Stoning punishment for adultery may be written into afghan law


#1

huff.to/1etLmYx

Again... The problem with religion influencing civil law.


#2

More like the hazard of SOME religious tenets being written into state-enforced law.

I think if you did serious research on English Common Law (from which ours is derived) you will find that virtually all of it is religious-based; even the Commercial Code. Decades ago, jurists even admitted it. They don't now, but they still follow precedent. If you went to a law library that contains really old volumes of cases, you would see that.

To know what truly secular law would look like, one would just about have to study the old Soviet penal codes; not how they were written but how they were enforced as a practical matter.


#3

[quote="SeannyM, post:1, topic:346237"]
huff.to/1etLmYx

Again... The problem with religion influencing civil law.

[/quote]

Our civil law in America has long been influenced by Christianity, and you don't see anyone stoning women here.

Seems to me you're just trying to equate apples to oranges.


#4

And besides, what we actually have here in America is the exact opposite, where the President and his administration are trying to tell religions when and how they can practice their expression, so I really don't see why you even bothered to post what you did.


#5

American lives are being sacrificed for the sake of Sharia law? No thanks.


#6

Adultry is not defined here. Do they define adultry as hand holding, not dressing modestly, showing the bottom of feet?

Christians sometimes define adultry as out of wedlock sexual contact.
When I think of "Stoning to death" I think of how St Joseph saved Jesus from being aborted; meaning abortion back then aborted the mother & baby. I also think of how Jesus said that those without sin could throw the first stone .... Would that cause the Peson who through the stone a sinner???


#7

yeah I guarantee no males are in any danger of being stoned just innocent women who showed an inch of skin or a woman whose husband has been beating her and cheating on her to the point were she runs off and is accused of adultery when hes the real culprit the islamic world is so one sided


#8

[quote="SeannyM, post:1, topic:346237"]
huff.to/1etLmYx

Again... The problem with religion influencing civil law.

[/quote]

Islam is more than just a religion, It is a whole political system as well and what is written in the Koran, is to be followed politically. There is no suprise here because most all of the Islamic countries that move to a strickter Sharia based society have stoning as its punishment. when my older brother was in Saudi Arabia, then definitely prided themselves on following the Koran and it's dictates and he reported many stonings for aduletry which is usually just the women and under Sharia law, there is no defense by a women against these allegations. This also includes rape which is likewise considered adultery.


#9

[quote="Giggly_Giraffe, post:6, topic:346237"]
Adultry is not defined here. Do they define adultry as hand holding, not dressing modestly, showing the bottom of feet?

Christians sometimes define adultry as out of wedlock sexual contact.
When I think of "Stoning to death" I think of how St Joseph saved Jesus from being aborted; meaning abortion back then aborted the mother & baby. I also think of how Jesus said that those without sin could throw the first stone .... Would that cause the Peson who through the stone a sinner???

[/quote]

Just to let you know, rape is considered adultery in Islamic law. The woman cannot defend herself and has to have 4 witnesses to the fact. Likewise, a women's testimony under Islamic sharia law is only 1/2 of a male. My brother lived for nearly a year in Saudi Arabia. he told me a story of a 14 year old girl that was gang raped and became pregnant. she was jailed for adultery, then they waited to stone her to death after she delivered the baby. How they stoned people was to bury them waste up in the ground then through large rocks at their head till they died. What a nice system.


#10

[quote="SeannyM, post:1, topic:346237"]
huff.to/1etLmYx

Again... The problem with religion influencing civil law.

[/quote]

Shouldn't Afghanistan allow religious freedom? Sharia is the law in Muslim countries, so let them have the laws they want.


#11

The problem with religion influencing civil law.

So I should logically expect places like, say, the Vatican, or various Amish areas, or certain eastern European countries to have laws like this, right? Oh wait, it's only certain middle-eastern countries. Why not just admit what the issue really is? It's not religion in general influencing the laws, it's Islam influencing the laws.


#12

[quote="robwar, post:9, topic:346237"]
Just to let you know, rape is considered adultery in Islamic law. The woman cannot defend herself and has to have 4 witnesses to the fact. Likewise, a women's testimony under Islamic sharia law is only 1/2 of a male. My brother lived for nearly a year in Saudi Arabia. he told me a story of a 14 year old girl that was gang raped and became pregnant. she was jailed for adultery, then they waited to stone her to death after she delivered the baby. How they stoned people was to bury them waste up in the ground then through large rocks at their head till they died. What a nice system.

[/quote]

I agree justice is short under this system and unfair. However, our culture allows women to rip the head, arms, & legs off the baby in the womb because of rape, wrong choices, abusive men, and simple life style choice. In both systems, innocent are silenced. In both sitters the problem stems from crimes against sexuality. The vast difference is will Mom goto the after life with baby. t's hard to play "I'm more moral than you" when our system is abusive to those without voices too. Again, I hear Jesus whisper, "let those of you without sin throw the first stone"


#13

Hello.

This is so depressing. Here is a prayer to end cruelty between all of us in this world:

Prayer of Saint Benedict of Nursia

O Lord, I place myself in your hands and dedicate myself to you. I pledge myself to do your will in all things: To love the Lord God with all my heart, all my soul, all my strength. Not to kill. Not to steal. Not to covet. Not to bear false witness. To honor all persons. Not to do to another what I would not wish done to myself. To chastise the body. Not to seek after pleasures. To love fasting. To relieve the poor. To clothe the naked. To visit the sick. To bury the dead. To help in trouble. To console the sorrowing. To hold myself aloof from worldly ways. To prefer nothing to the love of Christ. Not to give way to anger. Not to foster a desire for revenge. Not to entertain deceit in the heart. Not to make a false peace. Not to forsake charity. Not to swear, lest I swear falsely. To speak the truth with heart and tongue. Not to return evil for evil. To do no injury: yea, even to bear patiently any injury done to me. To love my enemies. Not to curse those who curse me, but rather to bless them. To bear persecution for justice' sake. Not to be proud. Not to be given to intoxicating drink. Not to be an over-eater. Not to be lazy. Not to be slothful. Not to be a murmurer. Not to be a detractor. To put my trust in God. To refer the good I see in myself to God. To refer any evil in myself to myself. To fear the Day of Judgment. To be in dread of hell. To desire eternal life with spiritual longing. To keep death before my eyes daily. To keep constant watch over my actions. To remember that God sees me everywhere. To call upon Christ for defense against evil thoughts that arises in my heart. To guard my tongue against wicked speech. To avoid much speaking. To avoid idle talk. To read only what is good to read. To look at only what is good to see. To pray often. To ask forgiveness daily for my sins, and to seek ways to amend my life. To obey my superiors in all things rightful. Not to desire to be thought holy, but to seek holiness. To fulfill the commandments of God by good works. To love chastity. To hate no one. Not to be jealous or envious of anyone. Not to love strife. Not to love pride. To honor the aged. To pray for my enemies. To make peace after a quarrel, before the setting of the sun. Never to despair of your mercy, O God of Mercy. Amen.


#14

[quote="Giggly_Giraffe, post:12, topic:346237"]
I agree justice is short under this system and unfair. However, our culture allows women to rip the head, arms, & legs off the baby in the womb because of rape, wrong choices, abusive men, and simple life style choice. In both systems, innocent are silenced. In both sitters the problem stems from crimes against sexuality. The vast difference is will Mom goto the after life with baby. t's hard to play "I'm more moral than you" when our system is abusive to those without voices too. Again, I hear Jesus whisper, "let those of you without sin throw the first stone"

[/quote]

Giggle,
no said that we are more moral or better and the comparison to abortion and then step back and say that because we wrongly have legal abortion so we can't say anything about sharia law how that is being implimented is silly at best. You need to realize that in large muslem onclaves in Europe and our country, there is a push to consider sharia law and have that override western constitutional law. Pointing that out is fact not we are better than them but realize that no woman is going to want to live under it.


#15

[quote="tjones80, post:10, topic:346237"]
Shouldn't Afghanistan allow religious freedom? Sharia is the law in Muslim countries, so let them have the laws they want.

[/quote]

I am not sure if you realize the logic of this thinking. Sharia law calls for a death sentence to anyone that leaves Islam, the persecution of Christians, slavery, rape, etc and thats ok with you because it's over in those Muslim countries and it doesn't bother you here. So when Sharia law allows marriage of 9 year old girls, that's ok with you because it's over in those Muslim countries. However, those Muslim countries want to bring it to you in the US and especially Europe and liberal sucker judges consider it and go along. Sharia law is not religous freedom and it's enforcement is not a laughing matter in some far away place and it is pie in the sky thinking that it won't effect you.


#16

[quote="SeannyM, post:1, topic:346237"]
huff.to/1etLmYx

Again... The problem with religion influencing civil law.

[/quote]

Do liberals now dislike Islam?


#17

probably won’t happen because it’s not Judeo-Christian so in liberal lala land it’s ok.


#18

Regrettable and perverse. :mad:

And this is being justified in the name of "traditional values" and "local culture".

This perversion is even being submitted at the international level: look at the list of signatories here, and see if you don't recognize a pattern...

dropbox.com/s/3k1czumu433ykks/TV-resolution-adopted.doc

This has nothing to do with God or true religion. God does not want the sinner to perish, but desires that he repent and live (Ezekiel 18). Any religion that teaches otherwise is a lie and a man-made fabrication. This is more about human authority and domination than about the true meaning of religion or values.


#19

I think when it comes to mistreatment of women and homosexuals, they do. When it comes to anti-westernism, particularly anti-Americanism, I think they still like the Islamic radicals.


#20

[quote="livingwordunity, post:16, topic:346237"]
Do liberals now dislike Islam?

[/quote]

I don't think liberals are ever going to support a religion that treats entire groups of people badly, like Islam does. As a liberal, I do support their right to hold those beliefs… But the thing we dislike the most is the influence of religion on civil law… regardless of which religion it is.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.