Spanish Mass?


#1

Hello,
I am attending the vigil mass tomorrow for all saints day and it is in Spanish ,
I speak a little Spanish but Do not know the mass responses like I do in English,
I have printed out a paper with side by side translations and was planning on bringing that to the mass to help me to be able to respond in Spanish.
Is this a good idea?

Gracias Y que dios los bendiga,
Thanks and God Bless


#2

Sure.

If you look in the missalette, a lot of times you'll find a yellow section that is the Spanish portion. In which case, you won't need your cheat sheet.

One thing I've noticed around here: the Spanish Masses tend to sit/stand/kneel at different times than the English masses. Not all of them, but enough to notice a pattern. Someone told me that a lot of Mexico uses the Dominican Rite, which is similar, and which has different postures, and that has carried over. I have no idea if it's true or not; I just chalk it up to refusal to assimilate.


#3

Sure, I went to one for Mother's Day and I don't speak Spanish. I haven't been to church on Mother's Day since my Mom died. It's too painful. Now that I'm Catholic I had to go. I looked at it like going to a Latin Mass. I don't speak Latin either. I followed along with the readings on my phone, whispered the responses in English.


#4

How come Spanish masses are ok but Latin Masses cause such drama? :shrug:

My great-grandmother loved the Latin Mass because it was the same as it was back home in Poland. When they went to English she didn't understand it as well because her Missal was Latin/Polish.


#5

[quote="Seeker1961, post:4, topic:303587"]
How come Spanish masses are ok but Latin Masses cause such drama? :shrug:

My great-grandmother loved the Latin Mass because it was the same as it was back home in Poland. When they went to English she didn't understand it as well because her Missal was Latin/Polish.

[/quote]

Because typically there is a greater change than just the language in a "Latin Mass." And because Trads tend to be argumentative and contumacious.

When the priest delivers the homily in Latin and the congregation understands him, that will be a different story.


#6

[quote="Richard320, post:5, topic:303587"]
Because typically there is a greater change than just the language in a "Latin Mass." And because Trads tend to be argumentative and contumacious.

When the priest delivers the homily in Latin and the congregation understands him, that will be a different story.

[/quote]

I've been to Latin Masses many times and never heard a homily in Latin.


#7

[quote="Seeker1961, post:6, topic:303587"]
I've been to Latin Masses many times and never heard a homily in Latin.

[/quote]

My point exactly!!

What's the use of having the responses in Latin when the Homily is in English?


#8

[quote="Richard320, post:7, topic:303587"]
My point exactly!!

What's the use of having the responses in Latin when the Homily is in English?

[/quote]

Because even if all those attending cannot speak English, or whatever the language of the country they can still understand the liturgy. In the days before the vernacular, that's how it was and since every Mass was in Latin and we were taught it in school, we knew the meaning of the liturgy in that language. If it had stayed that way, we could have gone to any Catholic Church in the world and understood the liturgy. That doesn't work anymore. If I go to Mass in another language, I can't understand anything.


#9

Back in the thirties we had Polish Mass,German Mass, Italian Mass…all depending on your neighborhood.


#10

[quote="Seeker1961, post:4, topic:303587"]
How come Spanish masses are ok but Latin Masses cause such drama? :shrug:

My great-grandmother loved the Latin Mass because it was the same as it was back home in Poland. When they went to English she didn't understand it as well because her Missal was Latin/Polish.

[/quote]

What drama??


#11

[quote="IronMIke, post:9, topic:303587"]
Back in the thirties we had Polish Mass,German Mass, Italian Mass.....all depending on your neighborhood.

[/quote]

The homily was in those languages, not the liturgy prayers.


#12

misas.org/sta.tic/descarga/missa_es_en.pdf


#13

[quote="maltmom, post:10, topic:303587"]
What drama??

[/quote]

The drama that occurs almost invariably when Trads start derailing threads.

Watch for the http://forums.catholic.com/images/statusicon_khaki/thread_hot_lock.gif

:D


#14

[quote="Seeker1961, post:11, topic:303587"]
The homily was in those languages, not the liturgy prayers.

[/quote]

The entire Mass not just the homily.


#15

[quote="Richard320, post:13, topic:303587"]
The drama that occurs almost invariably when Trads start derailing threads.

Watch for the http://forums.catholic.com/images/statusicon_khaki/thread_hot_lock.gif

:D

[/quote]

Actually, in my limited experience it is insults that cause threads to be locked.

I would much rather attend a Latin Mass in Spain where I would understand nearly everything than a Spanish mass in FL where I would understand nothing. That's my point.


#16

[quote="Seeker1961, post:8, topic:303587"]
Because even if all those attending cannot speak English, or whatever the language of the country they can still understand the liturgy. In the days before the vernacular, that's how it was and since every Mass was in Latin and we were taught it in school, we knew the meaning of the liturgy in that language. If it had stayed that way, we could have gone to any Catholic Church in the world and understood the liturgy. That doesn't work anymore. If I go to Mass in another language, I can't understand anything.

[/quote]

Amen!!

It enforced the idea of being "Catholic" in every sense of the word.

I could go to a TLM in Africa and still understand. I could go to France, or spain, or portugal, or china and I would have understood. Except the Homily. THe Homily is Important to be sure, but what really counts is the CONSECRATION!!!


#17

I like going to the bi lingal mass on sunday at Saint Joseph, there are not very many of them here in houston. I get a little confuse at the all spanish mass, some of the words prononunce I had never heard. But when I go mass at the co cathedral and Cardinal DiNardo gives the mass it might be tri lingal( three) english, spanish and latin


#18

I think that is a very good idea. And I would say vice-versa for any one from the community of another language coming to Mass in English.
:):):)


#19

[quote="taylormcbee, post:1, topic:303587"]
Hello,
I am attending the vigil mass tomorrow for all saints day and it is in Spanish ,
I speak a little Spanish but Do not know the mass responses like I do in English,
I have printed out a paper with side by side translations and was planning on bringing that to the mass to help me to be able to respond in Spanish.
Is this a good idea?

Gracias Y que dios los bendiga,
Thanks and God Bless

[/quote]

Yes, a very good idea. I usually print off Latin-Spanish sheets and bring them with me.


#20

[quote="taylormcbee, post:1, topic:303587"]
Hello,
I am attending the vigil mass tomorrow for all saints day and it is in Spanish ,
I speak a little Spanish but Do not know the mass responses like I do in English,
I have printed out a paper with side by side translations and was planning on bringing that to the mass to help me to be able to respond in Spanish.
Is this a good idea?

Gracias Y que dios los bendiga,
Thanks and God Bless

[/quote]

I think it's a good idea. I do that when I've attended Latin masses. It makes it easier to follow along and understand.


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