Still in sins as a Protestant?

Hey guys,

I’m currently a Protestant, but I am studying the Catholic faith. What is the Catholic Church’s view of me? David Currie in Born Fundamentalist, Born again Catholic said that the Catholic Church view Protestants as fully Christian, but with only 80% of the truth. Is this true?

Also, an Episcopalian friend of mine, who knows I am studying Catholicism, told me that I am still in my sins, from the Catholic perspective, since I had never gone to confession. Is this true. I was baptized two years ago, so what about my sins before my baptism? What about my sins between my baptism and the present?

Thanks in advance

Micah

[quote=BigTurkey]Hey guys,

I’m currently a Protestant, but I am studying the Catholic faith. What is the Catholic Church’s view of me? David Currie in Born Fundamentalist, Born again Catholic said that the Catholic Church view Protestants as fully Christian, but with only 80% of the truth. Is this true?
[/quote]

Pretty much.

Also, an Episcopalian friend of mine, who knows I am studying Catholicism, told me that I am still in my sins, from the Catholic perspective, since I had never gone to confession. Is this true. I was baptized two years ago, so what about my sins before my baptism? What about my sins between my baptism and the present?

Thanks in advance

Micah

Your Episcopalian friend needs to learn a little more about the Sacrament of Confession (BTW, many Episcopalians – though not a majority – make sacramental confessions; I used to do it all the time). Baptism wiped your slate totally clean. The only sins you are “in” are those since your baptism. If you come into the Church, your first confession, before you are received and confirmed, will need to cover only the period since your baptism.
So, that’s just about nothing – right?

[quote=BigTurkey]Hey guys,

I’m currently a Protestant, but I am studying the Catholic faith. What is the Catholic Church’s view of me? David Currie in Born Fundamentalist, Born again Catholic said that the Catholic Church view Protestants as fully Christian, but with only 80% of the truth. Is this true?
[/quote]

Yes, protestants rejected the fullness of truth in the 16th century and even removed certain books from the Bible. Many continue to reject the Truth. Also, some “catholics” reject certain truths, which is wrong and they’re not really catholic.

[quote=BigTurkey]Also, an Episcopalian friend of mine, who knows I am studying Catholicism, told me that I am still in my sins, from the Catholic perspective, since I had never gone to confession. Is this true. I was baptized two years ago, so what about my sins before my baptism? What about my sins between my baptism and the present?
[/quote]

The validity of the baptism depends on which formula was used. If the trinitarian formula was used, then it was valid. If not, you’d need to be properly baptised. If done with the trinitarian formula, all your past sins were washed away.

**As for confession, the Church holds that we must go to confession as often as possible whenever we’re in Grave Sin. However, in grave situations an act of contrition (or repentive prayer) is valid. For example, if you pray for forgiveness and die unexpectedly the next day, you will be forgiven. However, when we can, we must confess grave sin properly in order to recieve communion (the bread of life). Grave Sin or mortal sin is the sin done with full consent. Venial Sin is the sin done without full consent (like an impure thought that pops up). **

Also, If you’re in desire to become a catholic and are in the process of conversion, you’d already be embraced by the Church as her own. But, you’d still have to go through the process of learning and recieving the sacraments properly.

Hey my friend may the Lord bless you and guide you through your study and investagation of Our Precious Faith.
I will start be trying my best to answer your first Question. The Churh does diffenitly affirm that you would be considers a Christian. However to make it simple The Catholic church was founded by Jesus Christ Our Lord, And we have the deposit of faith meaning we have recieved the Fullness of the Faith and Truth from our Lord handed down to the Apostles and passed down through the generations. There are not many truths, but One Truth and God’s promise to found his Church and not let the gates of hell prevail against it, is no lie. So we basically say that we have the Fullness of truth.
Regarding your second question. It is not Catholic teaching to say that you cannot confess your sins to God and be forgiven. You may Confess you sins to the Lord directly. The Sacrement of confession is a gift from our Lord. the Word of Gods says to “Confess your sins to one another” , Christ also told his Apostles to go and forgive sins in his name and what sins they forgive will be forgiven. This is very clear in scripture. But we must Confess our sins to the Lord this is nessacary.
I hope that i have helped you understand the catholic understanding. May God Bless you and give you understanding and knowledge. :slight_smile:

[quote=cristian84]Hey my friend may the Lord bless you and guide you through your study and investagation of Our Precious Faith.
I will start be trying my best to answer your first Question. The Churh does diffenitly affirm that you would be considers a Christian. However to make it simple The Catholic church was founded by Jesus Christ Our Lord, And we have the deposit of faith meaning we have recieved the Fullness of the Faith and Truth from our Lord handed down to the Apostles and passed down through the generations. There are not many truths but One Truth and God’s promise to found his Church and not let the gates of hell prevail against it, is no lie. So we basically so the we have the Fullness of truth.
Regarding your second question. It is not Catholic teaching to say that you cannot confess your sins to God and be forgiven. You may Confess you sins to the Lord directly. The Sacrement of confession is a gift from our Lord. the Word of Gods says to “Confess your sins to one another” , Christ also told his Apostles to go and forgive sins in his name and what sins the forgive will be forgiven. This is very clear in scripture. But we must Confess our sins to the Lord this is nessacary.
I hope that i have helped you understand the catholic understanding. May God Bless you and give you understanding and knowledge. :slight_smile:
[/quote]

Well, if Turkey wasn’t confused before, he sure will be now!

Yes. We all confess directly to God. Every day. But when you enter the Church, you must confess mortal sin in order to be in the state of grace required for the reception of the Holy Eucharist.

Doubtless, at this stage in Turkey’s journey, if he were abruptly despatched to his eternal reward, he would be held to a different standard concerning confession than I would should the same fate befall me. Relax, Turkey. You’re OK.

Thanks for all of your answers. They were definitely helpful. People on this forum are so helpful and so quick to respond. I’m sorry that I often inundate everyone with questions.

Micah

I am sorry my friend I was not trying to confuse but to clarify. I have not said anything different from what you have said. I was trying to respond to his question “Also, an Episcopalian friend of mine, who knows I am studying Catholicism, told me that I am still in my sins, from the Catholic perspective, since I had never gone to confession. Is this true”. And to put it simple No it is not The Church also recognizes a Confession made directly to God, and not ony “in grave situations”. But this in no way down plays the role of the Sacrement of Confession. I hope thats a little clearer. :thumbsup:

[quote=cristian84]I am sorry my friend I was not trying to confuse but to clarify. I have not said anything different from what you have said. I was trying to respond to his question “Also, an Episcopalian friend of mine, who knows I am studying Catholicism, told me that I am still in my sins, from the Catholic perspective, since I had never gone to confession. Is this true”. And to put it simple No it is not The Church also recognizes a Confession made directly to God, and not ony “in grave situations”. But this in no way down plays the role of the Sacrement of Confession. I hope thats a little clearer. :thumbsup:
[/quote]

Bingo! (as we say in Catholic circles :smiley: )

[quote=BigTurkey]Thanks for all of your answers. They were definitely helpful. People on this forum are so helpful and so quick to respond. I’m sorry that I often inundate everyone with questions.

Micah
[/quote]

Hey there BigTurkey,

Keep asking those questions. I was thinking about this and you posted it. :thumbsup: I too am studying Catholicism.

Thanks for the explanation all.

:slight_smile: Melissa

I think it’s safe to say you have a lot of people on this forum praying for you - I know I am! God bless you as you think about your journey home.
:blessyou:

For anyone who does not have ready access to the Catholic Sacrament of Confession, an act of perfect contrition will suffice for the forgiveness of the guilt of all his sins until such time as he can access the Sacrament. Perfect contrition is sorrow for sins motivated by love of God; imperfect contrition is sorrow for sins motived by a lesser motive, such as fear of punishment.

If you can say the following or a similar prayer sincerely, the guilt of all your sins will be forgiven:

An Act of Perfect Contrition:
My God, I am sorry for my sins with all my heart. In choosing to do wrong and failing to do good, I have sinned against you whom I should love above all things. I firmly intend with your help, to do penance, to sin no more, and to avoid whatever leads me to sin. Our Savior Jesus Christ suffered and died for us. In his name, my God, have mercy.

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