Teen working for California-based pizza chain says she was fired after asking for equal wage


#1

sfgate.com/news/article/Teen-working-for-Calif-based-pizza-chain-says-she-8323849.php


#2

Well, the key word was said. It might not be good to disbelieve the girl, but we don’t have any objective evidence. Or, at least, none was provided here that I’ve seen.


#3

I believe she was fired because there was a violation of company policy about sharing wage information with other employees.

Also, the gender wage gap described in this article is a myth. Women are “paid less” per dollar because they take less risky, less-paying jobs.


#4

That makes sense, then.


#5

A brave girl to lose a job over .25c an hour. I hope she wins any interminable wage case she initiates in the future. I hope she realises that employers read the papers and are often loath to employ “trouble makers”. Such discernment on their part is, of course, reprehensible, however is not unheard of in a cruel employment environment. I have found in the course of a long career in industrial law, that some wars are worth fighting; others are not. She will have to decide. Remember the golden rule: Whoever makes the gold, makes the rules.


#6

It could also signal that she is proactive. Which is a positive trait. Also, the business could lose customers over this. I certainly would not patronize a place that fired someone over such a petty thing.


#7

I think the company could have saved itself bad publicity and made some good PR, had the reply simply been, “Oh, yes, of course. You’ll be making $8.25 per hour.” (Which is a pretty good starting wage in that area and type of business.)


#8

=stinkcat_14;13997380]It could also signal that she is proactive.

So are pro-choicers.

Which is a positive trait. Also, the business could lose customers over this. I certainly would not patronize a place that fired someone over such a petty thing.

That’s up to each person, but the article makes it clear she was fired for violating company policy.


#9

A policy that appears to go against the National Labor Relations Board policies.
I went from working in a government-run hospital, where every nurse’s salary was the same based on her level of education, years of experience, and position on the ward, to working in a bank where I was specifically warned not to discuss my salary with anyone.

Confused by this I asked my manager what that was all about. Her reply, “See Carol over there? She’s been here six years. You were hired yesterday, without any banking or clerical experience, and you’re making more than she is. If she knew what you are making it would be worth her while to quit and go work somewhere else for a while then reapply for another job.”

Along with the warning against discussing wages came the warning against trying to unionize the workplace. “If there is a suspicion that you are engaged in union activity you will be fired. They will find a reason, if they have to make one up.”


#10

I am not sure what your point is? A worker being proactive is a bad thing?

That’s up to each person, but the article makes it clear she was fired for violating company policy.

In my opinion, that is a stupid policy, that as the other poster suggests may well be illegal.

Actually, the manager who fired the teens was recently fired herself. So maybe the company now realizes they have a bad policy.

fox4kc.com/2016/06/24/manager-who-fired-teens-for-discussing-pay-let-go-at-legends-pizza-shop/


#11

It is certainly possible that the boy got 25 cents more an hour for a very benign reason. He could have had a better job already, or he could have been a better negotiator. Of course, negotiating can be risky as well. My wife once had a job offer rescinded when she asked for more money. On the other hand, once people find out someone else is making more for no apparent reason, it can be damaging to moral. Also to expect that teenage employees won’t talk about their wages seems extremely naive.


#12

Yes. :thumbsup:


#13

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