Stores destroying clothes instead of donating

This is SO true! I think it really is time for a jubilee year. Maybe this economy will force us too it.

I wonder how slashed up the clothing is when they dump it. It seems like someone who can do some basic sewing might be able to sew up a few rips or use some of the fabric for quilting or rag rugs or something useful. I agree with the idea that donating the items directly to a homeless or domestic violence shelter would ensure that people who can pay for items don’t get the clothes. It seems like an easy tax deduction for the stores also. I really dislike waste that could be avoided.

I was just thinking about that. Zippers are easy to fix but I would say it would depend on the material the garment is made of if holes can be fixed.

Somewhere in the world someone is wearing a “Patriots 19-0” shirt.

I think a lot of companies throw stuff out is that they are afraid of a law suite. If they donate something and that something malfunctions and causes damage there would be a lawyer ready to take the company to court.

I doubt that, unless the product was pulled from production due to defects.

Hope that this thread would be a reminder for us all, to take a glance into our own lives too, for occasions of wasted graces … doing the morning offering , to make use of all indulgences … a way to set hearts free from the grips of little or large hatreds , in the grand and merciful plan of The Father through ’ the communion of saints ’ …there are indulgences for reading the scripture too -

beingbob.wordpress.com/2008/04/10/indulgence-for-reading-the-bible/

Hope too that some of the large charities who send donations esp. to overseas locations such as the poor in wartorn areas with lots of refugees would take note and make arrangements , to make use of what could be a win -win situation …the stores being able to hopefully get atelast tax deductions and some goodwill publicity as well …may be even a collaboration of good large charities , with something like a Better Business Bureau like emblem that tell shoppers that they care …

Our Holy Father calling for conservation of resources also seems the timely message for these occasions …

meanwhile, another area of waste related to China is reported to be in what ‘seems’ rather small - how she floods markets with plastic scapulars , instead of The Church recommended wool ones …unsure if the many wearing these unawares , the many even Catholic places selling them …if they are loosing out on graces …

Meawhile ,may every occasion of walking through Walmart also be an occasion of deeper prayer …for the millions of small human lives wasted …

? and may be even a few green scapulars, left in charity , for its special charsim of conversion of hearts …asking for The Mother to intercede … ( and hoping that China does not have evil intent for the many airstrips she is reportedly building along the border with India -after all, her neighbor to the north , Mongolia has lots of land …same ethnicity …all it needs is conversion of hearts )

 Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray for us now and at the hour of our death !

I’m not defending this but I have seen warehouses operated by Goodwill with boxes stacked to the roof with rotting clothes.

It's not just retailers.

Also let’s not be too quick to judge. When I was active duty I seen soldiers take large electric magnets and zap pallets of software I went to complain like couldn’t we donate it schools or something.

By law they could not give it away copyright laws.

Also if Wal-Mart donated the clothing maybe those originations would resale it undercutting Wal-Marts profit.

[FONT=Georgia]Wal-Mart keeps spot as top corporate charity[/FONT]

Seeking to blunt criticism, firm says it gave more than $272 million in 2006

increased its U.S. charitable giving 10 percent last year to $272.9 million, the world’s largest retailer said Tuesday, likely defending its position as the country’s largest corporate donor of cash.[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana]The rate of growth was lower than a year earlier, when Hurricane Katrina relief helped push the annual rise to 19 percent, but it was ahead of [/FONT]7 percent rise in net profit last year. The company’s profit for the fiscal year that ended Jan. 31 was $12.2 billion.[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana]Bentonville, Ark.-based Wal-Mart released its annual donation numbers a few days after publicizing its annual bonuses to hourly store workers as it seeks to counter union-led critics by defending its record as a corporate citizen.[/FONT]
[/FONT]http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17803920/

For me, it seems like a no brainer that it is better to give away a product to someone who needs it rather than destroy it. However, I keep trying to look at the “big picture” to see what I might be missing, particularly in light of CatholicGerman’s and novaslasher’s posts 3 and 4 (respectively) in this thread.

If the local Walmart (or any other big company) was giving stuff away to the local charities, I know I would be checking them out to see what great discounts I could get. I’m sure a lot of people would do the same. Loss of business would turn into loss of jobs, which would then mean even more people in need of cheap/free alternatives. Pretty soon, you have more and more people dependant upon these freebies with a whole lot of companies unable to sustain their business.

I just toss this out there as something to think about. It might not be as simple as “those greedy WalMart people are at it again! :mad:”. There might actually be just reasons for such a practice. Of course, it’s also possible I’m stretching too far to give them the benefit of the doubt. :shrug:

I volunteered at the local St. Vincent de Paul thrift store and saw this–a back room piled to the ceiling with rotting clothes while the workers obsessed about whether or not clothing should be marked down. Oh and did I mention that the manager liked to pull the “good” donations to sell on Ebay–with profits going to St.VdP but…still. And clothes that were brand name or had tags were marked up rather than letting people get a good deal. Lots of stuff in that store I know I could buy new for less than they were selling it.

I hate waste and greed but it’s not just Walmart–and while I still donate our stuff I hate knowing that it will end up hoarded in a back room or pulled to sell on Ebay. I donate so less fortunate people can get stuff for cheap…:shrug:

From the story:

The New York Times points out that one-third of the city’s population is poor, which makes this behavior not only wasteful and sad, but downright irresponsible. Wal-Mart spokeswoman, Melissa Hill, acted surprised that these items were found, claiming they typically donate all unworn merchandise to charity. When reporters went around the corner from H&M to a collections drop-off for charity organization New York Cares, spokesperson Colleen Farrell said, “We’d be glad to take unworn coats, and companies often send them to us."

shine.yahoo.com/channel/beauty/h-m-and-wal-mart-destroy-and-trash-unsold-goods-562909/

So it looks like the plastic bags of clothes were found in ONE Wal-Mart store in New York City.

I stand corrected Wal-Mart does donate **ALL **UNWORN merchandise to charity.

Here is another fact:
Wal-Mart provides over $400 million dollars a year to charities around the world.

The story about the clothes being thrown away was done by the New York Times and of course we all know they’re not biased. :rolleyes:

So it looks like the plastic bags of clothes were found in ONE Wal-Mart store in New York City.

I stand corrected Wal-Mart does donate ALL UNWORN merchandise to charity.

Why do you accept the statement of the Wal-Mart spokesman without any criticism? She's obviously biased herself, moreso than the New York Times. Even if the Times has a liberal agenda, that doesn't necessarily involve a vendetta against Wal-Mart, but a spokesperson's agenda clearly involves making her company look better.

There's no proof of that statement anywhere.

So show us some proof that Wal-Mart don’t donate?

[FONT=Arial]BTW: That’s Spokeswoman.[/FONT]

Evil Wal-Mart did this in November:

Walmart Foundation Kicks-Off $32 Million Holiday Giving Campaign with Historic Hunger Relief Effort

Donated Refrigerator Trucks Expected to Help 35 U.S. Food Banks Provide 41 Million Additional Meals to Families in Need

BENTONVILLE, Ark., Nov. 3, 2009 – Today, Walmart and the Walmart Foundation kicked-off “Walmart Gives Back,” a holiday giving initiative that will provide $32 million in monetary and in-kind donations to charitable organizations across the U.S. Executives from Feeding America and Meals On Wheels joined Walmart to launch the historic campaign by sending off a convoy of 35 trucks donated by the Walmart Foundation.

Valued at $3 million and loaded with Great Value-branded products and fresh apples, the new refrigerator trucks will arrive at Feeding America food banks in Miami, Indianapolis, New Orleans, Boston, Memphis and 30 other communities in time for Thanksgiving. Feeding America estimates that these refrigerator trucks will enable the food banks to transport up to 52.5 million pounds of food, the equivalent of 41 million additional meals, per year.

“In this economy, families and seniors across the country who rely on food banks have been hit especially hard,” said Margaret McKenna, president of the Walmart Foundation. “As Walmart stores continue to be the price leader on groceries, our partnership with Feeding America is helping us do our part to put more food on the dinner table. Our business and our charitable giving are united in the commitment to eradicate hunger in America.”

There are a lot of places to donate unused items, I don’t generally donate to goodwill, and st vincent, just because they resale you items for profit and I to have known people that have volunteered who say they have to much clothing and they sell there used clothing for way to much money, someone who really can’t afford the clothing wouldn’t be able to afford it here either. Plus employees and volunteers go through each shipment and take out the nicest stuff to take home, yes for themselves. My husband and I prefer to donate to the domestic violence shelter that always appreciates and gives to people that really need help starting over, we give to the homeless shelters, as well as safe harbor crisis nursery, these organizations give to clients in real need. Just my thought that retail owners could truly help these people. Also foster children, often times have absolutely nothing, there provided 100. A year to buy something for themselves, and as a former foster child I know that doesn’t go very far. Big cooperation should do the same.

So show us some proof that Wal-Mart don’t donate?

There’s no proof that they regularly donate clothes, either. The story says that they don’t; the spokesperson (as its not offensive either way, and the woman involved doesn’t have a preference, I’ll use whichever word I prefer) says that they do.

You provided sources that they regular donate money to other charities, which doesn’t even address what they do with clothes.

Well, I’m going to give an opposing reply here.

#1 The fact that we’re over-producing for the needs of the the country doesn’t require us to keep it all.

#2 At the very least, someone in a third-world country got some pay for making it. I know we’re all opposed to slave-like labor, but for folks in those countries, some pay is better than none. (And, yes, we should continue to urge better wages, etc. However, after listening to a Chinese Christian pointing out that boycotting China simply meant the poor would get poorer, I have to wonder about such practices are truly helpful.)

#3 After being instructed to take our bags of donated clothing “around back” to the warehouse of a Goodwill, I was shocked to see the bags thrown onto a HUGE pile of other donated stuff, none of which would probably ever be sorted. I decided I wasn’t going to strain myself to donate stuff.

#4 For the person who suggested fixing the clothes to be sold, you must not sew. Fixing bad zippers is time-consuming and zippers aren’t cheap. Sewing is time-consuming to simply have it thrown into The Pile. In fact, those of us who sew do so for reasons of modesty, not for the cost factor.

I realize these things could have been donated to a local charity, but are these charities actually in need of the donations? We can point to the homeless, etc., but there are places for them to get clothing and still we have more and more and more of it.

I’m not necessarily saying I agree with what these companies are doing. Personally, I think Haiti could use those clothes right now. But I’m disposing of used clothing more than I did before because it’s simply not needed. Unless the stuff is in great shape with no stains, etc., I don’t bother to donate it. And I have found a place to take it that has a good system for sorting everything that comes in. But I have a feeling they get tired of sorting other people’s garbage.

One last thought, if Wal-Mart couldn’t get rid of it on clearance, what kind of ugly stuff is this anyway?

Tracy

From Forbes this is an older article
http://www.forbes.com/2005/11/11/charities-corporations-giving-cx_lm_1114charity.html

From Northwest Arkansas Online:

Friday, April 03, 2009

*Wal-Mart ups charity donations *

Wal-Mart, the company many leftists love to hate, donated over $400 million to charity in the year that ended January 31. That's over $85 million more than the prior year.

Northwest Arkansas Online has more:
"During these tough economic times, we know we have a responsibility to continually look for ways to increase our giving and focus our local contributions towards organizations that can do the most good — and have a lasting, positive impact in communities around the globe," said Margaret McKenna, Wal-Mart Foundation president.

Wal-Mart gifts included:

• $378 million in donations in the U.S., an increase from the $296 million given the prior year.

• $45.5 million in donations in international markets, an increase from the $41 million in donations the prior year.

Agreeing with the bolded statement below. As my grandmother said, don't give it away it it is missing buttons--the poor don't have buttons to sew on either! So I also do carefully sort clothes to give away and only donate those that are in good shape. However, the original article was talking about brand-new clothes that the store couldn't sell.

I do understand the concern about under-cutting their own profits by donating to a charity thriftshop right around the corner. My thought is that perhaps their buyer needs to adjust so that they don't end up with so much unsold merchandise to begin with!

I am glad to see that Wal-mart does give to charity. (I suspected that would be the case.) However, it still seems as if their merchandising in NYC could use a little tweaking.

[quote="Tracy_Spenst, post:37, topic:182329"]
Well, I'm going to give an opposing reply here.

1 The fact that we're over-producing for the needs of the the country doesn't require us to keep it all.

2 At the very least, someone in a third-world country got some pay for making it. I know we're all opposed to slave-like labor, but for folks in those countries, some pay is better than none. (And, yes, we should continue to urge better wages, etc. However, after listening to a Chinese Christian pointing out that boycotting China simply meant the poor would get poorer, I have to wonder about such practices are truly helpful.)

3 After being instructed to take our bags of donated clothing "around back" to the warehouse of a Goodwill, I was shocked to see the bags thrown onto a HUGE pile of other donated stuff, none of which would probably ever be sorted. I decided I wasn't going to strain myself to donate stuff.

4 For the person who suggested fixing the clothes to be sold, you must not sew. Fixing bad zippers is time-consuming and zippers aren't cheap. Sewing is time-consuming to simply have it thrown into The Pile. In fact, those of us who sew do so for reasons of modesty, not for the cost factor.

I realize these things could have been donated to a local charity, but are these charities actually in need of the donations? We can point to the homeless, etc., but there are places for them to get clothing and still we have more and more and more of it.

I'm not necessarily saying I agree with what these companies are doing. Personally, I think Haiti could use those clothes right now. But I'm disposing of used clothing more than I did before because it's simply not needed. *Unless the stuff is in great shape with no stains, etc., I don't bother to donate it. * And I have found a place to take it that has a good system for sorting everything that comes in. But I have a feeling they get tired of sorting other people's garbage.

One last thought, if Wal-Mart couldn't get rid of it on clearance, what kind of ugly stuff is this anyway?

Tracy

[/quote]

I pray that they will donate clothing and other items to the victims of the Haiti quake. The orphans could use clothing every day of the year and not slow the economy one cent. This way no one can say that the clothing will compete with local stores.

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