Supreme Court says police must get warrants for most cellphone searches


#1

Washington Post:

Supreme Court says police must get warrants for most cellphone searches

The Supreme Court unequivocally ruled Wednesday that privacy rights are not sacrificed to 21st- century technology, saying unanimously that police generally must obtain a warrant before searching the cellphone of someone they arrest.

While the specific protection may not affect the average American, the court made a bold statement that the same concern about government prying that animated the nation’s birth applies to the abundance of digital information about an individual in the modern world.

Modern cellphones “hold for many Americans the privacies of life,” Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote for a court united behind the opinion’s expansive language. “The fact that technology now allows an individual to carry such information in his hand does not make the information any less worthy of the protection for which the Founders fought.”

Roberts said that in most cases when police seize a cellphone from a suspect, the answer is simple: “Get a warrant.”

:thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:


#2

:thumbsup:


#3

And I will add my own :thumbsup:


#4

:thumbsup:


#5

I would sacrifice my right to this type of privacy for a safer society. :frowning: I would also favor tracking devices on all vehicles.

LOVE! :heart:


#6

Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety - Benjamin Franklin


#7

I wouldn’t on either count…and I’m dull as paint.


#8

What is liberty when living in exile here in this miserable and corrupt world? Religious liberty is all that counts. We are taught to value liberty with all our might, but we turn our heads to all the seemingly needless pain and suffering, such as that brought about by extreme poverty. Everybody wants to fight for and exercise their rights, but relatively few want to develop their responsibilities, such as our loving and caring about one another.

LOVE! :heart:


#9

Do you think that a government that doesn’t care about liberty in general would respect religious liberty?


#10

It must have been a departmental issue. Most places I know already required a warrant to search any electronic storage device.


#11

Amen brother.


#12

As a former painter, I testify that you must be really dull.:wink: The years I spent painting houses with my father convinced me to stay in school so I could do something else for a living.

As long as warrants are granted on a reasonable basis, I don’t see this as a problem. Cops have a tough job and need oversight from courts to keep us both safe and free.


#13

Perhaps not, especially considering recent history, but religious liberties are what concern me the most. Less liberty to promote law enforcement, I’m OK with.

LOVE! :heart:


#14

So your solution to people protecting rights and shirking responsibilities it to shirk the rights too, rather than reemphasize the need for being responsible stewards? Why not do both, instead of neither, which is what you are suggesting? That makes no sense.


#15

In today’s society, it seems to me that ‘unnecessary’ liberties often conflicts with our better upholding justice. Having both would be ideal, but I’m afraid, is unrealistic.

LOVE! :heart:


#16

There are no such things as “unnecessary” liberties. We are America. Our country isn’t governed the same way as the Catholic Church.


#17

You are in the minority on this issue, for which I thank God very much.


#18

This is great news! I am surprised that they were ever allowed to search cell phones without a warrant to be honest.


#19

Well, that makes one of us. It’s a good thing the founding fathers didn’t feel that way.


#20

If the price of these liberties is that few crimes and acts of terror go unpunished then so be it. Considering that violent crime is down (compared to 80s & 90s) I feel we are on the verge of over policing. The obsession with safety and security went to far for well over a 2 decades now.


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