St Ignatius of Antioch


#1

The epistles of St Ignatius of Antioch are some of the most compelling early writings of a church father in support of the Real Presence, the hierarchy of the Church, heretical divisions, etc. St Ignatius was a disciple of the apostle John. I would be very interested in hearing comments from any protestants regarding these epistles.


#2

[quote=Mickey]The epistles of St Ignatius of Antioch are some of the most compelling early writings of a church father in support of the Real Presence, the hierarchy of the Church, heretical divisions, etc. St Ignatius was a disciple of the apostle John. I would be very interested in hearing comments from any protestants regarding these epistles.
[/quote]

They are not in the canon of scripture, therefore they are not inspired and non-binding on the true Christian conscience. They may make for interesting reading, but so are Tim Lahayes books.


#3

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]They are not in the canon of scripture, therefore they are not inspired and non-binding on the true Christian conscience. They may make for interesting reading, but so are Tim Lahayes books.
[/quote]

But it would still be nice to hear what they would say about his writings.

Peace


#4

My father, a non-Catholic, will not read the Early Church Fathers, as he says they are irrelevant. I asked him if he wouldn’t be interested to see what early Christians believed, and he said no.

I am a convert to the Catholic Church, and find the Church Fathers to be fascinating. Of course their words are not scripture, but they show that people close to the source believed in the Real Presance, in the authority of the Church, etc.

Yours,
Jessica


#5

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]They are not in the canon of scripture, therefore they are not inspired and non-binding on the true Christian conscience. They may make for interesting reading, but so are Tim Lahayes books.
[/quote]

True, they are not inspired writings. But Tim Lahay was not trained in person by the Apostle St. John. Neither was Mr. Lahay a bishop of Antioch (where they were first called “Christians”) from ~70-110 AD, during apostolic times, and neither was Mr. Lahay martyred in Rome for his faithfullness to the Holy Catholic Church. If I had to compare non-inspired commentary on the inspired teachings of the apostles, I’d have to give St. Ignatius’ writings more authoritative force.


#6

[quote=itsjustdave1988]True, they are not inspired writings. But Tim Lahay was not trained in person by the Apostle St. John. Neither was Mr. Lahay a bishop of Antioch (where they were first called “Christians”) from ~70-110 AD, during apostolic times, and neither was Mr. Lahay martyred in Rome for his faithfullness to the Holy Catholic Church. If I had to compare non-inspired commentary on the inspired teachings of the apostles, I’d have to give St. Ignatius’ writings more authoritative force.
[/quote]

Me too. That was just my lame attempt at sounding like a Protestant.


#7

Hmmmmm…I see that there is a cumulative silence from those who usually refute Catholic teachings. Come on guys. What do you think? I want to know why you do not accept his writings. If it’s because of sola scriptura, then say so. The silence is quite revealing. smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/23/23_28_119.gif


#8

marineboy,

The Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith has stated with regard to head coverings:

***INTER INSIGNIORES
*Declaration on the Admission of Women to the Ministerial Priesthood (15 October 1976)**Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith

it must be noted that these ordinances, probably inspired by the customs of the period, concern scarcely more than disciplinary practices of minor importance, such as the obligation imposed upon women to wear a veil on the head (1 Cor 11:2-6); such requirements no longer have a normative value.

While it is not proscribed by the Church, it is no longer obligatory (ie. a norm of the Church).


#9

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]Me too. That was just my lame attempt at sounding like a Protestant.
[/quote]

Don’t quit your day job, Scott. I don’t think you have a future as a Protestant.

:wink:


#10

[quote=itsjustdave1988]marineboy,

The Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith has stated with regard to head coverings:

***INTER INSIGNIORES
***Declaration on the Admission of Women to the Ministerial Priesthood (15 October 1976)Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith
While it is not proscribed by the Church, it is no longer obligatory (ie. a norm of the Church).
[/quote]

Dave, methinks your clipboard has run amok. :confused:


#11

[quote=Mickey]The epistles of St Ignatius of Antioch are some of the most compelling early writings of a church father in support of the Real Presence, the hierarchy of the Church, heretical divisions, etc. St Ignatius was a disciple of the apostle John. I would be very interested in hearing comments from any protestants regarding these epistles.
[/quote]

I, as a Catholic have read some of Ignatius’s letters and I find them great. The way he always tells the people to do what the bishop says and to do nothing without the bishop are great proofs for the Church. He also tells them to avoid schismatics and he exorts them to unity.

He is also great for the Eucharist. Justin Martyr and Irenaeus are also very good.

I personally think he is the greatest church father because he trained directly under John the apostle.


#12

[quote=OhioBob]Dave, methinks your clipboard has run amok. :confused:
[/quote]

:smiley: It wasn’t my clipboard, but my fingers. That’s what I get for having two windows open. I intended to post this on the “Bob Sungenis …” thread regarding head coverings. http://forums.catholic.com/images/icons/icon11.gif Pay no attention to the crazy person rambling on about the wrong topic in the wrong thread. :smiley:


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