Spanish Novus Ordo: better translation?

I am not fluent in Spanish, but when I have attended Novus Ordo Mass in Spanish, I have noticed that the translation from the Latin seems to be done better.

For example:

  1. At the Confiteor: “Por mi culpa, por mi culpa, por mi gran culpa”. At the English Novus Ordo, there is only one “My fault”.

  2. They seem to have the Spanish version of “And with your(or thy) spirit”. At the English Novus Ordo, they say “And also with you”.

Anybody care to enlighten me further on this?

Maybe there is no Spanish version of ICEL!:thumbsup:

[quote=GoLatin]I am not fluent in Spanish, but when I have attended Novus Ordo Mass in Spanish, I have noticed that the translation from the Latin seems to be done better.

For example:

  1. At the Confiteor: “Por mi culpa, por mi culpa, por mi gran culpa”. At the English Novus Ordo, there is only one “My fault”.

  2. They seem to have the Spanish version of “And with your(or thy) spirit”. At the English Novus Ordo, they say “And also with you”.

Anybody care to enlighten me further on this?

Maybe there is no Spanish version of ICEL!:thumbsup:
[/quote]

My Spanish speaking friends unanimously affirm your observation.

Does anybody else out there have any further insights on this?

Perhaps WHY the Spanish NO translation is better?

Thank you!

Actually, the real question is why the English translation is so poor? But we already know the answer to that one. :wink: At least there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

You are correct about the Spanish being more accurate. Another one is when we say in English, “Lord, I am not worthy to receive you, but only say the word and I shall be healed.” But the real phrase is “receive you into my home”. A very different connotation.

My understanding is that all these corrections will be made in the upcoming new translation of the Novus Ordo in English which is working its way through the system now.

It seems that the Spanish and French translations are much closer to the Latin. This is not entirely surprising as both those languages are nearly 100% derived from Latin. English is quite a mix and definitely a MUCH more difficult translation from Latin. That being said, the current translation is not good, but fortunately it is being remedied for the better.

It’s interesting to note that the translation of the Our Father in english is also very different from spanish. The words “lead us not into temptation” definitely seem a little odd…why would God lead us into temptation? In spanish it is: “no nos dejes caer en la tentación” which translates more or less literally as “do not leave us to fall into temptation.”

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