St.Patricks day


#1

Do protestants celebrate St.Patrick’s day? I have a friend who claims to be protestant but his family celebrates St.Patricks Day. And i mean really celebrates too. Like a huge party. He is Irish so i thought maybe that might be why. But i thought Protestants didn’t believe in Saints.


#2

Depends on the Protestants. Episcopalians, and some Lutherans, especially, have a long tradition of veneration of the saints.


#3

I suspect it is a cultural thing. If they truly celebrated Saint Patrick’s Day it would be because he brought the Catholic faith to Ireland.


#4

Catholic or not, St Patrick’s Day (March 17) is ALSO the official National Day for Ireland - their version of 4 July (Independence Day) for Americans or 14 July (Bastille Day) for the French.

If 4 July was ALSO the feast day of whichever Catholic saint is patron of the US, I’m sure non-Catholic Americans would still celebrate. They may not have a particularly Catholic theme to their celebrations though. And to be honest St Pats day is now much more about Irishness than Catholicism in any event. Including the drinking of much green beer and other distinctly secular celebrations that probably would have horrified good St Patrick.


#5

Depends on what you mean by celebrate.
Having a party doesnt mean they believe St. Patrick to be a saint. Some do, some dont and yet they celebrate it in whatever way they choose to.

I dont think most people who celebrate it frankly know or care why they do.

I got into a big scene at my parish that is largly Irish on St. Patricks day not that long ago. I had said that St. Patrick was born in Scotland and isnt it funny most people dont know that.

You should have seen the reaction!:eek:

I could not believe it!:eek:

The Priest had to step in to defend me for crying out loud! And he is Irish!

I dont like the day at my parish since that episode so I go elsewhere now.


#6

Hi,

In all my life as a protestant we never celebrated in the church as any special day. Icant speak for all but I can say episcopals,baptists and non-denoms dont celebrate it as a religious holiday.

My husband family are Irish/Catholic and they celebrate/or use as an excuse to drink alot.:frowning:

I have a statue of St. Patrick in my house:eek: shocking I know(especially because you guys know where I stand).

But, my husband name is Patrick and he was born the day after St. Patricks day and my in-laws being catholic, they gave us the statue. I figure it would be rude of me not to take it. It is sitting in my curio cabinet and missing one hand.:o I dropped it.


#7

Hi,
Was that parish mostly Irish people? Why did they get so mad? I knew that as well. I think my in-laws told me the story of St. Patrick. Irishmen are passionate:thumbsup: :smiley:


#8

Discussing Saint Patrick’s day in Advent ? http://bestsmileys.com/clueless/1.gif anyway since primary school, I was always told he was born in Wales, don’t know if that will please them either, but that’s what I remember since childhood.

The person who was to become St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, was born in Wales about AD 385. His given name was Maewyn, and he almost didn’t get the job of bishop of Ireland because he lacked the required scholarship.

Source

Some argue about the highlands and the sheep of Scotland, but there are sheep in Wales too, as Patrick looked after sheep.


#9

Eireen-

read it again. I said On St. Patricks day!

It did not happen during Advent!

And I have just as many catholic links that state he was born in Scotland.

Geez. Here we go again.

I better get my Irish priest over here to tell you HE even agrees it was Scotland.

Geez.

The point is all of the big mouths that attacked me said he was born in Ireland and I was a dum* *&^ for blaspheming a Saint.

You had better believe I will never forget that one. And it happened right in front of 2 priests after Mass in front of my child! :eek:


#10

Yes, its a Large Irish parish. And passionate is a very charitable way to put it frankly.

They are argumentative and —they are ----

put it to you this way, I stay In Spite of the “passionate” influences there but its hard.

I dont want to say more on it.


#11

I wonder if its a sign. I have a St. Patrick Rosary. It got stuck in the zipper of my carry on bag once and split apart all over the airport in peices. I had it fixed but its pretty beat up, but I still keep it to pray the Rosary on his day.


#12

Damascus;1725104] Eireen-

read it again. I said On St. Patricks day!

It did not happen during Advent!

And I have just as many catholic links that state he was born in Scotland.

Geez. Here we go again.

I better get my Irish priest over here to tell you HE even agrees it was Scotland.

Geez.

Yes here we go again. :smiley:

The point is all of the big mouths that attacked me said he was born in Ireland and I was a dum* *&^ for blaspheming a Saint.

You had better believe I will never forget that one. And it happened right in front of 2 priests after Mass in front of my child! :eek:

Definitely not the done thing to argue in front of a little one, they need to get their terms right, not sure saying where he was or wasn’t born, is blaspheming.

I don’t know why anyone would get worked up about where he was born.

All I’m saying is since childhood I was told he was born in Wales.

Check this site out, Monastic Ireland, if it is as it says, he was captured and brought to Mayo, that would tie in with Croagh Patrick, (County Mayo) a mountain I’ve climbed, and many do annually.

End of my input, you’ll be glad to know. :irish2:

So when are you going to hit them with “he was born in Wales” ? lol keep me posted.


#13

LOL!

I will try to “hit” them with it next st pats day. But really I try to go to another parish on that day. Its just nutty at ours on that day. A real free for all. Everyone dressed up in – lets just say its distracting, always loud and disruptive, I can hardly do it anymore. Then the insults to boot.

I’ll try it for you since you seem totally unlike the people in my parish.:thumbsup:


#14

I went to a concert to see a local folk singer a few years ago. The woman who opened up the concert was an Irish Catholic immigrant. St. Patrick’s Day had been about a week before, and it was her first time experiencing it in the USA. She was horrified. She said that in Ireland, St. Patrick’s Day is a religious holiday. The people in Ireland don’t dress up in funny hats and drink until they fall over on St. Patrick’s Day; and they never drink green beer. St. Patrick’s Day as a drinking holiday is an American thing :eek: , not an Irish thing.


#15

Well Mass comes first, but yes sadly many drink to excess, green beer ? your right I have never seen green beer in Ireland.

They call it drowning the Shamrock, (stupid title) we do have our parades, but it don’t seem to be carried to the extreme it is in the USA, New York is the largest parade on the planet.


#16

Oh it’s very much an Australian thing too, sadly.


#17

Yes I figured as much.:smiley:


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