Sunday rest for non-Catholics

Does the Church require non-Catholic Christians rest on Sundays like Catholics? Or is that obligation only for Catholics (which is what I would assume)?

The Old Testament Ten Commandments still apply to Christians. The Commandment to “keep holy the Sabbath Day”, transferred to the Sunday by the Early Church, applies to all Christians.

I am not sure what you mean by “Does the Church require” this of non-Catholics?

My question would be not so much does it, but “how could it”? Protestants and Orthodox do not recognise the authority of the Catholic Church, and the Church knows that.

In most cases, Canon Law does not bind non-Catholics.

As mentioned above, Sunday as a day of rest is a matter of divine law. While all are bound to follow this, it is a matter for each non-Catholic to ensure obedience on his own part.

re: “The Commandment to ‘keep holy the Sabbath Day’, transferred to the Sunday by the Early Church, applies to all Christians.”

But most non-catholics don’t recognize the catholic church’s assertion that it has the authority to change the commandments.

God Himself transferred the Sabbath to Sunday and made it the Day of the Lord.

The early Church did not change any commandment, but merely recognized what God had done.

The Church does not “require” non-Catholics to observe the Lord’s Day. Instead, the Church teaches that is is God’s command. As Divine Law, everyone is bound to obey it—to the degree that each one is aware of the Divine command.

FrDavid96,
re: “God Himself transferred the Sabbath to Sunday and made it the Day of the Lord. The early Church did not change any commandment, but merely recognized what God had done.”

Perhaps; but as you know, scripture is totally silent with regard to any change.

So, speaking hypothetically here, if I were to make someone who is non-Catholic work on Sunday or a HDoO, I would be responsible for someone violating a command of God?

No. Not true. There are those who choose to ignore the scriptural basis for Sunday as the Lord’s day. Ignoring scripture is not the same thing as the scripture being silent.

Possibly yes.

If you break your arm and “make” the medical staff care for you, you would not be doing anything wrong. If you “make” the fire department come to your house to extinguish your kitchen fire, you would not be doing anything wrong.

If you say “all the other widget stores in town are closed on Sunday and I can make a killing by being open” then (I would say) yes, you would be responsible for making someone violate a commandment.

Those are the 2 extremes. There is plenty in the middle.

It all depends.

FrDavid96,
re: “No. Not true. There are those who choose to ignore the scriptural basis for Sunday as the Lord’s day.”

I’m not aware of any scripture that has the Sabbath being “transferred” to the first day of the week. Nor do I know of any scripture that refers to the first day of the week as the “Lord’s day”. What do you have in mind?

On the first day of the week, Mary of Magdala came to the tomb early in the morning, while it was still dark, and saw the stone removed from the tomb.

Jesus rose from the dead on the first day of the week.

The earliest Christians recognized this as the day to “break bread”. See Acts 20:7.

Also see John 20:19

-Tim-

FrDavid96,
re: “On the first day of the week, Mary of Magdala came to the tomb early in the morning, while it was still dark, and saw the stone removed from the tomb.”

Since you quoted my last post, I assume that you mean the above to be a response to my comment that I’m not aware of any scripture that has the Sabbath being “transferred” to the first day of the week, as well as to my comment that I do not know of any scripture that refers to the first day of the week as the “Lord’s day”. However, I don’t see where John 20:1 says anything about transferring the Sabbath commandment to the first day of the week, or calling the first day of the week the Lord’s day. I wonder if you might explain why you think that they do?

TimothyH,

re: “The earliest Christians recognized this [the first day of the week] as the day to ‘break bread’. See Acts 20:7.”

Firstly, I don’t see where Acts 20:7 transfers the Sabbath commandment from the seventh day to the first day of the week. Also, I don’t see where the verse refers to the first day of the week as the Lord’s day.

And secondly, the breaking of bread mentioned - even if it is referring to the Lord’s Supper as opposed to a common meal - has nothing to do with placing a special emphasis on the first day of the week because Acts 2:46 says that they broke bread every day.

re: “Also see John 20:19”

The verse has the disciples together behind closed doors because they were hiding for fear of the Jews. They were afraid because the Messiah had just been killed and they most likely thought they could be next.

And it couldn’t have been for celebrating the resurrection because at that point they didn’t yet believe that the Messiah had resurrected.

Actually, as far as scripture is concerned, there are only two times mentioned with regard to anybody getting together on the first (day) of the week - the John 20:19 and Acts 20:7 passages. There is never any mention of anyone ever again being together on the first.

It’s my understanding that the early church transferred the “Sabbath” from Saturday to Sunday for a couple of reasons.

One was that Sunday was the day the Lord rose from the dead.

But the other was that when the Romans sacked Jerusalem circa AD70, the early Christians didn’t want to be seen as just another Jewish sect, with all the opprobrium that would attract… They had enough problems on their plate as it was without adding that to their worries, and were becoming more and more Gentile, whereas the earliest Christians had been Jewish to a man (and woman). As Gentiles they did not think that they had to retain what was really a Jewish custom. You might say they distanced themselves from traditional Judaism as a political move.

So there was a move for the day of worship from Saturday to Sunday. What you might call a change of tradition.

I’m not aware of God declaring it anywhere, nor is it in Scripture, but it was a tradition of the very early church, brought in for their own good reasons.

And for the sake of any SDA’s who might be browsing the forum, this took place centuries before Constantine.

Whether or not you want to be aware of any scripture that explicitly says it, the fact is that God did it. From the earliest days of Christianity, Christians have understood that Sunday is the Lord’s day–because on Sunday, He rose from the dead.

Fr. David, can you account for what seems (based on so many questions posted here) to be a growing “traditional” Catholic understanding of “Sunday rest” that seems closer to Orthodox Judaism than traditional Catholic practice? I refer to questions relating to doing homework on a Sunday (always a popular question), shoveling out your driveway after a snowstorm, working in one’s garden as a hobby/relaxation, even going for a family drive on a Sunday. All of these, and more, have been recent posts in terms of “Is it a sin” or “Is it allowed.”

It almost seems that in some quarters the sense is emerging that any physical activity - thus my comparison with Orthodox Judaism - violates “Sabbath rest.” What’s going on in the Church that we’re seeing so much of this? Back in the dim, distant 50’s when Church attendance and family structure were both stronger, there never was any question about - or preaching condemning - family outings or driving or even homework. Really curious.

Is it willful ignorance to read Romans 14 and then continue to argue over which days are the most special?

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