Spanish Catholic Bible in Public Domain?


#1

Does anyone know if there’s a “classic” (i.e. with Deuterocanonical books) Catholic Bible in Spanish that’s in the public domain? I need one for a variety of uses (acting out parts, adding commentary, etc.) and I don’t want to have to worry about copyright issues.

I know most licenses for popular Bibles are pretty flexible, but if I can find one in the public domain it’s one less thing to worry about…


#2

On the Vatican website:

vatican.va/archive/ESL0506/_INDEX.HTM


#3

Hi, thanks for the answer!

Unfortunately the version you posted is copyrighted, and not in the public domain. I've looked a lot myself.

At this point I'm not even sure there's a version of the Catholic BIble in Spanish that's in the public domain... although I'd love to be proven wrong!


#4

Yes, there is: La Biblia de Petsco y Torres Amat. It is a multi-volume work written in the 19th century, and it appears in a Latin-Spanish parallel translation – sort of like interlinear, but instead it has two columns facing each other, one in Latin and one in Spanish. It is in the public domain, it contains all the books. Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3, Volume 5, and Volume 6 of the Old Testament are available online, and Volume 1 of the New Testament is available too. Other volumes might be found here.


#5

[quote="dmar198, post:4, topic:317820"]
Yes, there is: La Biblia de Petsco y Torres Amat. It is a multi-volume work written in the 19th century, and it appears in a Latin-Spanish parallel translation -- sort of like interlinear, but instead it has two columns facing each other, one in Latin and one in Spanish. It is in the public domain, it contains all the books. Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3, Volume 5, and Volume 6 of the Old Testament are available online, and Volume 1 of the New Testament is available too. Other volumes might be found here.

[/quote]

Actually nevermind that stuff, because I just found a complete HTML version at this site, and moreover, if you want an even older complete Catholic Spanish translation, I found one at this Google Books link.


#6

DMAR,

Much thanks for the posts! Very helpful.

A quick followup question: is there a (relatively) easy way to verify that that HTML version is in the public domain? Or that it's the precise version you say it is?

Sorry if that sounds I like don't trust you; I just need to be able to verify it myself in case legal issues were ever to come up (however remote that might be...)

Much thanks again.


#7

In order of accuracy and tradition: Nacar-Colunga. this bible is the equivalent of the Douay-Rheims.

The Jerusalem Bible. And finally the Latinoamerica. this one is a little too loose of a translation for my taste but you may find it acceptable. All 3 have the Nihil obstat and Imprimatur.


#8

[quote="nyuman, post:6, topic:317820"]
DMAR,

Much thanks for the posts! Very helpful.

A quick followup question: is there a (relatively) easy way to verify that that HTML version is in the public domain? Or that it's the precise version you say it is?

Sorry if that sounds I like don't trust you; I just need to be able to verify it myself in case legal issues were ever to come up (however remote that might be...)

Much thanks again.

[/quote]

Well, I found it linked to in a Spanish wikipedia article that was listing different Spanish Bible translations. The listing for the Petisco-Amat version had a link to that website as the source, so that's how I found it. (It's footnote 18 in that article.) I suppose the best way to verify that it is an accurate translation would be to check it against the Google Books version I already linked you to. Pick a few random passages and verify that they are the same; and periodically while you are writing your commentary you can take a few passages you are commenting on and verify that they are the same in the HTML version and in the Google Books version. That should get you through.

You could also check the online book-introductions and make sure they're the same as the introductions in the printed version.


closed #9

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