Surplus hosts after Mass?

This topic may have come up before, if so I apologize.

The question came up about the surplus hosts consecrated at a Mass. What is the standard practice for their disposition?

The reason I ask is that most Masses I have attended, there is a large population in attendance (these places are big) and with multiple serving positions in the sanctuary I would imagine that there would be some sort of extra number of hosts to gather at the conclusion of the Eucharist.

Are these to be eaten right away by the clergy? Similarly, I am curious about the wine.

What does canon law specify as to the care of the Sacred Species? Does this differ in practice from diocese to diocese?

Thanks in advance.

Michael,

In our Parish the 'left over " /surplus Hosts are reserved in the Tabernacle until the next Mass. Eventually there does come a time when , if you would excuse the term , a clear out is done - ie unless absolutely necessary , none are Consecrated other than the Large Priest’s Host in my RC Parish about 6ins in diameter ]. BUT in our defence we serve a very large Hospital and EHMCs take Communion in there every day - so we do need to have a sufficient number available in the Tabernacle.

Today with 3 Masses in the Parish Church we were a bit short for the first Mass - someone forgot , I think/hope , that as the local School was coming there would be more people there than usual so that, as a result , our Deacon Seminarian on holiday ] was reduced to fractioning Hosts otherwise he would have been in the most uncomfortable position of refusing Communion to quite a few folk. I believe the Priest was in the same predicament…

The Eucharist is reserved in the tabernacle. The remaining Precious Blood is to be consumed immediately.

[quote=Lurch104]The Eucharist is reserved in the tabernacle. The remaining Precious Blood is to be consumed immediately.
[/quote]

I read once, and I can’t seem to rememeber where, that in at least one of the Eastern Catholic Churches (Maronite? - not sure) the Precious Blood is kept in the tabernacle in order to administer first communion to infants following their Baptism and Confirmation/Chrismation.

James

Thanks for the responses, I was wondering about all that.

[quote=James0235]I read once, and I can’t seem to rememeber where, that in at least one of the Eastern Catholic Churches (Maronite? - not sure) the Precious Blood is kept in the tabernacle in order to administer first communion to infants following their Baptism and Confirmation/Chrismation.

James
[/quote]

Possible, I believe the Maronites use a host in the same fashion as the Western church, if they have continued to commune infants that may be how.

I do know that in the Byzantine tradition the Body is consecrated from leavened bread and the “lamb” is immersed in the chalice with the blood. This never seems to be a problem for infants, it is quite soft and wet.

Reserved or surplus hosts must always be kept into the tabernacle to allow for a priest, deacon or Minister of care to be able to bring the Holy Eucharist to those who are sick, homebound or dying. Viaticum or Holy Communion to the dying is vital and it must always be available, not wait until a mass is said to provide newly consecrated hosts.

Thanks to all of you for the excellent answers. Yes, extra Hosts are to be placed in the Tabernacle for use later.

[quote=wannabee]Michael,

In our Parish the 'left over " /surplus Hosts are reserved in the Tabernacle until the next Mass. Eventually there does come a time when , if you would excuse the term , a clear out is done - ie unless absolutely necessary , none are Consecrated other than the Large Priest’s Host in my RC Parish about 6ins in diameter ]. BUT in our defence we serve a very large Hospital and EHMCs take Communion in there every day - so we do need to have a sufficient number available in the Tabernacle.

Today with 3 Masses in the Parish Church we were a bit short for the first Mass - someone forgot , I think/hope , that as the local School was coming there would be more people there than usual so that, as a result , our Deacon Seminarian on holiday ] was reduced to fractioning Hosts otherwise he would have been in the most uncomfortable position of refusing Communion to quite a few folk. I believe the Priest was in the same predicament…
[/quote]

There should be very few Hosts in the tabernacle. The Blessed Sacrament taken to the sick at the hospital should be Consecrated at Mass that morning if possible.

Left over Consecrated Hosts must be kept in the Tabernacle for the next mass and it is reserved for the sick Catholics or for emergency purpose.

Consecrated Wine must be consumed.

Left over Consecrated Hosts must be kept in the Tabernacle for the next mass and it is reserved for the sick Catholics or for emergency purpose.

Consecrated Wine must be consumed.

If the Consecrated Hosts is not anymore suitable to be eaten then it is dissolved by the priest in the water until no particles will be seen. and it is disposed in a place in a church. i dont know what it is called.

[quote=viktor aleksndr]Left over Consecrated Hosts must be kept in the Tabernacle for the next mass and it is reserved for the sick Catholics or for emergency purpose.

Consecrated Wine must be consumed.

If the Consecrated Hosts is not anymore suitable to be eaten then it is dissolved by the priest in the water until no particles will be seen. and it is disposed in a place in a church. i dont know what it is called.
[/quote]

I believe it’s a special drain that drains directly into the earth… Sorry, can’t think of the name currently

My spelling may be off, but it is called a sacrorium.

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