The danger to Western Christians doesn't come from sword-and-sandals tyrants, but from a new code of etiquette


#1

Are Catholics too polite?
#2

Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the schemes of the devil. -Eph 6:10-11


#3

I so agree with this. I wish I knew how to counter it.


#4

We need to just shut up or get fired. Sadly. Kids gotta eat!


#5

I wear my visible St. Michael medal and my Catholic high school hat or shirts to work all the time. If somebody doesn’t like it, that’s their problem.


#6

Unless your boss fires you. Good luck proving religious discrimination.


#8

I have many employers. Not too worried, but thanks.


#9

I agree with you: Robertson was not the best example to use. However, I agree with the point the author is trying to make.


#10

I’ve never feared speaking about my Catholic beliefs, even at my current company, which some seem to think is the poster child of SJW policies run amok. Sure, I’m not standing on my desk telling all those with gray pride flags to repent or burn in hell, but I feel comfortable enough talking about my beliefs in the right situation. There’s also some active Christian groups, though I haven’t really been able to do anything with them.


#11

As long as it’s allowed in your company’s dress code, go for it!

In the hospital where I work (and in most hospitals and clinics), clothing cannot have any kind of message (including support for sports teams) except on occasional days (e.g., when the Cubs were playing the World Series, or on Women’s Heart Health Day) when all of us are encouraged to wear supportive apparel.

I think it’s important to follow company dress codes and other rules that do not directly violate our Christian faith.


#12

This is an interesting read (for those of us who are in the US):
https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/qa_religious_garb_grooming.cfm


#13

Maybe I’m lucky, but I’ve never had a religious debate break out at work. I couldn’t tell you what the religious beliefs of any of my coworkers are.

Most people just want to do their job, chat for a few minutes about mundane stuff over lunch, and go home.


#14

I also thought Brian McCall wasn’t a very compelling example. He’s written that women should never wear pants, and if an activity would require that, then they should not participate in it. He does not support the idea of women working, nor necessarily of voting. While his academic position is protected, I wouldn’t call it persecution to say he should not be in authority in a public institution that is preparing women for professional lives.


#15

For the most part, I think people see being Catholic as a kind of curiosity; it’s only when some serious Catholicism comes out that suddenly everyone goes silent in that shunning sort of way.


#16

This is one advantage to being retired. There are other advantages, but this is a big one. For those of you who still have to earn a living, keep a watch on your six.

D


#17

Some don’t seem to understand how bad it is when you lose a job, be it a layoff or unjust firing. The former is quite bad on its own, so with the latter, that’s really bad.


#18

The article cited above points to our own attitudes more than those of our employers. Example:
"If any Christian in the West says that the Church there faces persecution, one of his co-religionists is sure to accuse him of overstating the case. "

There are plenty of well meaning Christians all to willing to defend the rights of Buddhists, vegans, witches, animals or icebergs, but not so much when it comes to defending the persecuted Christians. Why is that, I wonder.


#19

Because Christianity was being persecuted right from the start so we should expect it and it’s in the Bible. Some take it further. For some, the standard is it has to be violent. But what they don’t realise is losing your job unjustly is wrong too. It’s not the equivalent of being thrown to the lions but it’s still wrong. Persecution isn’t solely about violence.

There’s also this idea that if we become doormats, everyone will like us. If only that were the case.


#21

Persecution requires an element of hostility or ill-treatment.

Some conflate events with persecution. An example would Happy Holidays instead of Merry Christmas. That’s not hostile or ill-treatment. There’s a boy-cries-wolf effect when some people do this. So when real hostility like the state of Colorado or activists hounding bakers who don’t want to materially support gay “marriages” or forcing religious institutions to carry out abortions or assisted suicides, some will shrug.


#22

How about this, a Traveller, here is some more real persecution for you:


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