ten commandments


#1

Quick question, i recently came across information about an ongoing debate about the sixth commandment, thou shall not kill,being misstranslated. Some scholars are saying the commandment should have been thou shall not murder. My older brother who is in his fourth year of studies for the diacanet got a little frustrated with me when i questioned him about this because i said that if it were true then it would change the way we view the commandment and in my opinion it to me would seem more reasonable. I dont profess to know the mind of God but to me if it were suppose to be murder versus kill it would be more logical. Kill to me condems anyone who has killed whether it was in self defense or war or unintentional versus something like rage or plotted,well you get the point. My brother got frustrated because he said the ecf had devine revalation and they were so much better than us today and we should trust the church in what she has revealed on this. I told him that i trust the church but the translations were done by man and a mistake could have been made. So i guess what i am asking is what do you guys think about this issue ? Thanks:D


#2

It doesn’t matter if it says murder or kill; it is the same commandment interpreted the same way.


#3

One more thing to add:

Thou shall kill is the Seventh Commandment not the Sixth.

God Bless.


#4

Actually it’s the fifth.


#5

Not really wanting to debate which number it is , but you see ithink it does matter how it is translated to me kill would condem everyone in histiory that killed a human being but murder does not. If you kill a human out of evil intent such as plotting it,or rage or whatever i hope you get the point , it is not the same as self defense or something of that nature another words you did not want to kill but had to. Kill paints with a briad brush, pretty much condeming everyone in history,murder condems an evil act.


#6

The translation kill or murder is not what we are bound to, but the interpretation given by the Church is. The Catechism explains it clearly and is worth read if you are unsure how its interpreted, starting with paragraph 2258. It is nearly pointless for Catholics to argue over the meaning of the words and their defintion in lexicons when we have the Catechism of the Catholic Church that goes into great depth.


#7

Very much appreciate your insite but i am really not trying to argue over word meanings. I was only wandering how my brothers and sisters in Christ view this issue. The only stupid questions are the ones not asked. I just believe that one word mistranslated can very much change the perception of what something means or how it is received.


#8

Very much appreciate your insite but i am really not trying to argue over word meanings. I was only wandering how my brothers and sisters in Christ view this issue. The only stupid questions are the ones not asked. I just believe that one word mistranslated can very much change the perception of what something means or how it is received.


#9

I take “thou shalt not kill” very literally. I am probably wrong…and there will be some who debate me…but I personally take it to mean not to kill anything.

So…the spider that scurries along my ceiling will be captured and set free…not smushed.

Thats just me though…:smiley:


#10

I wasnt meaning you arguing specifically, but I meant it in general terms. I see people on forums argue about the meaning of this or that Greek or Hebrew word, but it boils down to how it has already been interpreted. There are no words that are going to appear that is going to change an established doctrine. What I see is that people have come up with so many interpretations based upon an English translation, and then that same beast gets even much larger when people come up with many more interpretations when they start trying to reinvent the wheel with a Greek or Hebrew text and their lexicons.


#11

Thanks for links was great stuff helped a lot. I do agree things like this can get out of control.


#12

I heard that Thou shall not steal was actually to do with kidnapping (stealing women).

I don’t speak the old languages though so couldn’t say one way or another.


#13

Nope, it means don’t put your hands on something you ain’t going to buy. Stealing another mans women, or vise versa is adultry.


#14

Its the fifth and its You Shall NOT kill.


#15

I copied this from a website:

Hebraic Insight…

The Jewish sages note that the word “ratsakh” applies only to illegal killing (e.g., premeditated murder or manslaughter) — and is never used in the administration of justice or for killing in war. Hence the KJV translation as “thou shalt not kill” is too broad.

Since man is made in the image of God, his life is infinitely precious — only God Himself has the right to give and take life. In the Mishnah it is written, “Why was only one man (i.e., Adam) created by God? — to teach that whoever takes a single life destroys thereby a whole world.”

But murder can be figurative as well as literal. The Talmud notes that shaming another publicly is like murder, since the shame causes the blood to leave the face. Moreover, gossip or slander are considered murderous to the dignity of man. The Pirkei Avot (Ethics of the Fathers) states, “The evil tongue slays three persons: the utterer of the evil, the listener, and the one spoken about…” The Lord Jesus also linked the ideas of our words and attitudes with murder (see Matt. 15:19).

“Thou Shalt Not Kill”
— Ex. 20:


#16

[quote="TheFollower, post:3, topic:290347"]
One more thing to add:

Thou shall kill is the Seventh Commandment not the Sixth.

God Bless.

[/quote]

"Thou shall kill"? :eek: :p


#17

Firstly, who mentioned stealing another mans women?
Secondly, who said about having sex with her?

Significant voices among academic theologians (such as German Old Testament scholar Albrecht Alt: Das Verbot des Diebstahls im Dekalog (1953)) suggest that commandment “you shall not steal” was originally intended against stealing people—against abductions and slavery, in agreement with the Talmudic interpretation of the statement as “you shall not kidnap” (Sanhedrin 86a).

But like I said, I don’t speak the old languages.


#18

"thou shalt not murder" as the bible elsewhere clearly requires the death penalty for various sins.


#19

MEA CULPA!!!! :(:blush:

God Bless.


#20

I just thought I would include it because of all the junk going on in relationships today. :smiley:


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