Studying in Sunday


#1

Is it wrong or a sin study today?

For laziness I didn't study to my two test of tomorrow.
I went to Mass today.
So I intend to study the whole night, Is it a sin?


#2

No. The no-work-on-Sunday rule does not apply to "intellectual work" like schoolwork. You should not, however, let it impede worship or family time, and you should get some rest.

Good luck on your tests. :)


#3

[quote="polytropos, post:2, topic:329232"]
No. The no-work-on-Sunday rule does not apply to "intellectual work" like schoolwork. You should not, however, let it impede worship or family time, and you should get some rest.

Good luck on your tests. :)

[/quote]

Really intellectual works are prohibited too
But It's is something [a little] important so Can I do it?


#4

I mean: No, it’s not a sin because it’s intellectual work. Study away!


#5

[quote="polytropos, post:4, topic:329232"]
I mean: No, it's not a sin because it's intellectual work. Study away!

[/quote]

I mean: Intellectual work is "prohibited" too


#6

[quote="Catholicus19, post:1, topic:329232"]
Is it wrong or a sin study today?

For laziness I didn't study to my two test of tomorrow.
I went to Mass today.
So I intend to study the whole night, Is it a sin?

[/quote]

Studying is for students a condition of their state of life. This means it is a duty and it can become a prayer when we unite it to the work of Christ, one that can benefit souls and give glory to the Lord.

It is not good, however, to disregard your health. One must have an orderly way of doing things, and take responsibility for what goes wrong. Studying all night is quite often necessary when there is no other way out - but if it becomes a habit, it greatly harms us physically but especially mentally. That ought to stimulate us to be more productive, that we may sleep a sufficient amount of time every night.

Also, this is a result of a vice, and vice leads to sin. Trust me, as someone who is always a student, I understand that we often term laziness what sometimes truly isn't, but I also know the truth of the saying "laziness is the father of all vices". Often, fixes, patches and finding our way out or around even through amazing and praiseworthy efforts simply reinforces our laziness - we become more and more "last minute people" and what is worse, we become prideful because we trust in ourselves - we think we can do it, we can manage to survive at the last minute. But we don't get rid of a vice unless we hate its cause and replace it with a virtue. Thus, we must develop a distaste for wasting time and going off schedule, and become more diligent and committed to our schedule (a good way is to work hard on keeping fixed prayer times - they will help the rest of the day fall into the right places).

Going to Holy Mass is not the way out of honoring the Lord's Day :) The precept of Holy Church is that we must attend Holy Mass on the Lord's Day and other Holy Days of Obligation - not that this fulfills the Third Commandment. "The Sunday Eucharist is the foundation and confirmation of all Christian practice. Participation in the communal celebration of the Sunday Eucharist is a testimony of belonging and of being faithful to Christ and to his Church. "

The Third Commandment reminds us that the Lord's Day, "the fist day of the week", is a sacred, solemn day. It is not about not doing anything, but about respecting its holiness and remember that just like we need enough sleep at night, we need that one day for our own physical, mental, and spiritual health. Jesus said: "The sabbath was made for man, not man for the sabbath. My Father is always at his work to this very day, and I too am working. The Son of Man is lord even of the sabbath.". Properly understood, this signifies that we can and must still fulfill the obligations of our state of life and do God's will, but unlike an ordinary day, this day is the Lord's - so we must try to spend time with Him and find refreshment that will be needed for the rest of the week. Or, as the Catechism nicely states:

the faithful are to refrain from engaging in work or activities that hinder the worship owed to God, the joy proper to the Lord's Day, the performance of the works of mercy, and the appropriate relaxation of mind and body.

The faithful should see to it that legitimate excuses do not lead to habits prejudicial to religion, family life, and health.

Every Christian should avoid making unnecessary demands on others that would hinder them from observing the Lord's Day.

But the Catechism also reminds us of our obligations and the duty they impose on us by quoting St. Augustine, who brings both things together:

The charity of truth seeks holy leisure- the necessity of charity accepts just work.

Wish you well on your exam!


#7

At Last, I can turn night studying without sinning?


#8

[quote="Catholicus19, post:1, topic:329232"]
Is it wrong or a sin study today?

For laziness I didn't study to my two test of tomorrow.
I went to Mass today.
So I intend to study the whole night, Is it a sin?

[/quote]

If its necessary then it's allowed, although in the future you should study on other days. Would it perhaps be possible to wait until midnight to study?

[quote="polytropos, post:4, topic:329232"]
I mean: No, it's not a sin because it's intellectual work. Study away!

[/quote]

The canon was changed so that intellectual work was no longer permitted en masse.


#9

Hi,
I'm a student too, and I try not to study on Sundays. Some people will say that study, being intellectual work, is alright, but I don't see how, it being my duty to study just like it would be my duty to farm the fields or work the desk or whatever else I would do in the working world.

In those tight spots, I do what you just said: try to get some rest before midnight, wake up after midnight, and study away.

I have to say, I've found that I've never been in a situation that God didn't help me to do well on over-the-weekend papers and tests and things.

Hope that helps. God bless!


#10

[quote="Catholicus19, post:7, topic:329232"]
At Last, I can turn night studying without sinning?

[/quote]

No, if you gather a right intention, acknowledge it as a penance for not having done things well, and offer the sacrifice to Christ, promising to work on having a more orderly life :)


#11

[quote="beaumains, post:9, topic:329232"]
Some people will say that study, being intellectual work, is alright, but I don't see how, it being my duty to study just like it would be my duty to farm the fields or work the desk or whatever else I would do in the working world.

[/quote]

The 1917 code of canon law permitted intellectual work on Sunday. Some people don't realize that the 1983 code changed that.


#12

When did thinking become “servile work?”


#13

[quote="Tarpeian_Rock, post:12, topic:329232"]
When did thinking become "servile work?"

[/quote]

When the canon ceased to specifically prohibit "servile work".


#14

[quote="Tarpeian_Rock, post:12, topic:329232"]
When did thinking become "servile work?"

[/quote]

When people ran out of reasons to NOT do their homework and study of course! :rotfl:


#15

[quote="Catholicus19, post:1, topic:329232"]
Is it wrong or a sin study today?

For laziness I didn't study to my two test of tomorrow.
I went to Mass today.
So I intend to study the whole night, Is it a sin?

[/quote]

You know, you're not the first kid to ask this question. Many before you have. I did too. The priest told me to study (on Sunday) to make up for my laziness to do it when it wasn't Sunday. If you feel badly about studying on Sunday (look up the word scrupulosity while you're at it), then get your work done before Sunday. :D


#16

[quote="Rence, post:14, topic:329232"]
When people ran out of reasons to NOT do their homework and study of course! :rotfl:

[/quote]

Or when they decided to start making the worst possible assumptions about random people on the internet.


#17

Someone already quoted the Catechism, but since we're on the second page, I'll quote it again.

2185 On Sundays and other holy days of obligation, the faithful are to refrain from engaging in work or activities that hinder the worship owed to God, the joy proper to the Lord's Day, the performance of the works of mercy, and the appropriate relaxation of mind and body.123 Family needs or important social service can legitimately excuse from the obligation of Sunday rest. The faithful should see to it that legitimate excuses do not lead to habits prejudicial to religion, family life, and health.

The charity of truth seeks holy leisure- the necessity of charity accepts just work.124

Since poor grades can have a bad impact on life (flunking one course kept me out of vet school), I think you have a legitimate excuse.

In your place, I would study, take it to Confession, and resolve not to do it again - which means putting study time on your calendar.

Advice from my experience:

  1. Don't study all night. Lack of sleep affects your memory. Get a few hours of sleep. Also, the latest studies seem to prove what us coffee freaks have known for years: caffeine actually helps your thought processes. Don't overdo it, though. Getting the jitters is not helpful.

  2. In the future, find someone you can help to learn your subject. Teaching is the best way to learn! When you have to organize what you know into a form that someone else can understand, it burns it into your brain!

Good luck, and may God bless your work tonight!


#18

So It’s a new Monday, I can study now without sinning :smiley:


#19

[quote="Rence, post:15, topic:329232"]
You know, you're not the first kid to ask this question. Many before you have. I did too. The priest told me to study (on Sunday) to make up for my laziness to do it when it wasn't Sunday. If you feel badly about studying on Sunday (look up the word scrupulosity while you're at it), then get your work done before Sunday. :D

[/quote]

I'm scrupulous because I have OCD :p


#20

Do you know how you did on your exams yet? :slight_smile:


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