Temptaion or sin?


#1

So basically my question is this: How do you know whether you just resisted a temptation or sinned?
In some cases its not really a question like whether you lied or not, but for example; a person is masturbating, right in the middle of it he stops himself. Did he sin for going as far as he did? Or did he resist a temptation by stopping? Does he have to go to confession on Sunday for masturbation, or can he give himself a pat on the back for a battle won?

Thanks


#2

I’d say both. Sinning is giving consent to the temptation instead of moving one’s thoughts along to something else. A person might give in to the temptation and then recollect himself and stop, in which case he has done a bit of a bad thing (confess) and then done a good thing (can be mentioned in Confession but not required).


#3

To disobey the ninth commandment is a mortal sin, without actually breaking the sixth commandment. The ninth is a prelude to the sixth. One sins from the moment of the decision to wilfully do the sin with forethought and knowledge.

This may be helpful, from the Baltimore Catechism No. 3 and the latest Catechism. Your description seems to fit the ninth commandment the best as “carnal concupiscence” regardless of the

Q. 1284. What is forbidden by the sixth Commandment?

A. The sixth Commandment forbids all unchaste freedom with another’s wife or husband; also all immodesty with ourselves or others in looks, dress, words, and actions.

Q. 1317. What is forbidden by the ninth Commandment?

A. The ninth Commandment forbids unchaste thoughts, desires of another’s wife or husband, and all other unlawful impure thoughts and desires.

Q. 1324. In what does the sixth commandment differ from the ninth, and the seventh differ from the tenth?

A. The sixth commandment differs from the ninth in this, that the sixth refers chiefly to external acts of impurity, while the ninth refers more to sins of thought against purity. The seventh commandment refers chiefly to external acts of dishonesty, while the tenth refers more to thoughts against honesty.

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church, on the ninth Commandment:

2514 St. John distinguishes three kinds of covetousness or concupiscence: lust of the flesh, lust of the eyes, and pride of life.301 In the Catholic catechetical tradition, the ninth commandment forbids carnal concupiscence; the tenth forbids coveting another’s goods.

2515 Etymologically, “concupiscence” can refer to any intense form of human desire. Christian theology has given it a particular meaning: the movement of the sensitive appetite contrary to the operation of the human reason. The apostle St. Paul identifies it with the rebellion of the “flesh” against the "spirit."302 Concupiscence stems from the disobedience of the first sin. It unsettles man’s moral faculties and, without being in itself an offense, inclines man to commit sins.303


#4

To disobey the ninth commandment is a mortal sin, without actually breaking the sixth commandment. The ninth is a prelude to the sixth. One sins from the moment of the decision to wilfully do the sin with forethought and knowledge.

This may be helpful, from the Baltimore Catechism No. 3 and the latest Catechism.

Q. 1284. What is forbidden by the sixth Commandment?

A. The sixth Commandment forbids all unchaste freedom with another’s wife or husband; also all immodesty with ourselves or others in looks, dress, words, and actions.

Q. 1317. What is forbidden by the ninth Commandment?

A. The ninth Commandment forbids unchaste thoughts, desires of another’s wife or husband, and all other unlawful impure thoughts and desires.

Q. 1324. In what does the sixth commandment differ from the ninth, and the seventh differ from the tenth?

A. The sixth commandment differs from the ninth in this, that the sixth refers chiefly to external acts of impurity, while the ninth refers more to sins of thought against purity. The seventh commandment refers chiefly to external acts of dishonesty, while the tenth refers more to thoughts against honesty.

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church, on the ninth Commandment:

2514 St. John distinguishes three kinds of covetousness or concupiscence: lust of the flesh, lust of the eyes, and pride of life.301 In the Catholic catechetical tradition, the ninth commandment forbids carnal concupiscence; the tenth forbids coveting another’s goods.

2515 Etymologically, “concupiscence” can refer to any intense form of human desire. Christian theology has given it a particular meaning: the movement of the sensitive appetite contrary to the operation of the human reason. The apostle St. Paul identifies it with the rebellion of the “flesh” against the "spirit."302 Concupiscence stems from the disobedience of the first sin. It unsettles man’s moral faculties and, without being in itself an offense, inclines man to commit sins.303


#5

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