St Patrick's Day


#1

Ok, this is probably a stupid question, but one of my Protestant buddies asked me this one, and I am afraid that I do not know the answer. When and why did St. Patrick’s day become associated with going out to the pub and getting bombed?

Thanks.


#2

[quote=sadie2723]Ok, this is probably a stupid question, but one of my Protestant buddies asked me this one, and I am afraid that I do not know the answer. When and why did St. Patrick’s day become associated with going out to the pub and getting bombed?

Thanks.
[/quote]

tradition.


#3

[quote=sadie2723]Ok, this is probably a stupid question, but one of my Protestant buddies asked me this one, and I am afraid that I do not know the answer. When and why did St. Patrick’s day become associated with going out to the pub and getting bombed?

Thanks.
[/quote]

St. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland. I’m 100% Irish so that’s O.K. to say. Pub stands for Public House, it’s how the Irish meet and talk. Before t.v. everyone met at the Pub to listen to music and for entertainment after coming in from the fields. It just so happens that pubs serve beer. So in celebration of St. Patrick the Irish will do as they do in the old country so to speak.


#4

[quote=sadie2723]Ok, this is probably a stupid question, but one of my Protestant buddies asked me this one, and I am afraid that I do not know the answer. When and why did St. Patrick’s day become associated with going out to the pub and getting bombed?

Thanks.
[/quote]

I’ve been in Ireland on St. Patrick’s Day and it is still a rather subdued day compared to what we’ve done with it in America. In Dublin there was a small parade which was led by a man dressed as the bishop, St. Patrick. It was a day to go to Mass and then do what most Irish people enjoy doing which is gathering at the pub.

The descendants of Irish immigrants here in America (I’m one) have turned the day into a day of pride for our heritage. So, it gets a little rowdy now that it is more about Irish pride than about a feast day for a saint.


#5

[quote=Eden]I’ve been in Ireland on St. Patrick’s Day and it is still a rather subdued day compared to what we’ve done with it in America. In Dublin there was a small parade which was led by a man dressed as the bishop, St. Patrick. It was a day to go to Mass and then do what most Irish people enjoy doing which is gathering at the pub.

The descendants of Irish immigrants here in America (I’m one) have turned the day into a day of pride for our heritage. So, it gets a little rowdy now that it is more about Irish pride than about a feast day for a saint.
[/quote]

smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/8/8_9_24.gif


#6

[quote=Mickey]smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/8/8_9_24.gif
[/quote]

Thanks, Mickey! Top o’ the Mornin’ to you! :shamrock:


#7

[quote=Eden]I’ve been in Ireland on St. Patrick’s Day and it is still a rather subdued day compared to what we’ve done with it in America. In Dublin there was a small parade which was led by a man dressed as the bishop, St. Patrick. It was a day to go to Mass and then do what most Irish people enjoy doing which is gathering at the pub.

The descendants of Irish immigrants here in America (I’m one) have turned the day into a day of pride for our heritage. So, it gets a little rowdy now that it is more about Irish pride than about a feast day for a saint.
[/quote]

Wasn’t Saint Patrick a Protestant? His father was a clergyman.


#8

Alfie: The mandate for celibacy did not come about until around 1000 AD. St. Patrick lived in the 400s. The Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Rite Catholics do not have mandatory celibacy. It is a discipline of the Roman church. Was this something your found in a Chick tract?


#9

[quote=Alfie]Wasn’t Saint Patrick a Protestant? His father was a clergyman.
[/quote]

We had no protestants at the time of St Pat and St Pat was a Bishop of the Catholic Church.


#10

[quote=Alfie]Wasn’t Saint Patrick a Protestant? His father was a clergyman.
[/quote]

Sure, if you think Protestants are made bishop or sent on missions by the Pope:

www.newadvent.org/cathen/11554a.htm

“No sooner had St. Germain entered on his great mission at Auxerre than Patrick put himself under his guidance, and it was at that great bishop’s hands that Ireland’s future apostle was a few years later promoted to the priesthood. It is the tradition in the territory of the Morini that Patrick under St. Germain’s guidance for some years was engaged in missionary work among them. When Germain** commissioned by the Holy See** proceeded to Britain to combat the erroneous teachings of Pelagius, he chose Patrick to be one of his missionary companions and thus it was his privilege to be associated with the representative of Rome in the triumphs that ensued over heresy and Paganism, and in the many remarkable events of the expedition, such as the miraculous calming of the tempest at sea, the visit to the relics at St. Alban’s shrine, and the Alleluia victory.”

Pope St. Celestine I, who rendered immortal service to the Church by the overthrow of the Pelagian and Nestorian heresies, and by the imperishable wreath of honour decreed to the Blessed Virgin in the General Council of Ephesus, crowned his pontificate by an act of the most far-reaching consequences for the spread of Christianity and civilization, when he entrusted St. Patrick with the mission of gathering the Irish race into the one fold of Christ. Palladius (q.v.) had already received that commission, but terrified by the fierce opposition of a Wicklow chieftain had abandoned the sacred enterprise. It was St. Germain, Bishop of Auxerre, who commended Patrick to the pope.”

St. Patrick a Protestant? Absolutely impossible. (Not just because the pope entrusted him with converting the Irish but Protestantism was not to appear for another 1100 years or so. Patrick would have no idea what you are talking about.)


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