STDs in US reach record high


#1

#2

Not surprised. I’ve got many friends that engage in practices that can result in the transmission of the diseases that appeared to be unaware of their risks until I told them.


#3

It’s just another example of a moral decline in our society …all the talk about safe sex…about the protections in place…yet the numbers continue to rise…my wife said she had treated patients who had been treated 2-3 times previous for STD’s…it makes you wonder if one or more of these STD’s will mutate into something much more virulent and immune to current treatments


#4

And the extreme right will make the proclamation that it is wrath of god, as it was with HIV.


#5

No need to wonder. It’s already happened.

https://www.cdc.gov/std/gonorrhea/arg/default.htm


#6

This is anecdotal, but for the cases that I know the people are not talking about or engaging in practices that fall under the label of “safe sex.” Quite the opposite; they’ve expressed a better experience in the absence of it. There were some that thought they could not get STDs from oral activity (I don’t know why the existence of herpes alone didn’t clue them to that not being the case).

There are STDs and other non-STD bacterial infections that have become more resistant to antibiotics. There’s a general concern that in the long run we might run out of effective antibiotics to treat bacterial infections.


#7

Then unfortunately, we let God’s Natural Law run it’s course.


#8

You just can’t help yourself,can you?:flushed:


#9

I blame Tinder and Plenty of Fish.


#10

NO… but it is society ignoring Gods commandments and the Churches advice. Contraceptives are not helping to keep anyone safe.


#11

Just keeping it real.


#12

Read the whole article …

In 2013, there were 1,752,285 total cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis diagnosed in the United States. That number grew to 1,811,850 in 2014; [1,945,746 in 2015]

“We’re talking about millions of infections with just these three infections,”

“Gonorrhea diagnoses that were reported to the CDC increased by nearly 67%. Diagnoses of primary and secondary syphilis increased over 75%, and chlamydia rates continued to increase,” he said. “It’s important to remember that while these are preliminary data, and the data are eight months out of date. There’s absolutely no reason to think that the increases that are being described by the CDC haven’t continued into 2018.”

The preliminary data suggest that more than 1.7 million cases of chlamydia were diagnosed in 2017, with about 45% – 771,340 cases – emerging among 15- to 24-year-old women and girls.

Meanwhile, syphilis diagnoses jumped from 27,814 cases in 2016 to 30,644 in 2017, according to the preliminary data. Men who engage in sexual activity with men made up 17,736 of those syphilis cases in 2017, the data suggest.

[![Record STD rates drive syphilis in newborns]

“We know today that some of what is driving congenital syphilis are women who are trading sex for drugs and that that explains some of the infections we are seeing in babies of syphilis,” Harvey said Tuesday.

Gonorrhea diagnoses increased from 468,514 in 2016 to 555,608 cases in 2017, according to the data. Among men only, cases climbed from 270,033 in 2016 to 322,169 in 2017, the data suggest.

Gonorrhea is typically treated with a dual therapy of the antibiotics ceftriaxone and azithromycin.

Yet the threat of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea persists nationwide.

‘We are sliding backward’

"Over the years, gonorrhea has become resistant to nearly every class of antibiotic we’ve used to treat it,

[![First case of super-resistant gonorrhea reported]

Overall, “it’s important to realize that the gonococcus, the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, has reliably developed resistance to every antibiotic that has ever been used to treat the infection. But in the past 15 to 20 years, the number of new antibiotics available and the development of new antibiotics has slowed greatly,” Hook said.

“So we have this continued inexorable process of the gonococcus developing antimicrobial resistance, coupled with fewer new antibiotics to pick up and take care of the problem if it develops,” he said. “That’s a very troublesome combination.”

CDC’s preliminary data show that emerging resistance to azithromycin is on the rise in laboratory testing. In 2013, 1% of gonorrhea samples showed emerging resistance to the drug, but that number had risen to more than 4% in 2017, according to the CDC.

All in all, “we are sliding backward,”

“It is evident the systems that identify, treat, and ultimately prevent STDs are strained to near-breaking point,” he said.


#13

Makes you look at that bottle of Purell in a whole new light.


#14

Its because many people today think that any dating relationship is “good enough” to have sex without condoms…especially if they are on BC. No surprise lack of standards would result in this.


#15

Back in the 90s AIDS was viewed as a killer of not just homosexuals and drug users but also straight celebrities. “Safer sex” and a push for reduced promiscuity were huge campaigns. The “mixed message” if you will.

Now a days the campaigns don’t seem as big and AIDS is no longer the intermediate death sentence it was once viewed as. Hard to get the masses to practice restraint without a prominent menace.


#16

Before my wife retired she worked at a health clinic here in Florida…at one time it was known as the Chlamydia capital of the US in terms of per capita of population…there is also a large number of a certain ethnic population…unfortunately that can’t be argued as you’d be branded a racist…she said the ignorance was just unbelievable…no matter how much the clinic tried to educate people about safe sex it was just a waste of time…and personal hygiene…you don’t want to hear some of the stories about body odors…nurses have my empathy


#17

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