Sunday - going to restaurants

Dear all,

A nun talked about keeping Sunday holy and not going to restaurants, shopping, etc on Sundays.
I don’t go shopping or movies on Sundays, I only go to have lunch at restaurants after Sunday Mass. Is that alright? That’s not a sin, is it?
Those restaurants I patronize are run by pagans, they don’t keep Sunday holy anyway. Is that ok?

Thank you.

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I see her point. I also don’t think your patronage (or lack of it) is going to be the difference between the restaurant being opened or close on Sunday, either. If you enjoy going, I’d still go. Shopping maybe not so much, unless it’s truly for your own rejuvenation (“retail therapy!”)

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OP, read this thread:

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If it’s not a weekly thing that is always done on Sunday just because it’s Sunday I would think it would be ok for special occasions.

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Because of our work schedules (DH works long hours, I have to work every other weekend), our family picks up pizza on the Sunday nights I work.
And then because of working the overnight shift, I go through the McDonalds drive through for their ice coffee. Lots of caffeine for a wonderful artificial energy boost🙂

Honestly, I never thought of the morality of it…

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I onced asked a priest an he said that shopping isn’t ok, going to restaurants is.

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Yeah that’s what I learned too. I think the justification was that we need to eat every day, so either we cook or go to a restaurant; either way some work is necessary. We don’t need to go shopping every day.

I think that going to the movies is ok too. I am not that strict. I think we should avoid shopping and doing work we could do the the day before.

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They have REALLY good iced coffee…I was a bit shocked when I first tried it.

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My family gets donuts from Tim Hortons for everyone every Sunday. No, it’s not a sin, mortal or venial.

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People that work at restraunts in the US need money to live. The majority if them aren’t Catholic and want to earn a living. Using our faith to boycott things on sunday does more harm than good.

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What does the Catechism say about it? Have you read it?

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Keeping Sunday Holy is first and foremost about attending Mass and taking part in glorifying and giving praise to God through words and songs. And about receiving the sacrament.
I see nothing wrong with eating out on Sundays and/or attending a movie.
We should only do what work is absolutely necessary, unless it is part of our job to work on Sundays.

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Ridiculous. Maybe she is a nun because she chooses to deny herself in ways we aren’t required to. Check official Church teaching. Not a requirement.

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I like to remind Catholics that our day of rest usually comes at the expense of someone else’s labor. Would you rather go home and have brunch? If so, who will be cooking? Setting and clearing the table? Washing the dishes?

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I’ve always been told find anything that causes someone else to have to work on Sunday can be considered a sin. Like taking the family on a picnic is ok but going to a restaurant or shopping wouldn’t be ok unless maybe an emergency or something.

It is the custom in the United States for most restaurants to be open on Sundays. (Chick-fil-a would be a notable exception.) If you eat, somebody’s got to do the work of preparing the food, whether it’s you or someone at a restaurant. Eating at a restaurant actually helps the family to keep the Lord’s Day holy, by freeing them from having to cook.

Orthodox Jews prepare all of their food beforehands, so as not to have to cook or prepare food on Shabbos. They even use ways to keep food warm, placing it in or on heating units that have been turned on prior to Shabbos, so as not to have to “light a fire” which is forbidden on Shabbos. I have also noticed that some evangelical Christians do their cooking on Saturday night, apparently to free themselves up for a day of worship on Sunday, and to make food preparation on Sundays minimal.

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Yes

There’s been tons of threads asking if it was okay to do the following on Sunday

Exercise
Laundry
Study
Shopping
Online shopping
Eating out
Watching movies
Gardening
Playing video games
Grocery shopping

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Having spent my entire adult life working in the hotel and restaurant industry I can assure you that the people who work the Sunday shift rely on it tremendously for their income. The girls who work as servers in our dining room make as much in tips on Sunday as the rest of the week combined. In many cases, this is what supports an entire family. Patronizing restaurants can, in this sense, be viewed as a kindness to those who need the work.

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True

Using electricity or turning on the faucet or shower causes utility workers to work on Sundays.

Is it also sin to take a shower or turn on the lights on a Sunday?

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