Sunday morning mass versus other times

Is there anything that would make it preferrable to go to mass at the traditional time on Sunday morning if you could go at any one?
Particularly: Is it ok to go on Saturday evening and/or Sunday afternoon instead becuase you want to sleep longer and rest on Sunday morning?

Kathrin

Nope.

As far as the Church is concerned, your Sunday obligation is equally fulfilled by Mass on Saturday evening, Sunday morning, Sunday afternoon or Sunday evening.

Neither Canon Law nor any other official Church document makes any statement to the effect that Sunday morning is 'better' than these other times.

Kathrin, the Masses are all offered with the knowledge and permission of the Bishop, and therefore, with trust in the Holy Spirit, feel free to go to any of the Masses thus allowed by God for fulfilment of the Mass obligation.

Be at peace, :)

There is no preference for Sunday morning versus Saturday evening (usually considered to be 4:00pm or later) or Sunday afternoon.

Sleeping in on Sundays can be a good thing.

Any Mass scheduled at your parish (or any neighboring parish) that is a Sunday Mass (ie Saturday evening through Sunday evening) is acceptable to fulfill your obligation. We all attend Mass when it is most convenient for our schedule--even if we select the 7am Sunday Mass.

We are supposed to go to mass on Sunday. I get that post sundown on Saturday can be considered Sunday (that is similar to the jewish idea of when the Sabbath starts.), but if saturday night after sundown is Sunday...isn't Sunday night after sundown Monday? Anyone know how the church addresses this?

[quote="Elsport1, post:6, topic:185024"]
We are supposed to go to mass on Sunday. I get that post sundown on Saturday can be considered Sunday (that is similar to the jewish idea of when the Sabbath starts.), but if saturday night after sundown is Sunday...isn't Sunday night after sundown Monday? Anyone know how the church addresses this?

[/quote]

The Catholic church in her wisdom has made it so we attend either Saturday evening masses, Sunday masses or Sunday evening masses..you can go to any and fulfill your Sunday obligation..I believe your first sentence is incorrect in the way that you mean it. If that were so then that would mean going to Saturday evening mass and not going to Sunday mass is a sin unless there were special circumstances that would make it impossible to attend Sunday mass. As far as I know that simply is not the case.

I personally prefer the Sunday Liturgy in the morning.

But there's a lot to be said about an evening Liturgy during the week, or for a major feast, when one can "truly lay aside all earthly care", and I rather like those, too.

I work most of the weekends - therefore the Saturday vigil is only one I can attend - most weekends.

[quote="Elsport1, post:6, topic:185024"]
We are supposed to go to mass on Sunday. I get that post sundown on Saturday can be considered Sunday (that is similar to the jewish idea of when the Sabbath starts.), but if saturday night after sundown is Sunday...isn't Sunday night after sundown Monday? Anyone know how the church addresses this?

[/quote]

For every other day of the wek this is true. But because Sunday is such an important day, it is longer than every other day of the week according to the church calendar. It goes from sundown on Saturday to midnight on Sunday.

I perfer going Sunday morning because Saturday evening feels too casual and contemporary for me. I’m not a big fan of the guitar. I’d rather hear organ alone.

Um, but it doesn’t matter whether you go Saturday evening, Sunday morning, Sunday afternoon, or Sunday evening. It just matters if you go.

[quote="Mrs_Sally, post:10, topic:185024"]
For every other day of the wek this is true. But because Sunday is such an important day, it is longer than every other day of the week according to the church calendar. It goes from sundown on Saturday to midnight on Sunday.

[/quote]

Same goes for other important feasts - Ascension, Assumption, Triumph of the Cross and whatnot. Liturgy of the Hours will have prayers and readings relevant to the feast on the preceding evening as well as the entirety of the feast day itself.

With the feasts that are Holy Days of Obligation in particular, many parishes will put on an anticipated Mass (which is different to a true Vigil) the evening prior for those who can't go to Mass on the day for work or whatever other reason.

There is still something to be said for actually going to Mass on Sunday. Even before the "anticipated Mass" (Saturday evening), Sunday still began with First Vespers of Sunday (prayed on Saturday evening)... the "long" Sunday was not a post-Vatican II invention, to the best of my knowledge.

In his 1998 Apostolic Letter Dies Domini ("The Lord's Day"), Pope John Paul II wrote:

  1. Until quite recently, it was easier in traditionally Christian countries to keep Sunday holy because it was an almost universal practice and because, even in the organization of civil society, Sunday rest was considered a fixed part of the work schedule. Today, however, even in those countries which give legal sanction to the festive character of Sunday, changes in socioeconomic conditions have often led to profound modifications of social behaviour and hence of the character of Sunday. The custom of the "weekend" has become more widespread, a weekly period of respite, spent perhaps far from home and often involving participation in cultural, political or sporting activities which are usually held on free days. This social and cultural phenomenon is by no means without its positive aspects if, while respecting true values, it can contribute to people's development and to the advancement of the life of society as a whole. All of this responds not only to the need for rest, but also to the need for celebration which is inherent in our humanity. Unfortunately, when Sunday loses its fundamental meaning and becomes merely part of a "weekend", it can happen that people stay locked within a horizon so limited that they can no longer see "the heavens". Hence, though ready to celebrate, they are really incapable of doing so.

The disciples of Christ, however, are asked to avoid any confusion between the celebration of Sunday, which should truly be a way of keeping the Lord's Day holy, and the "weekend", understood as a time of simple rest and relaxation. This will require a genuine spiritual maturity, which will enable Christians to "be what they are", in full accordance with the gift of faith, always ready to give an account of the hope which is in them (cf. 1 Pt 3:15). In this way, they will be led to a deeper understanding of Sunday, with the result that, even in difficult situations, they will be able to live it in complete docility to the Holy Spirit.

...]

  1. Because the faithful are obliged to attend Mass unless there is a grave impediment, Pastors have the corresponding duty to offer to everyone the real possibility of fulfilling the precept. The provisions of Church law move in this direction, as for example in the faculty granted to priests, with the prior authorization of the diocesan Bishop, to celebrate more than one Mass on Sundays and holy days,(85) the institution of evening Masses(86) and the provision which allows the obligation to be fulfilled from Saturday evening onwards, starting at the time of First Vespers of Sunday.(87) From a liturgical point of view, in fact, holy days begin with First Vespers.(88) Consequently, the liturgy of what is sometimes called the "Vigil Mass" is in effect the "festive" Mass of Sunday, at which the celebrant is required to preach the homily and recite the Prayer of the Faithful.

(85) Cf. Code of Canon Law, Canon 905, 2.

(86) Cf. Pius XII, Apostolic Constitution Christus Dominus (6 January 1953): AAS 45 (1953), 15-24; Motu Proprio Sacram Communionem (19 March 1957): AAS 49 (1957), 177-178. Congregation of the Holy Office, Instruction on the Discipline concerning the Eucharist Fast (6 January 1953): AAS 45 (1953), 47-51.

(87) Cf. Code of Canon Law, Canon 1248, 1; Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches, Canon 881, 2.

(88) Cf. Missale Romanum, Normae Universales de Anno Liturgico et de Calendario, 3.

Well, I went to mass last night (Saturday, at 6pm) and I also went today at 12pm.
I often go Satruday and Sunday; I often go on Saturday night instead of going to another daily mass for Saturday.
:slight_smile:

[quote="Kathrin, post:14, topic:185024"]
Well, I went to mass last night (Saturday, at 6pm) and I also went today at 12pm.
I often go Satruday and Sunday; I often go on Saturday night instead of going to another daily mass for Saturday.
:)

[/quote]

Is it ok to receive the Host on Saturday evening and Sunday?

Yep. Per Canon Law you can receive twice in any 24-hour period as long as the second time is at a Mass rather than a Communion Service or anything.

If you are in danger of death you can receive more often than this too.

Yes. We can receive the Eucharist up to twice in any given 24 hour period, as long as the second time is at Mass - even if the readings are the same both times. :slight_smile:

I am curious - where did you get that about the 24 hour period? I thought it was just 2 ties in a day, from midnight to midnight.

But if Sunday is longer, maybe Saturday night already counts for the Sunday in this respect too? I have thought about this before.

Kathrin

[quote="Justin_Mee, post:15, topic:185024"]
Is it ok to receive the Host on Saturday evening and Sunday?

[/quote]

The Code of Canon Law (#917) stipulates, “A person who has received the Most Holy Eucharist may receive it again on the same day only during the celebration of the Eucharist in which the person participates, with due regard for the prescription of Canon 921, §2.” Following this lead, Canon 921, §2 stipulates, “Even if they have received Communion in the same day, those who are in danger of death are strongly urged to receive again.” Succinctly, a person may receive Holy Communion twice a day. This regulation was affirmed recently in Redemptionis Sacramentum (On Certain Matters to be Observed or to be Avoided Regarding the Most Holy Eucharist, March 25, 2004, #95).

cicdc.org/articles/saunder_communion.htm

[quote="Kathrin, post:18, topic:185024"]
I am curious - where did you get that about the 24 hour period? I thought it was just 2 ties in a day, from midnight to midnight.

[/quote]

You are correct. LilyM and jmcrae gave a concise summary of the rule, in a way that clarified that under canon law, it's the 24-hour day that matters, not the sometimes variable liturgical day. Unfortunately, when one summarizes, smaller details often get left out.

Sunday is a new day (starting at midnight) under canon law, even though liturgically it starts the previous evening.

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