St Therese of the Child Jesus


#1

Just thought I’d start this thread to share any stories you might have about St Therese.

Here’s mine:
I knew she was a famous saint but didn’t really know much about her. Then earlier this year, I wandered into a local church in Dublin to see it was packed. I was kind of surprised, cos it was a weekday. Then I saw a casket just before the sanctuary, and I realised, as Mass started that it was the mortal remains of St Therese. I listened to the homily and learned more than I ever knew about her. On my way out, I asked one of the priests what her book was called and then I went and bought it - Story of a Soul.
And wow what a book. I’m rereading it now.
So that’s how St Therese came into my life, she’s probably my favourite saint of all now.
It was such an uncanny coincidence that I know it was meant to be.

So is there anything anyone would like to share about this amazing saint?


#2

Hi Matthew. What a wonderful story! Thank you so much, for sharing your own friendship with St. Therese.

My earliest memories of St. Therese… are of my mother, telling me that I was named after “The Little Flower”. For years I really didn’t know much about her. But since my conversion and return to the faith (about 4-5 years ago)… she has been very much a part of my life! I even keep a framed portrait of her, in my room.

The most amazing story I have, though… is how St. Therese “introduced me” to her sister… Celine (aka Sr. Genevieve of the Holy Face). Not long after I became caregiver to my elderly mother, who suffers from Alzheimer’s… I became “aware” of the fact that St. Therese’s sister… Celine… had cared for their father, Blessed Louis Martin (who also suffered from something, like Alzheimer’s).

It was almost as though Therese had “recommended” Celine to me, as an intercessor! :thumbsup: Because she had shared a similar life circumstance with me. I had the distinct impression that St. Therese had prompted me to ask her sister, Celine… for prayers.

Awesome family… the Martins!

Thank you for the opportunity to share. I never get tired of reading about or discussing St. Therese and her family. God bless you.


#3

What a wonderful sister in Christ she is! I pray that I might be a thousandth the soul she is.

Celine wrote a book about life with her, and I highly recommend it. It has many further anecdotes and sayings of the Little Flower.

There’s also a biography entitled something like “The Search for St. Therese”. Initially I suspected it of being a horrible revisionist thing, but it was a very fair and warmly done testament to her holiness.

I’ll try to remember to get the ISBN numbers for you, I don’t have them on hand because they were given to my parish library.


#4

What a wonderful sister in Christ she is! I pray that I might be a thousandth the soul she is.

Celine wrote a book about life with her, and I highly recommend it. It has many further anecdotes and sayings of the Little Flower.

There’s also a biography entitled something like “The Search for St. Therese”. Initially I suspected it of being a horrible revisionist thing, but it was a very fair and warmly done testament to her holiness.

I’ll try to remember to get the ISBN numbers for you, I don’t have them on hand because they were given to my parish library.


#5

I was fortunate to have been named for St. Therese. That was back in the days when it was expected that a child bear a name of a saint. During my Catholic school days we were encouraged to learn about “our saint” and attempt to walk in the path of that saint. Her “little way” is the path I have tried to follow throughout my life and I am hoping I do her proud. She has been my compass, my friend…

My favorite book is one I stumbled on to by accident and one I go to when I need guidance. It is, St. Benedict and St. Therese: The Little Rule & the Little Way by Dwight Longenecker.


#6

Oh my, how I love St. Therese.

I’m 16 years old, and she was the patron saint of our marching band. I was suffering from an injury, and was in a lot of pain. I prayed to her one night of a festival, and my pain was lifted up. Then I found a little flower on the ground when I left. That was my first experience with St. T. I kind of shoved her aside for a little while, but when I started Confirmation classes, I saw the movie Therese. I remember bawling my eyes out at the end. I just wanted to pray. Then I read her book, and fell even more in love with her. I try my best to follow her “Little Way” every day. I’m just a little sixteen year old girl. I can’t drive, so I’m limited on everything I can do. I try, like St. Therese to be “little”. I like to think of my faith as a little child doing chores to make their Father happy. It pleases God to see people do sacrifices and prayers. I wear sacrifice beads, to remind me to always do everything I can for the love of Jesus. I call her my “heavenly buddy” because I believe she’s always looking out for me. When I have problems, I pray “St Therese, can you help me out?” and she usually does. I think she gets a kick out of interceeding for people. I can’t wait to meet her in heaven.

-Jeanne


#7

Thank you for starting this thread and thanks to all who have posted their stories. Just the “rose” I needed today. I am smiling now. :smiley:

Here’s a rose for y’all:

~~~’~,~’~,~’/<@

– Cadian :knight1:


#8

Here’s another:

I work with 3-6 yr. old kids every Sunday as a Children’s Liturgy aide. The teacher asked the kids "What is something beautiful God gives to us?"
and this precious little 3 year old goes “ROSES!!”


#9

"The Search for St. Therese"
Peter-Thomas Rohrbach, O.C.D.
1961
Library of Congress Card #61-12574


#10

I learned about the Little Flower after reading her book. The title struck me as humble and simple, so I was drawn in to read it. She is a very humble and simple saint. I like that.


#11

srhelena6.blogspot.com/


#12

I remember when we were little, we have a St. Therese stampita. Whenever we’re scared r afraid, we hold to it tightly (and unfortunately, it’s crumpled…)

I learned more about her when I read her autobiography last 2008. I am reading it over and over and over again. It changed my life, I was led out of my sinfulness through her book. I wished I could imitate her in virtues. I learned more about simplicity of life, and very extraordinary charity show in ordinary things.

In the early 2009, her relics came to our country. When we were waiting for the relics to come at our parish church, a Carmelite priest was giving a talk. That priest became a best friend and spiritual director! Then her relics came, I pressed (not that hard) my rosary (given by a nun, blessed by PopeJPII) and lots of other rosaries and a copy of her autobiography on the glass casing.


#13

In The Priority of Christ Fr. Robert Barron gives us vignettes of various Saints and the theological virtues, showing us how the infusion of divine grace while exercising these virtues leads to a supernaturally elevated life.

To be perfectly honest, I never liked Thèrése Of Lisieux and always found her life story situated somewhere between gruesome and cloyingly sentimental.

Fr. Barron takes Thèrése’s sappy tale and transforms it into something I can relate to, a story that illustrates divine grace in action. So I finally “get” it and I’m ashamed to finally admit that.

As penance I’ve prepared reading selections and hope you enjoy them. You can find it here:

payingattentiontothesky.com/2009/11/06/therese-of-lisieux-an-example-of-elevated-prudence/

dj


#14

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