"The Cardinal", 1963 film

This 1963 film with Tom Tryon as a young Irish American priest, Father Stephen Fermoyle, and his long rise throughout the Church’s ranks until he receives his Red Hat (as a Cardinal), is almost an elegy, inas much as it deals with still topical issues as racism/anti-Semitism, birth control, the rise of Nazism , reminiscent of a now vanished Catholic world( Fish on Fridays, Latin Masses, no salvation outside the Church). Anybody else think as I do?

Terry

Fish on Friday is not vanished here in the UK where the discipline of not eating meat on Friday was restored recently.

NOWHERE in the Catholic world does it say you must eat fish on Friday.Some geographical . cal areas have reintroduced MEATLESS Fridays ,big difference

Absolutely, which is what I said above. The reality is although you have to abstain from meat and you can eat a wide range of other things it was customary to pick fish quite often.

True. But please remember that universal canon law requires all Fridays to be meatless. It is regional Episcopal Conferences which have decreed that some other penance can be substituted and meat can be eaten on Fridays outside of Lent. Small difference, but it counts.

This 1963 film with Tom Tryon as a young Irish American priest, Father Stephen Fermoyle, and his long rise throughout the Church’s ranks until he receives his Red Hat (as a Cardinal), is almost an elegy, inas much as it deals with still topical issues as racism/anti-Semitism, birth control, the rise of Nazism , reminiscent of a now vanished Catholic world( Fish on Fridays, Latin Masses, no salvation outside the Church). Anybody else think as I do?

Terry

I will not add to the raging controversy about fish on Friday, introduced by our English friend. ( who said he was going to put me on his ignore list. :popcorn: )

I read the book as well as seeing the movie.
The book’s author was a great admirer of Cardinal Spellman of New York. Earlier, he had been Archbishop of Boston. People have said the author wrote the book as a tribute to Cardinal Spellman’s career, but I see no parallels. Spellman was in Italy for a time but not Germany. Nor, as far as I can see, was he in the South where the character in the book got whipped by the KKK. These were all inventions.

The book writer’s purpose was to make note of the difficulties of being a Catholic priest. For example, the priest’s own sister becomes pregnant outside of marriage and when she is in labor the doctor says he must do an abortion to save her life. Father “Steve” says that’s murder and refuses to permit it. His sister dies.

Other situations in the story also explore moral dilemnas.

Taken all together, it’s unbelievable that a single priest would have all these experiences, but this was in the early 60s, and melodrama had a stronger audience. People weren’t as jaded as they are now, having seen everything before they’re out of high school.

Now as for the fish…:smiley:

Not! :whackadoo: :takeoff:

There are dozens of good Catholic movies from that period.

Hey let’s not turn this thread into a meatless Fridays debate, okay? Please?

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