Tennessee Passes New Immigration Law, Follows Arizona’s Footsteps

illegalaliennewsupdate.com/archives/8938

Tennessee Governor Phil Bredesen (D) signed a bill yesterday [June 28, 2010] that creates provisions similar to, but less harsh than, those of SB 1070, including requiring city and county jails in the state to report any person who may be in violation of immigration laws to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Interesting..... "less harsh than AB1070".

AB 1070 as worded is less harsh than the existing FEDERAL immigration law. I wonder if our federal government will sue Tennessee now.

All of these states passing similar immigration laws point glaringly at our federal government's complete lack of attention to an increasingly destructive policy of not enforcing our national borders.

I stand by the AZ bill and am glad to see Tennessee moving on this much needed legislation. SOMEONE must do SOMETHING!!!

Me too. I wonder if the Adminstration will try to sue them as well. And if another state does it?? are they prepared to turn against their own country? LOL...

[quote="catsrus, post:3, topic:203789"]
I stand by the AZ bill and am glad to see Tennessee moving on this much needed legislation. SOMEONE must do SOMETHING!!!

[/quote]

:thumbsup: Me too.

There are other states doing the same thing. Good for them.

And in retaliation, and to further aid their agenda, the federal government will pass a blanket amnesty. Where will that leave us except to bring many more thousands into the country?

"Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

[quote="iamrefreshed, post:7, topic:203789"]
"Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

[/quote]

Uh, yeah. But that was on the Statue of Liberty. Right next to Ellis Island. Where one could enter the country legally. They had immigration restrictions back then, as well.

These people are completely flaunting US immigration laws. They are criminals. And a lot of them are otherwise-criminals, as well. The drug cartels own Mexico (did you hear about the candidate for governor being shot?), and that is destined to spill over the border.

[quote="Charlotte408, post:4, topic:203789"]
Me too. I wonder if the Adminstration will try to sue them as well. And if another state does it?? are they prepared to turn against their own country? LOL...

[/quote]

Yes they are. An adminsitration that apolozies on behalf of Arizona to China of all places is very much an America second kind of administraton.

Good for Tennessee though. The inanity and ineptitude happening at the federal level may yet result in states reasserting their rights like hasn't been the case for some time.

[quote="CatholicGerman, post:8, topic:203789"]
Uh, yeah. But that was on the Statue of Liberty. Right next to Ellis Island. Where one could enter the country legally. They had immigration restrictions back then, as well.

[/quote]

You are responding to yet another typical response of the left who has been trained to decide from the heart rather than from the mind.

Reasoning did not play even the slightest role in the prose being quoted. I am sure his response was heartfelt, but the heart needs no reasons. As long as the heart is in the right place, for the typical leftist, that is all that matters.

The violent lawlessness, the exploitation of those 'poor and huddled masses', the great expense incurred by a society that is reeling from the expenses incurred by the massive illegal immigration, are of no concern to the heart that bleeds.

[quote="iamrefreshed, post:7, topic:203789"]
"Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

[/quote]

Thanks for the quote. Our country was essentially based on immigration.

One part of the solution to the immigration problem is to allow more immigration--much more--and make it faster process.

We are now a nation whose reproduction rate is verging on the brink of falling below the replacement level. Without immigration, we would start a depopulation spiral, as much of Europe is doing. We need more immigration, not less. And it should not take months--years!--to get approved to enter. At Ellis Island they processed thousands every day, and these were immigrants who did not apply ahead of time.

We do need to keep out criminals and drug dealers. We don't need to keep out everyone.

[quote="JimG, post:11, topic:203789"]
We are now a nation whose reproduction rate is verging on the brink of falling below the replacement level. Without immigration, we would start a depopulation spiral, as much of Europe is doing. We need more immigration, not less. And it should not take months--years!--to get approved to enter. At Ellis Island they processed thousands every day, and these were immigrants who did not apply ahead of time.

[/quote]

According to the Wikepedia article "Immigration to the United States":

As of 2006, the United States accepts more legal immigrants as permanent residents than all other countries in the world combined. Since the liberalization of immigration policy in 1965, the number of first- generation immigrants living in the United States has quadrupled, from 9.6 million in 1970 to about 38 million in 2007.

A record 1,046,539 persons were naturalized as U.S. citizens in 2008. The leading countries of birth of the new citizens were Mexico, India and the Philippines.

...

The peak year of European immigration was in 1907 when 1,285,349 persons entered the country.

...

Since 2000, legal immigrants to the United States number approximately 1,000,000 per year, of whom about 600,000 are Change of Status immigrants who already are in the U.S. Legal immigrants to the United States now are at their highest level ever at over 37,000,000 legal immigrants. Illegal immigration may be as high as 1,500,000 per year with a net of at least 700,000 illegal immigrants arriving each year to join the 12,000,000 to 20,000,000 that are already there. (Pew Hispanic Data Estimates) Immigration led to a 57.4% increase in foreign born population from 1990 to 2000.

From here (paraphrased):

The average number of Green Cards issued per year, over the last 20 years, was 1,001,715.

Those are only counting Green Cards (permanent residency). We also give out oodles of work or non-immigrant visas. We even have a Green Card lottery!

[quote="JimG, post:11, topic:203789"]
We do need to keep out criminals and drug dealers.

[/quote]

Illegal immigrants are criminals. That's why they're called illegals.

Just wanted to note that the drug traffickers often run people-smuggling operations. That's what drug traffickers are: smugglers. The illegal aliens arriving here often pay drug traffikers to bring them here. Drugs, people, weapons, money, counterfeit goods... it's all the same to them.

An interesting article. I'll read the whole thing. This part caught my eye also:
"In 2009, a study by the Cato Institute, a free market think tank, found that legalization of low-skilled illegal resident workers in the US would result in a net increase in US GDP of $180 billion over ten years.[92]"I think we'll need an increase in GDP to pay all those new taxes.

There are some cities in western Kansas--Garden City comes to mind--which would dry up and turn to ghost towns if it were not for immigrants. At the meat packing plant in Garden City, 14 languages are spoken--and yes, people are learning English. Without that labor force, the plant would simply not be there. There would be no paychecks and no taxes collected.

Immigration might not be needed if native Americans were having more children, but they aren't. And we can't grow with a below or barely replacement level reproductive rate.

The waves of immigration early in the 1900's were a boon to the economy of the nation. I hope the nation will not become so isolationist as to turn itself into an enclave while jobs and growth go elsewhere.

[quote="JimG, post:13, topic:203789"]
An interesting article. I'll read the whole thing. This part caught my eye also:
"In 2009, a study by the Cato Institute, a free market think tank, found that legalization of low-skilled illegal resident workers in the US would result in a net increase in US GDP of $180 billion over ten years.[92]"I think we'll need an increase in GDP to pay all those new taxes.

There are some cities in western Kansas--Garden City comes to mind--which would dry up and turn to ghost towns if it were not for immigrants. At the meat packing plant in Garden City, 14 languages are spoken--and yes, people are learning English. Without that labor force, the plant would simply not be there. There would be no paychecks and no taxes collected.

Immigration might not be needed if native Americans were having more children, but they aren't. And we can't grow with a below or barely replacement level reproductive rate.

The waves of immigration early in the 1900's were a boon to the economy of the nation. I hope the nation will not become so isolationist as to turn itself into an enclave while jobs and growth go elsewhere.

[/quote]

Why not just get to the root of the immigration problem and address the fact that the Mexican govornment is doing a terrible job govorning its nation... They cannot control the billion dollar drug cartels, and yet seem to WANT the borders open for some reason... Hmmm, sounds fishy.

Why not just make a deal. We'll open the borders completely if the Mexican govornment turns over its assets to the United States. We can call it South Mexico, and rename New Mexico to North Mexico.

That would solve the drug problem, and allow us to start commercializing new land. ;)

Most of Mexico can be used as wind and solar farms. They’ll build it for pennies.

Oh, and dont forget all the oil.

[quote="Darryl1958, post:10, topic:203789"]
You are responding to yet another typical response of the left who has been trained to decide from the heart rather than from the mind.

Reasoning did not play even the slightest role in the prose being quoted. I am sure his response was heartfelt, but the heart needs no reasons. As long as the heart is in the right place, for the typical leftist, that is all that matters.

The violent lawlessness, the exploitation of those 'poor and huddled masses', the great expense incurred by a society that is reeling from the expenses incurred by the massive illegal immigration, are of no concern to the heart that bleeds.

[/quote]

Actually, I'm about as far right as one can get.

Reasoning did, in fact, play into this prose being quoted.

Perhaps sheer emotion played a role in yours?

[quote="JimG, post:11, topic:203789"]
Thanks for the quote. Our country was essentially based on immigration.

One part of the solution to the immigration problem is to allow more immigration--much more--and make it faster process.

We are now a nation whose reproduction rate is verging on the brink of falling below the replacement level. Without immigration, we would start a depopulation spiral, as much of Europe is doing. We need more immigration, not less. And it should not take months--years!--to get approved to enter. At Ellis Island they processed thousands every day, and these were immigrants who did not apply ahead of time.

We do need to keep out criminals and drug dealers. We don't need to keep out everyone.

[/quote]

Ding! Ding! Ding! We have a winner!!!:thumbsup:

My dad is an immigrant.

He came here in 1964 on a work visa. When it ran out.. he went home, applied and a year later he was here. He took classes on our history and became an American.

His citizenship paper hangs on our family room wall. My mother has redecorated a zillion times but that certificate never moves.

We are all proud of it.

Come in the front door.. don't sneak in over the border and break our laws.

I have a story of my own, regarding immigration.

Last night I was talking with someone, who is furious about this whole immigration thing, and at one point turned to me and said that I was 'ignorant' and 'turning my back on not only my family, but my people' 'two faced' etc etc.

About a year and a half ago, I had two family members deported, one of which was my Grandma, who along took with her my Grandpa- the other was my Uncle, which resulted in my Aunt (his wife), and my two cousins having to leave with him.

By this persons understanding, since my family has been personally affected by this, I should be against this whole immigration thing, and what was absurd to them was, my family all immigrated here LEGALLY, so I should be even MORE outraged.

I explained that I am a first born American. I was born here. This is my home.

My family all immigrated here legally. My mom, went the whole way thru, really determined, and got her citizenship.

No one else went that extra step, they remained 'legal aliens' with visas, or green cards, whatever.

But my Uncle, when he was about 18, committed a crime, and served time for it. Well, years later, when this immigration stuff really hit the fan, it came back and to haunt him. The bottom line is, you break a law, you broke it. It didnt matter that he had lived a law abiding lifestyle...had a family, was working, he had broken a law, and that violated the terms of his immigration status.

Yes, he came here legally. 'Illegal immigration' wasnt his crime, but he DID commit one, and fair is only fair-

If I have to lose MY family members, my good hearted-respect giving, thats MY family- of course it hurt, but if I have to lose my family members because they broke a law, then I have NO sympathy for other immigrants who violate their immigration or come here and break laws. Its very objective. You break a law- and thats it. I'll be DAMNED if, these people arent even going to have the respect to come here LEGALLY, and think they have more rights than my relatives, or other Americans...you know what I mean? Thats just wrong.

So yes, I come from a family of immigrants and I fully support these laws. Laws are applicable to EVERYONE.

[quote="Stjudeprayforus, post:18, topic:203789"]
My dad is an immigrant.

He came here in 1964 on a work visa. When it ran out.. he went home, applied and a year later he was here. He took classes on our history and became an American.

His citizenship paper hangs on our family room wall. My mother has redecorated a zillion times but that certificate never moves.

We are all proud of it.

Come in the front door.. don't sneak in over the border and break our laws.

[/quote]

I agree wholeheartedly!

Unfortunately America is barricading the front door.:(

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