Surprised?, not really!

Hello everyone, and a Happy Easter to you all.
This morning (sunday) I was watching T.V. when on came an Anglican eucharist service from Southwark Cathedral in London. I thought it might be an eye opener to watch what they do, during their communion one man walked up to the minister, took a “Host” and moved along and dipped it in the wine!!!. No minister batted an eyelid, nor did anyone else, I nearly fell off my sofa, indeed I found myself shouting at the screen saying "what the H**L is he doing?. Anglicans, is this normal practise in your church?, :confused:, any replies from anyone on this matter greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance to all who may answer,
God Bless,
Mick.:thumbsup:

I cannot speak for the Church of England, but in my time as an Episcopalian 40 years ago, intinction was seldom, if ever, done.

“Took a Host” as in “reached into the ciborium and removed one”? Or was given it and then walked over to the chalice and dipped it in?

I’m sorry to tell you that you’ll see that happen (though less and less frequently) in Catholic Churches all over North America. It’s forbidden, but a decade or so of priests allowing it has made it a difficult thing to stop. We keep having to write about it in the Parish bulletin to get the message across.

Hi Phemie,
he actually reached in and took one from the ciborium, and then walked along, dipped, and consumed it.:eek:
Mick.:thumbsup:

Must have trained with our former pastor who passed the ciborium around like a candy dish to all the EMHCs and altar servers.

I’d be a bit upset if it happened in the USA. But I have to wonder, is it OK there? Or is it faux pas in the whole Roman Rite?

It’s forbidden to TAKE Communion in that way, we are to RECEIVE Communion. Dipping (properly ‘intinction’) the Host one was given is also forbidden, for the same reason.

Of course, being given Communion via a Host that the priest has dipped in the Precious Blood and placed on your tongue is a perfectly valid method of receiving.

Hi I think most of the previous posters missed that the op was referring to and asking Angelicans. Also, I believe that I read somewhere else in the forums that this normal practice for Anglicans.

Alright, what’s so shocking about that?

Since it’s an Anglican service, they’re just snacking on ordinary bread and wine.

From my days in the Anglican Church (which ended not so long ago) it is permitted to recieve a host in your hand, and this would be placed there by a priest, then when the minister/priest offers the chalice of wine to dip (self-intinct) instead of taking a sip from the chalice. In my days of offering the chalice, I noticed that there were some who did this when they had cold infections, to avoid spreading their germs via the chalice. Please bear in mind that it is not the norm only to recieve under one species in the Anglican church, although there are those who will indicate that they are unable to partake of the wine.
I would have been horrified at someone simply walking up and helping themself from the ciborium and so would all of the priests with whom I worked. Totally disrespectful (and they don’t even have Vatican II to blame for disrespectful behaviour :wink: )

[edited]

Without going into the fact that Anglicans are not in communion with us and do not have valid sacraments, etc, [edited], please note that the Anglican church teaches and believes transsubstantiation just as we do. Therefore consecrated bread and wine are treated with the same respect as they are in the Catholic church, they are the body and blood of Christ. In fact the hosts used are the same as the ones the Catholic church uses. So that disrespectful behaviour is shocking in every respect.

POI - some Anglicans do so, but the 39 Articles were always understood as condemning it, until Newman upset the apple-cart in 1841. It is not an Anglican doctrine at all: the Articles call transsubstantiation “a blasphemous fable and a dangerous deceit”.

Therefore consecrated bread and wine are treated with the same respect as they are in the Catholic church, they are the body and blood of Christ. In fact the hosts used are the same as the ones the Catholic church uses. So that disrespectful behaviour is shocking in every respect.

Not if the doctrine is not the same as Rome’s; & it’s not. The Gifts can in some sense or another be the Body & Blood, without transsubstantiation being involved. It as sensible to judge Anglicans for their Eucharistic doctrine & practice by applying Roman standards, as to judge Presbyterian church polity by applying Roman standards - IOW, not very.

I am a convert from the Episcopal church and there many churches commonly did self- intinction.

It’s forbidden to TAKE Communion in that way, we are to RECEIVE Communion. Dipping (properly ‘intinction’) the Host one was given is also forbidden, for the same reason.<<

SELF-intinction is what is forbidden.

At the Easter Vigil, the Pope Himself gave Communion in both kind by intinction to the neophytes–though not, I noticed, to anyone else.

Hi Brigid, from another ex-Anglican/Epicopalian now-a-happy-Catholic. Self-intinction, as I said, I have seen and it is allowed in the Anglican church (although I have not seen it often), but someone just helping themself from the ciborium :eek: , surely you did not see that. I know none of the priests I worked with would have allowed that.

Dixibehr, Catholics know self-intinction is not allowed in the Catholic church, but the discussion here is about the Anglican church, where it is allowed, but must be done respectfully - what English Guy saw was not respectful.

As an ex-Anglican I would respectfully modify that to say some or many Anglicans see it that way. Definitely not all. That is one of the problems with Anglicanism; it doesn’t really matter.

:yup: At the last Episcopalian church I attended before my conversion there were three of us in one of the Sunday services that felt they had to kneel at the consecration (our knees demanded it!). One of those was someone who’d grown up in the Catholic Church in Canada and was quite elderly (and one of the holiest women I met in the Episcopal church). There probably were a few more in the other Sunday service or the Saturday vigil service. This Episcopalian pastor had been trained in the most conservative and traditional Episcopalian seminary in the US - Nashota House. I don’t know, but he could very easily have been ordained with an Orthodox or Old Catholic concelebrating. I never asked him but not too long after I converted to Catholicism I received a note from him just saying “I understand” and shortly thereafter saw a website about him being a pastor of a break-away group of Episcopalians in Tx :shrug:. Anyway, it is true in the Episcopalian churches as with the Catholic churches, that a conservative priest will draw like-minded parishioners.

Originally posted by** VivienneJ**
Hi Brigid, from another ex-Anglican/Epicopalian now-a-happy-Catholic. Self-intinction, as I said, I have seen and it is allowed in the Anglican church (although I have not seen it often), but someone just helping themself from the ciborium , surely you did not see that. I know none of the priests I worked with would have allowed that.

:nope: Never saw that at all (I’m glad to say) and the Episcopalian priest I worked with would not have allowed that, either.:wink:

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