Statement of Faith at work


#1

I’ve been offered a job at an evangelical protestant organization (doing computer work). Part of the application package has a “Statement of Faith”. Can a Catholic agree to this statement? Should I talk to my pastor about it before signing anything?

Thanks :confused:

Statement of Faith
We believe in one God, Creator and Lord of the Universe; the co-eternal Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
We believe that Jesus Christ, God’s Son, was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, lived a sinless life, died a substitutionary atoning death on the cross, rose bodily from the dead, and ascended to heaven where, as truly God and truly man, He is the only mediator between God and man.

We believe that the Bible is God’s authoritative and inspired Word. It is without error in all its teachings, including creation, history, its own origins, and salvation. Christians must submit to its divine authority both individually and corporately, in all matters of belief and conduct, which is demonstrated by true righteous living.

We believe that all people are lost sinners and cannot see the Kingdom of God except through the new birth. Justification is by grace through faith in Christ alone. We believe in one holy, universal, and apostolic Church. Its calling is to worship God and witness concerning its Head, Jesus Christ, preaching the Gospel among all nations and demonstrating its commitment by compassionate service to the needs of human beings and promoting righteousness and justice.

We believe in the necessity of the work of the Holy Spirit for the individual’s new birth and growth to maturity and for the Church’s constant renewal in truth, wisdom, faith, holiness, love, power, and mission.

We believe that Jesus Christ will personally and visibly return in glory to raise the dead and bring salvation and judgment to completion. God will fully manifest His Kingdom when He establishes a new heaven and new earth, in which He will be glorified forever and exclude all evil, suffering, and death.


#2

That statement pretty much follows our creeds. If the “alone” wasn’t in there, it would appear to be okay. Check with your priest just to be sure.


#3

[quote=FraterChristi]I’ve been offered a job at an evangelical protestant organization (doing computer work). Part of the application package has a “Statement of Faith”. Can a Catholic agree to this statement? Should I talk to my pastor about it before signing anything?

Thanks :confused:

Statement of Faith
We believe in one God, Creator and Lord of the Universe; the co-eternal Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
We believe that Jesus Christ, God’s Son, was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, lived a sinless life, died a substitutionary atoning death on the cross, rose bodily from the dead, and ascended to heaven where, as truly God and truly man, He is the only mediator between God and man.

**We believe that the Bible is ** God’s authoritative and inspired Word. It is without error in all its teachings, including creation, history, its own origins, and salvation. Christians must submit to its divine authority both individually and corporately, in all matters of belief and conduct, which is demonstrated by true righteous living.

We believe that all people are lost sinners and cannot see the Kingdom of God except through the new birth. Justification is by grace through faith in Christ alone. We believe in one holy, universal, and apostolic Church. Its calling is to worship God and witness concerning its Head, Jesus Christ, preaching the Gospel among all nations and demonstrating its commitment by compassionate service to the needs of human beings and promoting righteousness and justice.

We believe in the necessity of the work of the Holy Spirit for the individual’s new birth and growth to maturity and for the Church’s constant renewal in truth, wisdom, faith, holiness, love, power, and mission.

We believe that Jesus Christ will personally and visibly return in glory to raise the dead and bring salvation and judgment to completion. God will fully manifest His Kingdom when He establishes a new heaven and new earth, in which He will be glorified forever and exclude all evil, suffering, and death.
[/quote]

I think the bolded parts in the Statement of Faith are contrary to our Catholic faith. You should talk to a priest. You might submit this as a question on the “Ask an Apologist” forum here.


#4

[quote=FraterChristi]Can a Catholic agree to this statement? Should I talk to my pastor about it before signing anything?
[/quote]

What is the purpose of signing it? Do you have to be an evangelical to work for them? Do they know you are catholic?

I think you could sign it in good faith. I also think that portions of the statement may mean different things to the evangelicals than to you. So while you could sign it in a catholic sense, they would view it as being signed in an evangelical sense.

Another question to consider would be do you want to work with an organization who’s view of faith is that different from yours?

If you went to work for them are you sure they don’t view the catholic church as the “Whore of Babylon”?


#5

[quote=ReginaNova]I think the bolded parts in the Statement of Faith are contrary to our Catholic faith. You should talk to a priest. You might submit this as a question on the “Ask an Apologist” forum here.
[/quote]

The bolded parts are most certainly not against the Catholic faith, especially the part about Jesus being the only mediator. The Catholic faith teaches that Christ is the only mediator. Period. Does that mean that non-Christians are going to hell? Not necessarily; it just means that those who end up in heaven won’t realize who was mediating them all along until they meet him after death.

Concerning the Bible, the Church does not positively place limits on its inerrancy, although she has not specifically delineated the nature of this inerrancy. If a Catholic believes that the Bible is literally historically accurate in all matters, nobody could tell them they were violating Church teaching, just as a Catholic who believed some parts to combine history and symbol could not be reprimanded either. The Church permits a diversity of view on this matter.

As for justification, we do believe that it is by faith alone, but we believe that it is not completed without works. Works without faith are dead works, hence faith must come first. But a faith that does not produce the “works of faith” soon becomes a dead faith.

Consult the Catechism on these matters–it will be able to explain them far better than I.


#6

[quote=GeorgeSutton]As for justification, we do believe that it is by faith alone, but we believe that it is not completed without works. Works without faith are dead works, hence faith must come first. But a faith that does not produce the “works of faith” soon becomes a dead faith.
[/quote]

Unfortunately accepting this word may cause confusion over the OP’s beliefs. Was “alone” not a word that Luther added to the Bible erroneously (the whole “…tell them doctor Luther said so” thing)? If one allows the word to be used, an explanation of its meaning may be needed so as not to cause confusion or scandal (the OP is a Catholic signing an Evangellical Protestant statement of beliefs).

Perhaps the OP would consider substituting his companies statement of beliefs with a Catholic creed. It would be appropriate to ask for this, since the Faith he ascribes to is not the same as those for which he plans on working.

Just a thought.

God bless,

Agricola


#7

a nearly identical statement of faith is required of volunteers to a very worthy pro-life ministry here run by evangelicals and when we enquired with the diocese we were told that it denies essential Catholic doctrines and may not be signed.


#8

[quote=puzzleannie]a nearly identical statement of faith is required of volunteers to a very worthy pro-life ministry here run by evangelicals and when we enquired with the diocese we were told that it denies essential Catholic doctrines and may not be signed.
[/quote]

It’s too bad when that happens. There are Catholic and non-denominational pro-life organizations in many cities. If there is no such presence in your area, you could ask your bishop to start one. Our bishop actively participates in pro-life rallies and fundraisers in our diocese. There are many varying groups in our area, but they all work together to a certain extent. Perhaps you could start a Catholic branch for the organization you spoke of.

God bless,

Agricola


#9

I am involved in an active and vibrant Catholic pro-life ministry in the Valley, and the bishop is looking into a Catholic form of the particulary ministry of which I speak, but for a number of reasons it will be some time before we have the resources in terms of professionals and facilities to do this highly specialized ministry. meanwhile we are allowed to support it in various ways, but not to sign that declaration.


#10

[quote=puzzleannie]I am involved in an active and vibrant Catholic pro-life ministry …
[/quote]

puzzleannie–Does the Catholic pro-life ministry make volunteers sign a Catholic Statement of Faith? I have never heard of a Catholic organization making volunteers sign a Statement of Faith. But it is very common for evangelical Protestant volunteer organizations to ask volunteers to sign a Statement of Faith which usually have beliefs that a Catholic really shouldn’t sign.

George Sutton–I believe the phrase “there is no mediator but Jesus Christ” means that one doesn’t believe in the “intercession of saints”–which we Catholics believe in but Protestants don’t.


#11

[quote=ReginaNova]puzzleannie–Does the Catholic pro-life ministry make volunteers sign a Catholic Statement of Faith? I .
[/quote]

No, it does not, but by its very nature it attracts more orthodox, faithful Catholics. What is very sad is the rift between Catholics involved specifically in pro-life ministries, and those engaged in other social justice, who should have a common cause, but so often are at odds with each other.


#12

[quote=ReginaNova]George Sutton–I believe the phrase “there is no mediator but Jesus Christ” means that one doesn’t believe in the “intercession of saints”–which we Catholics believe in but Protestants don’t.
[/quote]

What most Protestants are also hitting (and hinting) at here with this quote “there is no mediator but Jesus Christ” is also the Sacrament of Reconciliation. They don’t like what Confession is all about.

To the original OP… If I was in your shoes, I’d be very blunt with the person that asked me to sign the Statement of Faith. I’d take the Statement and go line by line and ask “what do you mean?” I’d show them my interest in working with them but not if they are going to subvertly try to convert me and then it turn into a hostile (covertly or overtly) work environment.

And pray about it. :slight_smile: Good luck!!!
theresa


#13

Will they let you sign-off on the acceptance of the Nicene Creed instead?


#14

Have they already offered you the job? If they have, you can not sign that and it would be illegal for them to deny you the job. Currently the laws do not allow them to discriminate on the basis of religion IF the job in question is not directly related to matters of faith. I would talk to your priest and a diocesan lawyer.


#15

We were asked to sign a very similar Statement of Faith in order to join a homeschooling support group at my parents’ evangelical church, and they had an added spot for saying something to the effect of “Even though I don’t believe this myself, I will support the teaching of it to my children.” I didn’t sign it or join the group, but maybe the church you are wanting to work for has a similar option. You don’t have to believe it yourself, but you will not actively oppose it either. It seems like you could easily do that just to work on the church’s computers.

I’m not sure how badly you need the job, but I probably wouldn’t sign anything, just as a matter of principle.

Good luck.


#16

One of my friends had to sign something similar to this to work in a pro-life organization. He crossed out the non-Catholic parts, signed it, and there were never any problems.


#17

I would take it to your priest, have him look at it and follow his guidance.


#18

I just thought of something - why not bring them in a copy of the Nicene Creed and the Apostles Creed and offer to sign THAT and have it put in your employment file?


#19

[quote=ReginaNova]George Sutton–I believe the phrase “there is no mediator but Jesus Christ” means that one doesn’t believe in the “intercession of saints”–which we Catholics believe in but Protestants don’t.
[/quote]

On the other hand, in saying that there is no mediator but Jesus Crist, the statement of faith is adapting the Scriptures:

"For there is one God, and there is one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus, " (1 Titus 2:5)

The saints are not mediators of our salvation in the way that christ is; they are mediators in the sense of communication and also of grace but only insofar as they partake of the grace of Christ and transmit it to us inasmuch as any of the “least of our brethren” do, although the saints do so preeminently in that they are members of the Church triumphant and are in the state of glorification.

My thought was that the statement of faith could be signed with OP giving a Catholic interpretation to that to which he was putting his name. On the other hand, as so many have pointed out, if this is being taken as a public profession of faith, and will be interpreted by protestants in a protestant way, then it is best not to sign.


#20

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