Spouse of the Holy Spirit!


#1

HailMary posted that Mary was the spouse of the Holy Spirit, I remember reading either de montfort or Ligouri expressing this same belief…

Does the church hold this POV?

and why this line of thinking?

What are your opinions about it?


#2

Yes, she was. The Holy Spirit “overshadowed” her. “Therefore, the Holy Being to be born will be called the son of God”, as Luke tells us.

What ‘else’ would you call the Holy Spirit, who ‘generated’ Christ, if not Mary’s spouse? Christ has a father and a mother. The Holy Spirit, Jesus, and God/Father are all ‘one’. But our human minds can’t really ‘grasp’ that God can be ‘all at once’ Father, Spouse and Child. The Holy Spirit is the Father is the Son. God is the Father; the Spirit is the Father, the Son is the Father.

Father and mother are ‘bound’ because God Himself bound them. Mary is mother; God is Father. . .either Mary and/or God is an adulterer if one is not the spouse of the other.


#3

Symbolling speaking Mary is. Why? The Holy Spirit overshadow Mary and made her pregnant.


#4

Hi,

Im just curious where this teaching originated from or who preached it first–which Pope?

Thanks:thumbsup:


#5

Thinking that because the Holy Spirit overshadowed her she is now the spouse of the Holy Spirit and that is why Joseph was just her care taker and not her true husband and why he supposedly kept her a virgin because it would have been adultry if they would have had a marraige union? This seems like gross stretching of the scriptures. I must admit… To think that the Spirit of God could be married to anyone is nothing but false… For He has always been just as Jesus has always been and is indeed God. Trying to say that one part of the trinity is Married… Human fallacy… Trying to bring God down to mans standards instead of bringing men up to Gods standards and miracles…:frowning:


#6

St. Maximillian Kolbe is the first I am aware of! No popes!


#7

The problem is some Protestants try to stretch the analogy too far. Of course Mary wasn’t literally married to the Holy Spirit in the human sense of the phrase, that’s just one of the ways the Church (both Catholic and Orthodox) trys to express Mary’s role in our salvation.


#8

Gee, Martin, just imagine. Trying to say that one part of the Trinity has a human nature. Why, that goes against God’s eternal nature, now doesn’t it?


#9

The term “spouse of the Holy Spirit” was around long before Maximilian Kolbe. Don’t make me run for this. I’m thinking maybe Bonaventure but it could be REALLY old: ECFs most likely.

I see no problem in characterizing Mary as “spouse of the Holy Spirit.” All Christians are in a spousal relationship with the Holy Spirit on some level. Mary’s relationship entailed a material fruit: the Body of Christ – both in the infant Jesus and as the Mother of the Church via her maternity of our Lord.

In our Creed we say that Jesus was “conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary”. I believe that is how Christ is born in our hearts: Conceived by the Holy Spirit and born or the Virgin Mary. Because of the spousal relationship essential to the Incarnation, Mary and the Holy Spirit are always together (think: Pentecost). They never got divorced.

Clearly, with Orthodox theology understanding that Mary is a virgin before, during, and after the Nativity, we are not dealing with a coarse, merely biological phenomenon here. The Incarnation, including the Holy Nativity is a mystery of faith inseparable from the hypostatic union. This ain’t biology class.


#10

Pope Paul VI . . .In Marialis Cultus, No. 26, Paul VI says, “The **Fathers and writers of the Church **. . . [in] examining more deeply the mystery of the Incarnation, saw in the mysterious relationship between the Spirit and Mary an aspect redolent of marriage, poetically portrayed by Prudentius: ‘The unwed Virgin espoused by the Spirit.’”


#11

I cut and pasted this, not sure from where, my apologies… thought it would be good for the thread.
Mary: Spouse Of The Holy Spirit
Of the two ways of explaining Mary’s universal mediation of grace (Motherhood of Christ vs. mystical union with the Holy Spirit), the reflections of St. Maximillian Kolbe seem to be the more persuasive. If the distribution of the graces merited by Christ’s redemptive death are appropriated to the Third Person of the Blessed Trinity, then Mary’s role as Mediatrix of all grace is seen more clearly in relation to her union with the Holy Spirit (accomplished in and through her Immaculate Conception). Kolbe summed it up well when he said: "As Mother of Jesus our savior, Mary was the Co-redemptrix of the human race; as the spouse of the Holy Spirit, she shares in the distribution of all graces."24 Thus, we can see that Kolbe’s emphasis on Mary’s relationship with the Holy Spirit in explaining her universal mediation of Christ’s grace both complements and provides a fuller understanding for the approach taken by Church Tradition, as enunciated by de Montfort and others.


#12

So she is NOT the spouse of the HS?


#13

I forgot to add it’s this type of stuff that’ll get a protestant to wince!


#14

The spouse of the Holy Spirt is clear error.
As the Holy Spirit is God, that would set up a situation where Mary is both the wife, and Mother of God… Holy incest?


#15

Much too literalistic a thought. Catholic theology is “literal” but not literalistic. This is not biology-as-we-know-it. It is not even biology!


#16

Define married.


#17

According to your logic, Christ is a polygamist!

Eph 5:23-24 For the husband is head of his wife just as Christ is head of the church, he himself the savior of the body. As the church is subordinate to Christ, so wives should be subordinate to their husbands in everything.

Oh the humanity!!! :eek: :smiley:

God bless,
Ut


#18

Don’t forget daughter of the Father


#19

Define spouse of the Holy Spirit!
This belief is erroneous; it should be dismissed or properly defended!


#20

Mary HAS a role in our salvation???:confused:


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