need both an Evangelical Church and Catholic Church to edify me (unless I can find that Catholic Charismatic Church I dream about)..
I respect southern baptists for their Christo-centric practices.. I heard some talks by Paul Washer, and although I do not agree with some of his doctrines I think he is great at preaching and we could use some of that preaching-zeal in our church.
So.. my advice. Study long and hard, pray on it, and go and observe. Do not rush.
CAF is a good place to start.
You might also wanna get yourself a copy of the catechism, and read some saint biographies..

Peace and Shalom


#8

jetgop, I'm going to say some hard things here. I hope that someday you will remember my words and thank God that you listened to me.

It's my opinion that if you love her, you will let her go so that she can marry a committed Catholic man. It will not be easy, but love isn't easy.

I've been married 32 years this June. My husband and I were Protestant until 2004, when we converted together to Catholicism because after several years of study, we decided that the Catholic Church is the Church that Jesus Christ founded.

Marriage is becoming ONE with your spouse. That is what God intended for marriage--you are to be a picture of Christ and His Church to the world. A married couple is a living Gospel message.

You and the woman you love will never be able to become one because the difference in religion will always be between you. Unless you convert, you will never experience with her the joys of the Catholic Church. There will always be a disconnect in this one area.

Certainly it's possible and healthy for married couples to retain separate interests. My husband is an ice dancer, and I am not. I play piano and he does not. He's a technophile, and I am definitely helpless in this area! I write novels, while he has a hard time writing a post card.

But Christian faith is not an "interest," and the Catholic Church is not just another denomination. The Church makes the claim to be the Church that Jesus Christ founded. By being Protestant, you are denying that claim. How can your marriage be a picture of Christ and His Church when there is this lack of unity between you and your wife? Christianity is not factions or divisions, but being One in Christ. Protestants do not believe that this "unity" is a real unity; they believe it is spiritual and esoteric. But that's not what Jesus taught.

Above all else, I would challenge you to begin studying and take a real, hard, educated look at the claims of the Catholic Church. You believe in Jesus, don't you? He claimed to be God--quite an audacious claim, and when people today claim to be God or even a god, we don't believe them. But for some reason, you believe in Jesus and accept His claim to be God. What is that reason? I'm guessing it's because you studied the Bible and/or examined the evidence for Jesus's Divinity, and you made a mindful decision that Jesus is Who He claims to be--God.

Do the same thing with the Catholic Church. This Church claims to be THE Church of Christ. So delve into this claim. Examine it. Study it.

I hope that after doing so, you will come to the conclusion that the Catholic Church is who she claims to be--the Church of Christ.

But until you are Catholic, I hope that you will allow your beloved to be free to find and marry a Catholic man, and raise a Catholic family. In many cases (not all), when a Protestant marries a Catholic, it is the Catholic who usually bends over the years and eventually slides into the Protestant church. It's just so much easier (on the surface anyway) to be Protestant. The music is better, there are more children's and youth programs, and often the people are a lot friendlier.

Don't do this to your wife, please.

I know these are hard words. I hope you will ponder them and not just reject them outright.

Godspeed to you and your beloved.


#9

Jetgop, I think you are with one foot in the Baptist Church, one foot in the Catholic Church, as far as your faith goes now. If you believe the Eucharist is truly Jesus Christ, not just some symbol, then you must be painfully aware that your Baptist Church made a terrible mistake by doing away with the Eucharist. I mean, Christ solemnly instituted the Eucharist and instructed the Apostles to continue doing this. So, anyone who stopped following Christ's instruction, made a terrible mistake. But the problem is, you are an official member of a Church that officially rejects that the Eucharist is Christ's Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity. Due to your membership in a Church that rejects the Eucharist, you cannot partake in the Eucharist when you attend Mass in a Catholic Church. Just as a curiosity I will mention to you that there are other Churches such as the Eastern Orthodox (EO) and Oriental Orthodox (OO), who split from the Catholic Church in the 11th and 5th centuries respectively, and they do have a valid priesthood who can consecrate a valid Eucharist, and they believe that Christ is truly present in the Eucharist, just like we Catholics do. When these EO and OO Christians come to our Catholic Mass, they are allowed to present themselves for Holy Communion, if they are properly disposed (confessed sins, no mortal sins since last confession). So, you see, it boils down to being member of a Church that itself has a valid Eucharist, and believes in the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist. Although we Catholics have an extremely serious disagreement with those EO and OO Christians, namely they reject the notion of Papacy as the Catholic Church teaches it, yet they are welcome to Holy Communion in our churches because of our identical doctrine on the Eucharist. I hope this gives you a better idea of who is allowed to participate in the Eucharist in Catholic Churches, and why some non-Catholic Christians are allowed to participate, while others are asked to refrain from Communion. :)

I forgot to mention the Anglican Church. They do believe in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist. Yet, when an Anglican person comes to attend Mass in a Catholic Church, they are being asked to refrain from Holy Communion. Why? Because they have no valid Apostolic Succession, and no valid Priesthood. A valid priest is someone with a direct lineage back to the original 12 Apostles. In other words, if I wanted to become a priest, I could not validly start proclaiming that I am a priest now, just because I decided so. I must be ordained a priest by someone who was validly ordained himself, someone who is in the Apostolic Succession of the original 12 Apostles. From the Catholic perspective, the Anglican Church has no validly ordained priests, and therefore no valid Eucharist - because only a valid priest can consecrate a valid Eucharist. And for this reason, although Anglican Christians do believe in the Real Presence, they are asked to refrain from Communion, because they are members of a Church that has no valid Eucharist.


#10

However a membef of the EO Churches who received Communion in a Catholic Church would automatically excommunicate themselves and norw would you be likely to find an Orthodox priest who would allow a Catholic to receive the Eucharist in an Orthodox Church. Which is as it should be as otherwise the Orthodox would lack integrity or adherence to their own theology.


#11

[quote="JharekCarnelian, post:10, topic:233844"]
However a membef of the EO Churches who received Communion in a Catholic Church would automatically excommunicate themselves and norw would you be likely to find an Orthodox priest who would allow a Catholic to receive the Eucharist in an Orthodox Church. Which is as it should be as otherwise the Orthodox would lack integrity or adherence to their own theology.

[/quote]

Yes, most Eastern Orthodox people will not present themselves for Holy Communion in a Catholic Church. But it's not because the Catholic Church forbids them to do so. It's because their own EO Church forbids them to commune in a Catholic Church.


#12

[quote="Joseph_L_Varga, post:11, topic:233844"]
Yes, most Eastern Orthodox people will not present themselves for Holy Communion in a Catholic Church. But it's not because the Catholic Church forbids them to do so. It's because their own EO Church forbids them to commune in a Catholic Church.

[/quote]

As I said quite rightly so as otherwise the EO Churches would fail to have any intellectual honesty or integrity in regards to their own teachings. Indeed the Orthodox are discouraged from communing in Catholic Churches due to the penalties they incur as a result and are encourage to follow the authority of their Church in this matter.

I would never dream of attempting to present myself to receive the Eucharist in my wife's Church and I understand why the priest will not allow me to receive.


#13

Jet, I think the best thing for you to do is to enroll in the adult catechism at her Catholic church (RCIA), not to convert, but to get more information about the Bilblical nature of all the Catholic sacraments. Then you will be more comfortable with your kids receiving them.

I do agree that a family is ore harmonious if the dad and mom are incomplete agreement in faith. Most of the adults I know who think church is optional grew up in families where dad believed one thing and mom believed another.

Most of the beliefs you said you have are in accord with Catholic Christianity.

Confessing sins to another person is in James 5:16. Priests enabled to pronounce us absolved from our sins by the blood of Jesus is in John 20:21-23, and when we go to confession we are confessing our sins directly to The Lord, the priest facilitates but does not usurp Christ’s role as our one and only Redeemer.

Baptism by immersion is an option for Catholics, but it’s not always practical.what do you do in a desert? Or where the water is contaminated? Deny person baptism? The Bible does not specify a minimum quantity of water.

Catholics agree in salvation by faith in Christ, no works required to get saved, but works are an appropriate response of gratitude. We go onestep farther in “man’s helplessness” and say that a person cannot even control their own reception of saving grace by following a formula of admitting they are a sinners and accepting Christ. Rather, we believe that the saving is 100 percent Jesus’ doing, which is why we believe He willingly saves people of any age, including infants.

Purgatory is a biblical concept if you think about it. We’re all sinners, right? We all die as sinners. But nothing unclean can enter heaven. That means sometime between the moment of death and our entrance into heaven, the Blood of our Savior is applied to our souls, washing us whiter than snow. That’s what purgatory is, the final purging of all sin from our souls. It might take a split second, or it might take a long period of time - nobody knows. But it must happen. Scripture demands it.

I really think with ore education about Catholicism for you and more about Southern Baptist theology for her, you can make this work.


#14

[quote="jetgop, post:1, topic:233844"]
Hello, I am first and foremost a Christian who knows Jesus Christ as my Lord and Savior. I affiliate myself with the Southern Baptist Church. I have not always been affiliated with the Southern Baptist Church. My Father and his side of the family are all Catholics and there is even a Priest in the family. My Mother and her family are Pentecostal. When we lived near my father’s side of the family we went to Catholic Church and when we lived near my mom’s side of the family we went to Pentecostal Church. On the other hand, when we lived by neither side of the family, I was the only one to continue to go to church. I would attend a Baptist Church. I was first drawn to the church as a child because my friends went to the church. Later on in my youth, I came to know Jesus as my Lord and Savior and became a passionate seeker of GOD. I wanted to know more and to grow my relationship with him. My beliefs align with that of the Southern Baptist Church; however, I respect the Catholic Church and their beliefs. I am presently engaged to a wonderful woman who I know God sent to me. She is Catholic and has been raised Catholic her entire Life. There are so many things beliefs we share and a few we do not. Those few however, are those which need to be covered prior to marriage. I know a marriage takes three, God, the Groom, and the Bride. I also know the Husband is to be the Spiritual Leader of the household. I plan to be the Spiritual Leader of our Household. I will love her as Christ Loves the Church.

Right now I attend Mass with her every Saturday like I have been since we met and she attends Sunday service with me when she is not working. On the issues we differ on we simply agree to disagree. I know that may not last forever which is why I am asking for advice. She has told me she would love for me to convert to Catholicism; however, she knows I am where God wants me to be right now. I teach Sunday school to first graders and love to see the look in their eyes as they learn about Jesus and God. I sometimes think about what troubles my fiancee and I will face when we have our own children. I know by getting married in the Catholic Church she is morally bound to raise our children Catholic and go through the Sacraments, however, I am not Catholic and would want my children to know the Baptist Traditions as well. I would love to teach them both, however, I do not want to confuse them. I know they already will see their dad never go up to receive communion and wonder why. I have went to GOD and prayed over this. I know without a shadow of doubt God wants us to be together and I believe he will make this work. I am just not sure how it will. I do not want this to drive a wedge in our relationship and our Journey to become closer to God.

Any advice will be greatly accepted.

[/quote]

You might want to take a look at the Catholic teachings about marriage, sex, contaception, and abortion before agreeing to disagree. A marriage that disagrees on sex is doomed from the git-go whereas a marriage that disagrees about the nature of the eucharist is very survivable.

Best wishes.


#15

Another very harmful thing that happens in mixed marriages is that the non-Catholic spouse will criticize the elements of the faith in front of the children, thus undermining any catechesis that the Catholic spouse is attempting. To have a parent criticize the Church is very powerfully subversive.

I know, because my cradle Catholic husband has been very critical of most of the elements of the Church since I reverted 20 years ago. thankfully one of our sons is still a faithful Catholic but the younger one, who picks up on these sorts of things, no longer attends Mass at all.

And I am sorry to say that I joined my husband in some of the criticism without really realizing what I was doing. My husband tears down our priest and scoffs at the idea of needing confession. The priest is a difficult one and it can be fun to critique him but that is something I deeply regret doing in front of the children. My husband is super-critical anyway and when one is around that type of person, it's easy to fall into that mode of acting - it becomes a habit that one almost doesn't recognize.

Just the criticism of certain tenets can be very harmful to the parent who is trying to instill the faith in the children. Even if the non-Catholic attends Mass, the criticism will have a deleterious effect.


#16

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:15, topic:233844"]
Another very harmful thing that happens in mixed marriages is that the non-Catholic spouse will criticize the elements of the faith in front of the children, thus undermining any catechesis that the Catholic spouse is attempting. To have a parent criticize the Church is very powerfully subversive.

I know, because my cradle Catholic husband has been very critical of most of the elements of the Church since I reverted 20 years ago. thankfully one of our sons is still a faithful Catholic but the younger one, who picks up on these sorts of things, no longer attends Mass at all.

And I am sorry to say that I joined my husband in some of the criticism without really realizing what I was doing. My husband tears down our priest and scoffs at the idea of needing confession. The priest is a difficult one and it can be fun to critique him but that is something I deeply regret doing in front of the children. My husband is super-critical anyway and when one is around that type of person, it's easy to fall into that mode of acting - it becomes a habit that one almost doesn't recognize.

Just the criticism of certain tenets can be very harmful to the parent who is trying to instill the faith in the children. Even if the non-Catholic attends Mass, the criticism will have a deleterious effect.

[/quote]

Excellent points, many of which I see in my former self and also regret. Fortunately, God smacked me upside the head with a 2x4 while my kids were too young to pick up on my negativity and self rightiousness.


#17

[quote="Sparki777, post:13, topic:233844"]
Jet, I think the best thing for you to do is to enroll in the adult catechism at her Catholic church (RCIA), not to convert, but to get more information about the Bilblical nature of all the Catholic sacraments. Then you will be more comfortable with your kids receiving them.

[/quote]

I agree completely with this sentiment. Not intending to pressure you to convert, but clearly you are a thoughtful person who seeks to serve Christ. RCIA would be helpful in helping you understand more deeply the Catholic Church, and why she teaches what she teaches (about the 'closed' Eucharist, etc.).

Most importantly, pray. I will pray for you too. Don't be afraid to go where the Holy Spirit leads you. If RCIA helps lead you to conversion, then go with it. If it doesn't, then it will still be a useful educational experience for you and help you in understanding your future wife's (and your future children's) faith.

If you stay in the Southern Baptist tradition, there is no harm in letting your children experience elements of your faith...but it will have to be done in a way that doesn't intentionally undermine their Catholic upbringing. If they choose, in later years, to switch to your faith that is their decision...but your future wife, as a Catholic, is bound to raise them in the Church, and you are bound by your vows to her to support her in that and not work against her.

God bless you. Keep learning the faith, and go where the Spirit leads you.


#18

[quote="jetgop, post:3, topic:233844"]
That is the thing, I believe and embrace the Eucharist and it is something I agree with the Catholic Church. I however was told by a Priest that because I am not Catholic and do not accept all of the Catholic Teachings, I cannot receive the Eucharist. I believe Jesus wants those who believe in him and the Eucharist to take part in communion yet I am denied because I am not Catholic.:( By having a part of my childhood in the Catholic Church I know more than the average Baptist and agree with a lot of the same things as the Catholic Church. I just feel that no one who knows Jesus Christ as their personal Lord and Savior as well as believes and embraces the Eucharist should be denied communion.

[/quote]

Communion is part of our intimate spousal relationship with God. Communion is often compared with marital relations. We as Catholics understand the act of communion to be that intimate. Christ communing with us in a singularly almost physical way that is expressed in marriage as the intimate physical love in the marital union. You know from scripture that we have a spousal relationship with Christ. Bridegroom and Bride( which is the Church ). Spousal relationships are exclusive. Each spouse belongs only to the other spouse. To have a relationship , especially as deeply intimate a relationship with another is adultery. That is what you want the church to do for you. You want to have your relationship with the Baptist faith and then go have intimate relations with Christ at the Catholic Church. It can be compared to adultery. You want the communion but not the obligations or other acts of fidelity to the spouse which is the church.

St . Paul says "Therefore whosoever shall eat this bread, or drink the chalice of the Lord unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and of the blood of the Lord." The church is protecting you from that. You have not been cleansed of your sins by confession. You do not properly discern the body. St Paul also says " A person should examine himself, %between% and so eat the bread and drink the cup.For anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body, eats and drinks judgment on himself." We do not want you to bring judgment on yourself.

If you truly believe in the Eucharist and where it comes from as well as why it is entrusted to only those with Apostolic Succession , then you have got to start digging deep into your conscience and figure out why you are holding onto the Baptist traditions .

Praying for you Brother.


#19

By the way I apologize ahead of time - I did not want my earlier post to be at all pressuring just to provoke thought and discussion. You seem very intelligent so I figured you wouldn’t mind.:wink:


#20

[quote="jetgop, post:6, topic:233844"]
I was baptized in the Baptist Church. I believe man was created in the image and likeness of God. By choice man chose to sin and disobey God and is by inherited nature, born in sin, and sinful. Being born in sin man is alienated from a relationship with God, and is under the condemnation of God with no means of salvation within himself. ( Gen 1:27; 2:17; 3:6; Ps. 51:5; 58:3; Rom 3:23; 5:12-21; I Corin. 2:14; Gal 3:11 )

[/quote]

Okay...so we pretty much share the belief in Original Sin, right?

I believe the Bible teaches the assembling together of Baptized, immersed, believers that worship the Lord in Spirit and truth, in unity and harmony, and without confusion.

Again...where does this differ from Catholic teaching? My only question would be that if there never was any confusion, then why would there be the church that Our Lord built? Someone has to be in authority and that's precisely what the Bible teaches and the Catholic Church follows. However, with many thousands of faith communities having sprung up in the last 500 years, I don't believe that the same can be said of the modern post reformation communities.

Each Church is to carry out the “Great Commission” and observe Baptism by immersion, and the taking of the Lord’s Supper.

The Catholic Church has been following that commission for 2,000 years. Nowhere in the New Testament or the early church writings (see the Didache) does it teach that baptism must be by immersion only and you cannot provide unequivocal scriptural proof of it. Look at the Philippian jailer in Acts 16:25-33 and note verse 33 especially which says, "And he, taking them the same hour of the night, washed their stripes, and himself was baptized, and all his house immediately."

They sure as vitam aeternam didn't run down to the river in the middle of the night with his whole family, so...was St. Paul wrong? Or is modern Southern Baptist doctrine?

Moreover, SBs do not teach that baptism is necessary to salvation yet that is not what the Word of God actually says.

[LIST]
]Who REALLY Preaches "A Different Gospel"?
*]Baptism~ Necessary or Not?
*]The Case For Infant Baptism
*]The Necessity of Baptism (Fathers
)
[/LIST]
We've already established that SB doctrine on communion is in error and I will add this link to an informative article from my blog as to the sacraments. (most of which the SB do not accept. "I Find No Sacraments In the Bible" he said.

I do not believe I have to go to a Priest for confession. I believe (I Timothy 2:5) I can go to God through Jesus and confess my sins.

Really my friend? then why did Our lord Himself commission the apostles with the following in John 20?
21] Jesus said to them again, "Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you."
22] And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, "Receive the Holy Spirit.
23] If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained."

[LIST]
*]Catholic Confession
*]Scriptures About Penance
/LIST


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