St Peter and the keys of the kingdom of heaven


#1

“And I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.”

  • King James Bible

““Thee” is an English word, translated from Greek; the original Greek made a distinction. And Peter wasn’t an apostle, bishop, or pope at the time the statement was made - but one of 12 equals. He was speaking to all the Disciples, not just Peter. Peter of one of 12 equals. The 12 would eventually go out into the world, they were equals when they did this and discussed amongst themselves what should be; they didn’t hound Peter for guidance or leadership.” Former Catholic quote

How do I response the “Thee” translation?


#2

What distinction did the Greek supposedly make?


#3

I don’t know. That is what I want to find out.


#4

That verse is very straight forward.

καὶ δώσω σοι τὰς κλεῖς τῆς βασιλείας τῶν οὐρανῶν
and (I) will give you the keys the kingdom of heaven


#5

How do I respond? By asking, What distinction did the Greek supposedly make? Then saying the verse is very straight forward?


#6

Yeah I would ask them what they are talking about. In some cases translating the Greek can be tricky but grammatically this one is easy. A week one Greek student could do it easily.


#7

Thanks, I did that and this is how he responded, “All of the Disciples were gathered and had been asked. Several had answered, Simon among them. Jesus was still addressing all of them when He spoke Matthew 16:13-19.”

I don’t think that is much of a response. What do you think?


#8

Ask him to cite the Greek. I mean I’m Orthodox and I believe that Jesus gave the keys to all of the Apostles but in the verse in question He is clearly addressing St Peter. The word “σοι” is the dative case of “σύ” (σὺ εἶ Πέτρος or you are Peter). In plain English that means St Peter is the object of what’s being given.


#9

I would respond by expanding the discussion to include the entire passage and not just his cherry picked piece. Here is the statement in context also from the KJV.
16 And Simon Peter answered and said, Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God. 17 And Jesus answered and said unto him, Blessed art thou, Simon Barjona: for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but my Father which is in heaven. 18 And I say also unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. 19 And I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven. 20 Then charged he his disciples that they should tell no man that he was Jesus the Christ.
Note how Jesus singles Simon out and renames him (very significant) and goes on to say, “And I say also unto thee, That thou art Peter…”
So what is this guy saying - - that Jesus renamed all of the Apostles “Peter”??? :shrug:
Not likely…

Were all the Apostles there and involved in the conversation? Sure they were. But in this place Jesus is speaking directly to Peter.

Peace
James


#10

The word “thee” ( second person singular)
is used because the Greek word “σοί” was also second person singular.

Matthew 16:18-19
“And I say also unto
thee [Greek #4671, σοί, second person singular]
That
thou Greek # 4771, σύ, second person singular]
art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. 19And I will give unto
thee [Greek #4671, σοί, second person singular]
the keys of the kingdom of heaven”

**Entry for Strong’s #4671 - σοί - **the person pronoun of the second person singular ; dative case of (4771) - i.e. in English “you” singular

**Entry for Strong’s #4771 - σύ **- **** the person pronoun of the second person singular; nominative case - i.e. in English “you” singular

18καγὼ δέ σοι λέγω ὅτι σὺ εἰ̂ Πέτρος

19δώσω σοι τὰς κλει̂δας τη̂ς βασιλείας

19δώσω I give]
σοι[you – singular]
τὰς [the]
κλει̂δας [keys]
τη̂ς [the]
βασιλείας [kingdom]

More resources:
studylight.org/desk/interlinear.cgi?search_form_type=interlinear&q1=Matthew+16%3A18-19&ot=bhs&nt=wh&s=0&t3=str_kjv&ns=0

classic.studylight.org/lex/grk/view.cgi?number=4771
.


#11

As was stated above-Simon’s change of name is very significant. Change of name can mean a change of destiny, an inner transformation or position change. Abram became Abraham -“Father of Nations”. Jacob’s name is changed to Israel-his family to become a nation. But Jacob ia also changed and not the ‘usurper’ he used to be.
Simon is singled out as “Peter”-rock.Peter’s position will change ,especially after Pentecost. When a list of apostles is in the Gospels ,Peter is always mentioned first. And the “beloved disciple” let’s Peter enter the tomb first even though the “beloved disciple” arrived first.
These things are written not as mere chance. the Gospel writers knew exactly what they were saying when they wrote the scriptures .
Simon is kinda of a mook, hotheaded.not the sharpest tool in the tool in the chest… In Acts , after Pentecost you see Peter start to shine, he becomes well spoken,organized, and brave. Not like the Peter who a short time before denied Jesus. He is a changed man.

God chooses who he chooses, not because they are the best , brightest or most lovable among his creatures. . The Lord sees the heart and the potential in each human being.


#12

No, Jesus was speaking to Peter alone (even though the group was there) just as I am speaking to you alone even though several thousand…okay, hundred people are following this thread.

We know this to be true because Peter alone had correctly answered the question, “Who do you say that I am.” Peter alone is given a new name (his name had been Simon). Peter alone receives the keys.

Jesus is actually quoting from the book of Isaiah…here’s the whole explanation for your friend (stick with me):

  1. Is Jesus a king?
  2. Did He re-establish the office of the Royal Steward?

In ancient times, a king might choose a second in command (known as the royal steward or prime minister) who literally wore a large key as a symbol of his office and who spoke with the authority of the king. The prophet Isaiah confirms this:

Isaiah 22:20-22
"In that day I will summon my servant, Eliakim son of Hilkiah. I will clothe him with your robe and fasten your sash around him and hand your authority over to him. He will be a father to those who live in Jerusalem and to the house of Judah. I will place on his shoulder the key to the house of David; what he opens no one can shut, and what he shuts no one can open.”

In the passage above, God is speaking to Shebnah, an unfaithful steward serving King Hezekiah. God is telling Shebnah that he is about to be replaced by Eliakim, and this confirms the existence of the office, the key worn as a symbol of the office, and the continuation of the office in perpetuity – despite the change of office holder. In other words, the office of the royal steward continued even when the man who held the office died or was replaced by someone else. God Himself passes the key from one steward to the next.

In the New Testament, we learn that Jesus inherits the throne of his father, David.

Luke 1:31–33
And behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus. He will be great, and will be called Son of the Most High; and the Lord God will give to him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over the house of Jacob forever; and of his kingdom there will be no end.

We also read the following:

Matthew 16:13-19
When Jesus came to the region of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say the Son of Man is?” They replied, “Some say John the Baptist; others say Elijah; and still others, Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” “But what about you?” he asked. “Who do you say I am?” Simon Peter answered, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Jesus replied, "Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, for this was not revealed to you by man, but by my Father in heaven. And I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven; whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.

The passage quoted above from Matthew tells us that Jesus named Peter as His royal steward and gave him the “keys to the kingdom of heaven" as the symbol of his authority to speak in His name. Since Jesus is an eternal king, the office of royal steward in His kingdom will never end. Peter died as a martyr as Jesus foretold, but the successors of Peter have taken his place in the perpetual office that Jesus established in His royal court.

In addition to the reference to a key or keys, note the following parallels:

"What he opens no one can shut, and what he shuts no one can open.” (Is. 22:22)
"Whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.” (Mt. 16:19)

Jesus specifically referenced the passage from Isaiah when He appointed Peter, and Peter received authority from Jesus to speak universally in His name. To do so faithfully, Peter must not teach error; therefore, Peter (and his successors who hold the office of the Royal Steward - also known as the Bishop of Rome) are protected by God through the charism of infallibility.

Therefore, if Jesus, our eternal king, established Peter as His first Royal Steward in a perpetual office, then despite the existence of other, lesser stewards (who have their own legitimate areas of authority) don’t Peter’s successors, the Bishops of Rome, continue to serve in that office today?


#13

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