Sunday Work

I’ve been offered a job as a forensics coach, which is a great opportunity to help college students hone their skills in speech and debate. However, as a coach, I obviously am required to attend tournaments, which usually take place all day Saturday and Sunday. (To be fair, they don’t happen every weekend.)

I know I can still make it to Mass, but even so, I’d still be working all day on Sunday. It’s also worth mentioning that, as a coach, I’d be working as a judge during tournaments as well for other debate rounds and speech events.

It’s a great job, really. I’m just not sure whether it’d be a sin to commit myself in such a way.

There were times when I worked Sundays due to being in the railroad industry. As long as you can get to mass, I don’t think it is sin.

I advise that you talk to your priest about this.

CCC 901…For all their works, prayers, and apostolic undertakings, family and married life, daily work, relaxation of mind and body, if they are accomplished in the Spirit - indeed even the hardships of life if patiently born - all these become spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ.

You sanctify your work through prayer to fulfill the fourth precept of the Church.

Speech and debate, and other academic and artistic pursuits, are not forbidden on Sunday.

vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p3s2c1a3.htm

*'A day of grace and rest from work

2184 Just as God "rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had done,"121 human life has a rhythm of work and rest. The institution of the Lord’s Day helps everyone enjoy adequate rest and leisure to cultivate their familial, cultural, social, and religious lives.122

2185 On Sundays and other holy days of obligation, the faithful are to refrain from engaging in work or activities that hinder the worship owed to God, the joy proper to the Lord’s Day, the performance of the works of mercy, and the appropriate relaxation of mind and body.123 Family needs or important social service can legitimately excuse from the obligation of Sunday rest. The faithful should see to it that legitimate excuses do not lead to habits prejudicial to religion, family life, and health.

The charity of truth seeks holy leisure- the necessity of charity accepts just work.124
2186 Those Christians who have leisure should be mindful of their brethren who have the same needs and the same rights, yet cannot rest from work because of poverty and misery. Sunday is traditionally consecrated by Christian piety to good works and humble service of the sick, the infirm, and the elderly. Christians will also sanctify Sunday by devoting time and care to their families and relatives, often difficult to do on other days of the week. Sunday is a time for reflection, silence, cultivation of the mind, and meditation which furthers the growth of the Christian interior life.

2187 Sanctifying Sundays and holy days requires a common effort. Every Christian should avoid making unnecessary demands on others that would hinder them from observing the Lord’s Day. Traditional activities (sport, restaurants, etc.), and social necessities (public services, etc.), require some people to work on Sundays, but everyone should still take care to set aside sufficient time for leisure. With temperance and charity the faithful will see to it that they avoid the excesses and violence sometimes associated with popular leisure activities. In spite of economic constraints, public authorities should ensure citizens a time intended for rest and divine worship. Employers have a similar obligation toward their employees.

2188 In respecting religious liberty and the common good of all, Christians should seek recognition of Sundays and the Church’s holy days as legal holidays. They have to give everyone a public example of prayer, respect, and joy and defend their traditions as a precious contribution to the spiritual life of society. If a country’s legislation or other reasons require work on Sunday, the day should nevertheless be lived as the day of our deliverance which lets us share in this “festal gathering,” this "assembly of the firstborn who are enrolled in heaven."125’*

This is for you to pray and think about, and as another poster said, you could possibly ask a holy priest, for their advice.

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