Story at Catholic Exchange


#1

Hey all,

I’m not sure where to post this, but it DOES involve apologetics, so that’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

Catholic Exchange posted a story I wrote in their fiction section. It’s the second one I’ve placed there, so I’m pretty jazzed about it. Unfortunately, as is the case with other things I’ve managed to get published, seeing it in the light of day horrifies me.

But whatever. I’m not going to keep apologizing for it. Here’s the article: catholicexchange.com/vm/index.asp?vm_id=109&art_id=29430

It’s a light-hearted look at what happens when a Protestant finds himself in Purgatory.


#2

Nice short story, it is entertaining.

Scylla


#3

I liked it. Very cute.


#4

Pretty good. I enjoyed it.


#5

Very good story. I enjoy this type of fiction.


#6

I liked it, too. Cute story. :slight_smile:

Elizabeth


#7

I also really enjoyed it.

I am curious about one thing, well actually two things…

  1. Is it an official teaching that if a person in purgatory prays, it can’t help him?
  2. Do you care to share any of your thinking behind putting Karl Marx in purgatory but Matt Groening “somewhere else”?

–Bill


#8

[quote=Mot Juste]I also really enjoyed it.

I am curious about one thing, well actually two things…

  1. Is it an official teaching that if a person in purgatory prays, it can’t help him?
  2. Do you care to share any of your thinking behind putting Karl Marx in purgatory but Matt Groening “somewhere else”?

–Bill
[/quote]

As far as I know, you can’t pray your way out of it. I could be wrong, though, as I am on other details…

My thinking about putting Marx in Purgatory but not Matt Groening? Actually, if I was God, it probably would be the other way around. But I wanted to subtly put in a bit about how we’ll likely all be surprised in the end. I think I was too subtle, though, and it just comes off as arbitrary.

Thanks, all, for your compliments. I’m sure Graham Greene’s polite critics once described his early stories as “nice,” “pretty good,” and “cute,” too. :wink:


#9

I laughed it was funny


#10

[quote=montanaman]As far as I know, you can’t pray your way out of it. I could be wrong, though, as I am on other details…
[/quote]

I think it was a good way of illustrating the idea that we will probably want to pray when we reach the purgation - we will be so very grateful and relieved, right? But at the same time, the type and time and place of purgation is God’s choosing and plan, not ours, so the idea that we can’t “pray our way out” (unless our particular judgement requires it) certainly fits.

My thinking about putting Marx in Purgatory but not Matt Groening? Actually, if I was God, it probably would be the other way around. But I wanted to subtly put in a bit about how we’ll likely all be surprised in the end. I think I was too subtle, though, and it just comes off as arbitrary.

Ahhhhhh… that was a point that had me wondering. Makes sense, now. :slight_smile:

Your including Marx in purgatory seems to me to be a “Christian thing” to do - it reminds us that we rarely ever know much about what happens in any particular judgement.

But, I’m not sure that there’s anyone who you could have mentioned specifically as going to hell because as you say, it comes off as arbitrary unless you use someone notorious, like Osama bin Laden or Hitler. But “OBL in hell” has been done to death, and while we can think that he belongs there, we can’t know God’s mind.

Our human minds crave vengeance for those people who flew airliners into buildings and murdered 3,000 innocent people. But, we are required to pray for the murderers as well as the victims - if we make assumptions, we ARE going to be surprised because our minds don’t work like God’s.

I don’t know how you could get that point into this story without going off onto a “side-street.”

It’s my own personal belief that when we reach the purification, we will know exactly what it is and what we’re there for. We will question nothing about the experience, itself, though our questions that remain from this life will have to wait until we are in the presence of God to be answered. I don’t think anyone will cling to beliefs that they held on earth.

I think it’s going to be a little like a new reality tv show - “Extreme Conversion,” where the scales fall off your eyes in a startling way. I had a shock when I realized that I was Christian, but it’s like I knew that everything I was reading was Truth with a capital ‘t,’ and all my previous beliefs simply flaked away - nothing with which to concern myself any further. I think Purgatory might be something like that, only on a massive, cataclysmic scale.

But overall, I thought it was a cute story with some good Biblical and Catholic references. It made me smile, even though I didn’t pick up the meaning of the Groenig thing. :slight_smile:

Keep writing - you’ve got a gift and you’re using it to proclaim the mercy of God. :slight_smile:

Elizabeth


#11

I liked the story. Very entertaining. :thumbsup:


closed #12

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.