St. Fransisco Franco?


#1

I wodner if the Holy See woudl ever consider canonizing Fransisco Franco?

Though he gets much flack, he did help keep Spain from being taken over by godless socialists. He defended the Cahtolic faith and allowed it to flourish in splendour from 1939-1975.

His rule also made possible the Opus Dei of St. JoseMaria Escriva.

I know there were some questionable human rights stuff, but it was a "different time" as they say. Any thoughts?


#2

No. The Communists in Spain were pretty evil and killed tons and tons, but St. Louis he wasn't.

"Not as high a body count as most of the other 20th century dictators" isn't a recommendation, when your competition is folks like Lenin, Stalin, Hitler, and Mao.


#3

two theards same poster, title, wording, and sub-forum. :D :p


#4

He was better than most politicians, but he wasn't quite St. Louis.


#5

[quote="HabemusFrancis, post:1, topic:324632"]
I wodner if the Holy See woudl ever consider canonizing Fransisco Franco?

Though he gets much flack, he did help keep Spain from being taken over by godless socialists. He defended the Cahtolic faith and allowed it to flourish in splendour from 1939-1975.

His rule also made possible the Opus Dei of St. JoseMaria Escriva.

I know there were some questionable human rights stuff, but it was a "different time" as they say. Any thoughts?

[/quote]

Are you out of your mind? Francisco Franco may have beaten the Communists, but that in and of itself does not warrenty sainthood.
In fact, Franco was far from being a saint! Yes he supported the Church, but during his mis-rule of Spain there was horrible poverty because of his policies, and people starved to death. Because of this, there was wide spread prostitution of both sexes as well as rampant abortion. Technically, both were against the law, but this was largely ignored by the people and was not enforced by the authorities, and crime was rampant throughout the country. The Guardia Civil "kept the lid on" Spanish society and there was a total absence of personal freedom. Many, many people simply disappeared-and not just those who fought on the Republican side!
Last of all, he supplied Hitler with an Army Division of troops, called the Blue Legion. These troops fought bravely but ineffectually on the Russian front. Very few of these men lived to return to Spain.
All in all, such people and/or leaders are not made Saints by the Catholic Church.


#6

[quote="George_Stegmeir, post:5, topic:324632"]
Are you out of your mind? Francisco Franco may have beaten the Communists, but that in and of itself does not warrenty sainthood.
In fact, Franco was far from being a saint! Yes he supported the Church, but during his mis-rule of Spain there was horrible poverty because of his policies, and people starved to death. Because of this, there was wide spread prostitution of both sexes as well as rampant abortion. Technically, both were against the law, but this was largely ignored by the people and was not enforced by the authorities, and crime was rampant throughout the country. The Guardia Civil "kept the lid on" Spanish society and there was a total absence of personal freedom. Many, many people simply disappeared-and not just those who fought on the Republican side!
Last of all, he supplied Hitler with an Army Division of troops, called the Blue Legion. These troops fought bravely but ineffectually on the Russian front. Very few of these men lived to return to Spain.
All in all, such people and/or leaders are not made Saints by the Catholic Church.

[/quote]

Please provide some examples of people who were disappeared by the government.


#7

[quote="HabemusFrancis, post:1, topic:324632"]
I wodner if the Holy See woudl ever consider canonizing Fransisco Franco?

Though he gets much flack, he did help keep Spain from being taken over by godless socialists. He defended the Cahtolic faith and allowed it to flourish in splendour from 1939-1975.

His rule also made possible the Opus Dei of St. JoseMaria Escriva.

I know there were some questionable human rights stuff, but it was a "different time" as they say. Any thoughts?

[/quote]

I've never come across even ardent supporters of Franco who suggested that he could be considered a saint.

The Spanish Civil War took place when the aggressive persecutions in Mexico were still fresh in mind, and many Catholics assumed that Franco was a sort of anti-Calles.
Georges Bernanos took a great deal of flak for writing Les Grands cimitières sous la lune to disabuse people of this notion.

I've come to think that Our Lady was not simply warning against communism when she warned that "the errors of Russia" would spread through the world if Russia weren't consecrated to her Immaculate Heart: the tsars had already instituted state terror in which the Russian revolutionaries were reared; and the fascisti were subject to the same errors -- to the dynamic of state terror leading to revolutionary terror -- as the Soviet Union was.


#8

You started this thread twice - it's a duplicate.


#9

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