SPLIT: Are there differences between a "Requiem" Mass and a "Funeral" Mass?

That’s true in the EF. I’ve no clue (nor do I much care) if the same applies in the OF.

That’s true in the EF. I’ve no clue (nor do I much care) if the same applies in the OF.

Yes, I referred to the EF, because the term Requiem comes from the old rite. Requiem, meaning rest, is the first word of the introit for all Masses for the Dead. The term, though certainly not improper, is not frequently used in connection with the OF, partly because the vernacular is usually associated with it, partly because the introits (entrance antiphons) in the OF are rarely heard. When one hears or sees the word requiem, it conjures up images of Masses with black vestments and the Dies Irae.

There is, of course, still a section of Masses for the Dead in the new missal, but its liturgical features do not distinguish Masses for the Dead from Masses for the Living as they did in the old rite. In other words, certain prayers were modifed or omitted in Masses for the Dead, whereas in the new rite they are the same for either type of Mass.

Yet it can be the case that a novus ordo Mass for the Dead might be distinguished from other Masses in (mostly) the same way and still be perfectly within the rubrics.

Black vestments are still the norm for all Masses for the Dead in the novus ordo. The “alleluia” before the Gospel may be omitted.

The unfortunate fact that many places have fallen-away from the use of the antiphons doesn’t mean that they can’t be done anymore.

I’m not sure if the Dies Irae was always done in “daily” Requiem Masses? I have also heard (but never got around to verify) that in the typical Roman Missal, the end of the Agnus Dei still provides for “dona eis requiem” in Masses for the dead, but this has been omitted from the English printing. And again, while I can’t verify it at this moment, I do have a vague memory that the Mexican Sacramentary does have this at least in the Latin section. Anyone have copies of these texts handy?

What I’m trying to convey here is that it is certainly possible to have a novus ordo requiem Mass as a daily Mass and still make the point that this is indeed a “Mass for the dead” and not just a Mass for any intention.

Black vestments are still the norm for all Masses for the Dead in the novus ordo…

The rubrics state that white, violet or black may be used. So I am not sure that one can state that black vestments “are still the norm,” especially since the vast majority of parishes, at least in the US, use white.

The unfortunate fact that many places have fallen-away from the use of the antiphons doesn’t mean that they can’t be done anymore.

That is quite true, which is why I stated that they were “rarely heard.”

I’m not sure if the Dies Irae was always done in “daily” Requiem Masses?

Yes, it was part of the propers for a daily Requiem.

I have also heard (but never got around to verify) that in the typical Roman Missal, the end of the Agnus Dei still provides for “dona eis requiem” in Masses for the dead, but this has been omitted from the English printing. And again, while I can’t verify it at this moment, I do have a vague memory that the Mexican Sacramentary does have this at least in the Latin section. Anyone have copies of these texts handy?.

I do not have the 2002 typical edition, but the prior editions (1970, 1975) do not include this option. They also include a blessing of the faithful at the end of Mass, something not found in the old rite in Masses for the Dead.

The norm for Masses for the dead is still black. White is an exception permitted in the US by way of an approved adaptation. That might not be what a lot of people experience, but the universal norm remains black.

But was the Dies Irae actually required at Requiem Masses? I’m not trying to be difficult here, I realy don’t know. My 1947 Missal says in the General Rubrics part V #5 “Sequentia pro Defunctis…vel omitti ad libitum Celebrantis” I may very well be misreading that.

Now that you mention it, though, I am noticing many more differences in a Requiem Mass as opposed to an “other” Mass.

But I will say that if the novus ordo is done properly, and if certain legitimate options are exercised, the overall “feel” of the Mass for the Dead can be similar to the Requiem in the EF.

If I remember I’ll check the Sacramentary from Mexico tomorrow to see if the “dona eis requiem” is given as an option–remember, that’s just a vague memory so don’t hold me to it!

It was permitted for the celebrant to omit the Dies Irae at the second and third Masses of All Souls Day, and for other Low Requiem Masses.

aaa

This sums up the problems in this forum.

Lux

Requiem Masses are Masses for the dead. Not all Masses for the Dead are funerals. The Requiem Mass is said for All Souls Day. I remember in pre-VII days that Masses offered for the souls of the deceased were Requiem Masses, and that they couldn’t be offered on a day with a higher ranking memorial or feast of a saint. I don’t have time to look this up right now, so if I am wrong, will someone please correct me. Today we offer Masses for the souls of the dead using whatever the Mass of the day is. Therefore, all funeral Masses are Requiems (since the introit begins “Requiem aeternam dona eis” or “Eternal rest grant unto them,” and that is where the name comes from), but not all Requiem Masses are funerals.

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