Stop immediately assuming everything is demonic

#21

I imagine the devil would like to have people with untreated mental illness panicking that every itch or sneeze or weird dream is a sign of demonic oppression, yes.

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#22

We mess ourselves up badly enough on our own that we leave the demons with nothing to do.

D

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#23

And sometimes people who have completely innocuous explanations seem to refuse anything other than a “Yes you’re dealing with the supernatural.” response. Out of charity’s sake I won’t mention the cases I’m thinking of.

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#24

Nownif it were more than one person in the same room who saw the same exact thing, like more than five, then I guess psychiatry is still the answer. Nothing to see here folks, no demons, you are simply overreacting.

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#25

I get that you’re attempting sarcasm, but if you read what I said with even a little bit of attention you’ll notice I said several times that I don’t dispute that occasionally genuinely supernatural things occur.

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#26

Sometimes people deliberately put themselves in a position to open a door to the demonic. Some think it’s fun to experiment with different occult practices, and when something goes amiss, they are scared. Possession is sometimes the result of messing with seances or whatever.

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#28

Fr Amorth is an experienced exorcist

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#29

That is really funny

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#30

Fr. Amorth was an experienced exorcist; he’s deceased, but it’s immaterial because I wasn’t doubting him in the least. My final sentence contains the brass tacks of my point, which I believed to be supporting the OP’s statement.

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#31

I agree that demonic activity is to be considered after a medical r/o.

Having said that, as we watch our society gallop into a post-Christian mentality, more and more people are turning to the “harmless” pursuits of astrology, Tarot cards, Ouija boards, etc. There’s no denying this is a deliberate opening of the door to demonic activity. Now, I don’t know how many “free passes” you get whereby you can open the door, then close it and walk away unscathed, but it would make sense to me if there was an increase in demonic interference. Again, that doesn’t mean all, or even most, cases of people thinking they are demon possessed is true, but it isn’t something that should be dismissed out of hand, either.

Interesting topic.

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#32

Or the window is open on a windy day, …

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#33

Of course, with Satanists pushing their agenda, like “After School Satan Clubs,” putting statues of the devil in public places, and black masses, they seem to be unaware of the danger they are putting everyone in. It could bring the reality of a Satanic society to fruition.

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#34

Really? I’ve read a few of Fr. Amroth’s books, and they didn’t leave me with that impression. I think Fr. Amroth discussed cases in which the patient had already sought medical advice.

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#35

are you the same guy as the composer who was on Lawrence Welk?

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#36

a lot of these so-called “satanists” are really university students with way too much time on their hands. Dabbling with the occult in this manner is highly dangerous, and priests should start saying masses of reparation for this and publicise the masses, saying what they are for, if nothing else, to make clear that the Church can and will actively combat the work of ill-advised occultists.

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#37

If your experience reading his books is different from mine, then good for you. As for me, I noticed that my own thoughts tended to go the way of the people about whom the OP was speaking: like I said in my post. At least one other user had already mentioned Fr. Amorth and sundry others by the time I had made that post, so it was a valid response.

Maybe you should go back and read my first paragraph. You should specifically do so in the context of the OP’s question. You should probably also keep in mind the very definition of the deductive reasoning I cited.

At what point did I doubt the existence of the demonic or the validity of diocesan exorcists?

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#38

Exactly, I think this is the right advice.

If people go to confession and speak to the priest they are best to advise. I think the opposite. We are too quick to dismiss the devil and say it’s just illness, just my imagination etc. I have been told by priests in confession to watch out for the devil and his wily ways I am not always talking about massive horrible demonic things, even just temptations. I think we should be more aware of how subtle he is and weary of him and his little tricks and stop forgetting about him. That is after all his best trick to make people think he doesnt exist.

Sorry this is all in reply to you… it is meant to all. Just to say I agree with you… confession cure’s all things. Then he knows he’s been outed even if he’s just deceiving you. Of course it can be the world or your own will which is deceiving you too. But not every time something is a little out of the ordinary should people run to their doctor. I for one would go to my priest first and if he suggests my doctor then I would listen as it is after all Jesus speaking to me.

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#39

I’m not disputing that yours was or wasn’t a valid response. All responses are valid. As for the context of the original post:

“In a lot of (not all) cases, people immediately assume they’re correct and start advising them to see a priest…Please, please, please remember that we should rule out medical explanations before we start thinking something is metaphysical. The first question in all these threads should be “have you seen a doctor?””

I assume that in all cases treated by Fr Amorth, the first question to the patient (before they even saw Fr. Amorth) would have been to rule out a medical reason.

Furthermore, I agree with an earlier poster who suggested that the phenomenon (that of assuming every illness is due to the demonic) is cultural. There are a lot of different cultures coming together on this forum (with a wider psychological/cultural makeup than that of the average parish), and we have to accommodate our reasoning with this in mind.

You didn’t doubt the existence of the demonic or the validity of diocesan exorcists. I don’t know why you think we dispute this fact.

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#40

I wouldn’t go to a doctor about something demonic.

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#41

We are discussing correct procedure beforehand so as to ascertain the problem definitely isn’t medical.

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