Telling Parent about wanting to convert


#1

I'm not sure whether this is the right forum, but here it goes I suppose.

Ive wanted to be Catholic since my now ex-boyfriend introduced me to it. Essentially he gave me the basic ideas, still answers my questions to this day, and I decided that Catholicism fitted my beliefs and wanted to go through with becoming Catholic. It really makes me happy, and I enjoyed Mass whenever me and him got to go.

Only thing is, I've yet to tell my parents. I'm going to Uni in 2 months, and Ideally I wanted to do it then, so I'm out of reach y'know...if they disagree or don't like the idea.

But Ive no idea what to say. My mother, well, she dislikes any form of Christianity as she was forced to go to church as a child and hated it. As a result, she couldn't care less what religion I became - as long as it wasn't christian.

My dad - he was brought up Catholic, enjoyed it, but never fully embraced it. So I don't think my issue would be with him.

Just wondering whether anybody who has converted recently or in the past could give me some advice on whats the best approach to this.

Thanks,
Poetpeace.


#2

Hi, it's wonderful that you are so comfortable and happy about converting and that you are hopeful of your Dad's response.
It's sad that your mother cannot deal with her past experience.
She is responsible for her choices but not for yours.
If she is strongly prejudiced than there probably isn't much you can do to make her happy about your choice,
but hopefully out of love for you, she will want for you what makes you happy.
Most of us parents have to face that our children will make some choices we would wish they didn't. Time and time again I've seen parents making adjustments because they love their children. It's very hard at first, but even parents have to keep growing.
I can only pray for you that things will go better than you fear.


#3

[quote="Poetpeace, post:1, topic:247387"]
I'm not sure whether this is the right forum, but here it goes I suppose.

Ive wanted to be Catholic since my now ex-boyfriend introduced me to it. Essentially he gave me the basic ideas, still answers my questions to this day, and I decided that Catholicism fitted my beliefs and wanted to go through with becoming Catholic. It really makes me happy, and I enjoyed Mass whenever me and him got to go.

Only thing is, I've yet to tell my parents. I'm going to Uni in 2 months, and Ideally I wanted to do it then, so I'm out of reach y'know...if they disagree or don't like the idea.

But Ive no idea what to say. My mother, well, she dislikes any form of Christianity as she was forced to go to church as a child and hated it. As a result, she couldn't care less what religion I became - as long as it wasn't christian.

My dad - he was brought up Catholic, enjoyed it, but never fully embraced it. So I don't think my issue would be with him.

Just wondering whether anybody who has converted recently or in the past could give me some advice on whats the best approach to this.

Thanks,
Poetpeace.

[/quote]

Hi.

If you're an adult, you have a free choice to join any faith you wish.

Christ warned his disciples that choosing His Way would cause division for some. Your mother's distaste for Christianity is her choice. This one is your own.

I would take the charitable but direct approach. Should your mother be angered, be sure to tell her that you'll write and call from college--keep the lines open, even if she makes ultimatums or threats about not speaking to you. I would not be confrontational or argue about the matter.

There may be others here who have thoughts on conversion and the problems they've had with their families. The Catholic Answers website and its store may also have more help. God bless.


#4

I would just be casual about it - tell them you've been going to church, and are thinking of taking the RCIA classes. Maybe tell your dad first. It might be worthwhile to ask him why he didn't keep up with his Catholic back-ground.

Your mom might not be crazy about it, but most parents realize their kids are their own people. If she brings up her experience, tell her that isn't yours, but that you respect her desire to keep you from harm.


#5

Ok, thanks for the wonderful advise guys :slight_smile:

I know why dad gave up Catholicism - it didn’t fit the teenage/college life he wanted, then again, if he had been Catholic I would have never been born. But he hasn’t entirely forgotten it, he isn’t for abortion, and does owe a lot of his moral beliefs about life, and about family to his upbringing.

I guess my mother makes me more nervous…But I am hoping her motherly love will mean she won’t attack me for my decision…


#6

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