Statement of Cardinal Blase J. Cupich, Archbishop of Chicago, on the Executive Order on Refugees and Migrants

Statement of Cardinal Blase J. Cupich, Archbishop of Chicago, on the Executive Order on Refugees and Migrants

This weekend proved to be a dark moment in U.S. history. The executive order to turn away refugees and to close our nation to those, particularly Muslims, fleeing violence, oppression and persecution is contrary to both Catholic and American values. Have we not repeated the disastrous decisions of those in the past who turned away other people fleeing violence, leaving certain ethnicities and religions marginalized and excluded? We Catholics know that history well, for, like others, we have been on the other side of such decisions.

These actions impose a sweeping and immediate halt on migrants and refugees from several countries, people who are suffering, fleeing for their lives. Their design and implementation have been rushed, chaotic, cruel and oblivious to the realities that will produce enduring security for the United States. They have left people holding valid visas and other proper documents detained in our airports, sent back to the places some were fleeing or not allowed to board planes headed here. Only at the eleventh hour did a federal judge intervene to suspend this unjust action.

We are told this is not the “Muslim ban” that had been proposed during the presidential campaign, but these actions focus on Muslim-majority countries. They make an exception for Christians and non-Muslim minorities, but not for Muslims refugees fleeing for their lives. Ironically, this ban does not include the home country of 15 of the 19 September 11 hijackers. Yet, people from Iraq, even those who assisted our military in a destructive war, are excluded.

The United States has a long history of welcoming refugees who are fleeing for their lives and Catholic organizations have helped to resettle many families, men, women, and children, from around the globe. Many of our priests, religious and laypeople have accompanied newcomers precisely to assist them in this process. Because of our history of aiding in refugee and migrant settlement for decades, we know the very lengthy and thorough vetting process they must face before they are admitted to our country. We have seen initial fear turn into a generous willingness of local communities to accept and integrate refugees. Here in Chicago generations of migrants have found a new home. We are better for it.

The world is watching as we abandon our commitments to American values. These actions give aid and comfort to those who would destroy our way of life. They lower our estimation in the eyes of the many peoples who want to know America as a defender of human rights and religious liberty, not a nation that targets religious populations and then shuts its doors on them.

It is time to put aside fear and join together to recover who we are and what we represent to a world badly in need of hope and solidarity. “If we want security, let us give security; if we want life, let us give life; if we want opportunities, let us provide opportunities.” Pope Francis issued these challenging words to Congress in 2015, and followed with a warning that should haunt us as we come to terms with the events of the weekend: “The yardstick we use for others will be the yardstick which time will use for us.”

I reject the premise of this statement 110%.

Cardinal Blase J. Cupich, is highly regarded by Pope Francis,and was recently just appointed Cardinal by Pope Francis too, but he is also considered to be a very “liberal” cardinal and some of his past statements have raised eyebrows among the many Catholics. :shrug:

There have also been a number of Catholic bishops who have spoken out against indiscriminate resettlement. A least one Italian bishop, and several in former Eastern Bloc countries. The legacy media chooses not to mention it.

Baka! Baka! Baka! :smiley:

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

This statement is factually incorrect

[quote]This weekend proved to be a dark moment in U.S. history. The executive order to turn away refugees and to close our nation to those, particularly Muslims, fleeing violence, oppression and persecution is contrary to both Catholic and American values. Have we not repeated the disastrous decisions of those in the past who turned away other people fleeing violence, leaving certain ethnicities and religions marginalized and excluded? We Catholics know that history well, for, like others, we have been on the other side of such decisions.

[/quote]

The number of refugee visas available is not substantially altered from the previous administration at 50,000.

What is changed is that Syrian refugees will not make up much of that list. But it does not follow from that ban that ournation is closed to refugees.

Part of my disagreement with this whole thing (in general, not the Archbishop’s statement in particular) is that the media is acting like Syria is the only country that is producing refugees. Having done a lot of mission work in Africa, my ‘silver lining’ is that this might will open more opportunities for African refugees.

The Syrian conflict has gotten a lot of news, as have the refugees. The EU for example, has assigned ‘quotas’ for Syrian refugee adoption to each of it’s member states. But only France has a program for refugees from the ongoing civil war in the DR Congo.

Trump has put in a limit of 50,000 refugees into the US, which seems about the same has was done in 2016. So the US is still accepting refugees, and in about the same numbers as under Obama.

So my hope is that refugees from other conflicts, such as in the DR Congo, or those Nigerians fleeing from the Boko Haram, have an opportunity to leverage more of those visas and resettle in the US. Those people have had nowhere near the media attention that the Syrian conflict has had, and their situation is no less dire. Perhaps more so, as the Syrians still have the EU programs to rely on.

And as a Catholic, I believe these are no less entitled to our support than the Syrians, again probably more so, as they have fewer options for help.

:thumbsup:

It is factual correct because Cardinal Chaput did not say we were closed to all refugees. As I have said before, grammar matters. The point is, we are closed to Arab Muslim refugees, as Trump said we would. I understand the fear that has gripped the hearts of many Americans since 2001. Playing this fear has help politicians since then. Yet it has no more place in Christianity that the Nineteenth Century fear that slaves will rape and kill white people if you let them, or that the Japanese-Americans will spy on us if we do not inter them. I do not doubt history will judge us in the same light.

Cardinal Chaput is giving us the Christian perspective that all Catholic leaders who have spoken on the subject have been giving us over the last two decades. Is there room for disagreement? Sure, but understand those you stand with. If there is a subject in which no Catholic leader, even the most conservative, are speaking up in an agreement, and you have to stand with those who think this is a matter of prudence, then maybe it is fear, not prudence.

The charity God demands of us is not without risk. Walking the safe road may be broad and easy, especially in the post-Trump election climate, but God calls us to that narrow road, not because it is easy, but because it is right.

Look at everyone tripping over themselves to correct the bishop. Disagree with or bishops and the pope at your own peril.

:thumbsup:

I reject this Cardinal’s fallacios assessment of the temporary ban also. Our government is failing us in so many areas. President Trump is like a doctor delivering bad news to a patient who has been neglecting their health for many years and is going to have to swallow some bitter pills and even surgery in order to survive. Pray for our President.

[quote] The executive order to turn away refugees and to close our nation to those, particularly Muslims, fleeing violence, oppression and persecution

[/quote]

.

No, that is not factually correct. It calls out Muslims in particular, but on in reference*as an example of those fleeing violence, oppression et…

Our nation is not closed to those who are fleeing oppression. It is accepting approximately the same number of refugees as it has it the past.

One thing I am lookingforward to is an increase in the acceptance ofrefugees from areas that are forgotten in the media. And that would fulfil the Cardinal request to not marginalize those of other raceswho have been marginalized and excluded. The DR Congo certainly qualifies!!

As I have said before, grammar matters. The point is, we are closed to Arab Muslim refugees, as Trump said we would.

It is not, it is closed only torefugees from a particular nation. Arabsof most other nations*remain free to enter.

Cardinal Chaput…
.

As an additional FYI, it is +Cupich that*issued this statement, not Archbishop Chaput. I bring that up only in that you mentioned it twice, so I wanted to clear up any ambiguity.

We are allowed to point out factual errors, are we not?

There is no peril in that at all, as the Church holds fast to truth in all its forms.

Unfortunately I can certainly imagine some people using the Japanese American internment example to justify similar measures against Muslims. After all, they can say, truthfully, that “Democrats did it too” as FDR was a Dem.

I also noted the Cardinal mentioned (as I have on another topic) that Catholics themselves have been “on the other side of such decisions”. I find it very ironic that so many Catholics support Trump unquestioningly on this issue. It wasn’t that long ago that the loyalty of Catholics to the US was seen as suspect, and as fairly recently as JFK it was conventional wisdom that “America will never elect a Catholic for president” and JFK essentially had to publicly proclaim that he didn’t take orders from the Vatican.

And this was a decade before Roe v Wade. I think many Catholics assume the “Kennedy model” of artificially separating one’s personal beliefs from public policy decisions, was merely a way for Catholic politicians to justify being “pro-choice”, but it was also seen as a way to neutralize anti-Catholic prejudice.

Cardinal Chaput is giving us the Christian perspective that all Catholic leaders who have spoken on the subject have been giving us over the last two decades. Is there room for disagreement? Sure, but understand those you stand with. If there is a subject in which no Catholic leader, even the most conservative, are speaking up in an agreement, and you have to stand with those who think this is a matter of prudence, then maybe it is fear, not prudence.

I wonder if most Catholics realize that the Samaritans and Jews were enemies at the time of Jesus. According to the “America First” reasoning used here to defend Trump, the Good Samaritan was, at best, being imprudent by helping a Jew who was the enemy. At worst, a traitor to his people who collaborated with the enemy. Certainly not a hero Jesus meant for us to emulate.

I agree. And calling a cardinal an idiot or fool - even in Japanese slang, as done above - is worse and has been reported.

The Grindr gang is out in full strength today! :smiley:

Seriously, take your PC protests elsewhere. The Bible is not shy about calling us fools when we deserve it. Or is this where I get accused of micro-aggression and privilege? :slight_smile:

Its vetting of refugees has not failed us.
I pray for Trump’s metanoia,

Lol you need a safe space? You support this, you own the criticism.

Well, this whole episode at least proves that it’s not only the leftist liberals among us who think the Cafeteria Model of Catholicism is a valid one.

After all, I can’t think of any pro-Trump immigration policy post, that has actually referred to the Catechism, or Catholic tenets at all, to defend it.

But I say unto you, that whosoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment; and whosoever shall say to his brother, ‘Raca,’ shall be in danger of the council; but whosoever shall say, ‘Thou fool,’ shall be in danger of hell fire.

Take it up with Him.

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