Talking to a Priest About Confession


#1

I need to talk to my confessor about something he said in confession. It woild be preferable if this were to happen prior to me entering the confessional. Would it be permissible for me to ask him such a question? I don’t want to put him in a situation where the seal of confession could be broken. Since I was the pentient, should this be a concern? Also, how should I approach such a conversation? What if someone were to overhear? I’m not so worried about the content (it’s just about the advice I received), but I’m concerned about how he’ll feel about it.

Thanks


#2

Hello. :slight_smile: Since you are the penitent, in order for the seal of confession to be broken, you must give permission. By asking him about what he said in confession, you are giving your permission for the seal to be broken. :slight_smile:


#3

In all such cases, your best bet is to be direct. Don’t beat around the bush. When you meet with the priest, try not to be embarrassed. In all probability, he doesn’t remember your Confession and you will have to remind him as to what he told you. It is only then, that he will be able to explain what he meant.
G*d bless and I hope you get peace and tranquility from your meeting.


#4

Father Vincent Serpa answers this question.
catholic.com/quickquestions/can-i-give-a-priest-permission-to-talk-about-my-confession


#5

I would not call it “breaking the seal” but giving permission to discuss ones confessions. :slight_smile:


#6

Detailed information: catholiceducation.org/articles/religion/re0059.html


#7

Thanks for the replies

So when I approach my priest, should I say something like, “I need to ask you a question about some advice you gave me. So I release you from the seal of confession.” Or could I just ask him the question? I also want to point out that my only opportunity to talk to him will be tonight, after a class he leads. I plan on waiting until everyone leaves, but I know that some parish leaders will stay to help clean up. I’d be vague (specific enough for him to understand), so they won’t know what I’m referring to. Would this be an inappropriate time? If it is, my only chance would be within the confessional. In this case could I request to ask something before the sacrament starts? I could try to talk to him before he enters the confessional though.


#8

“You may refer to my confessions”


#9

You have to judge as to the “place and time”. You of course would not want anyone around…

Father I have a question about a confession – “You may refer to my confessions”.

And one can (often best) discuss with him in the Sacrament of Confession ones questions.


#10

“Father, I have a question about something we talked about in the confessional. I would like to talk about it with you now. Is that alright? I had confessed [stealing/masturbating/gossping] and you said I should [receive communion tomorrow/make reparation/say a certain prayer]. What did you mean by that?”


#11

“Father, I have a question about something we talked about in the confessional. I would like to talk about it with you now. Is that alright? I had confessed [stealing/masturbating/gossping] and you said I should [receive communion tomorrow/make reparation/say a certain prayer]. What did you mean by that?”


#12

Yes, I guess that would be a more appropriate term. :slight_smile:


#13

Father Serpa says that the penitent cannot give permission for the seal to be broken to discuss with others. But Father William Saunders says otherwise. The link is below.

Who is right? :shrug:

catholiceducation.org/articles/religion/re0059.html


#14

The one Priest was emphasising that one is not to have the Priest break the seal and go use his confession in a homily . Sometimes the quick answers are well quick and not intended to cover all aspects of questions (such as what is meant by “break the seal” etc)

Fr. Saunders goes into detail on what is involved which fits more the persons question here.


#15

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