The Demon amongst the Twelve

It is very explicit from the gospel of John 6:70: "Did I not choose the twelve of you myself? Yet one of you is a devil!” It is a categorical admission that one of the privileged dozen was the demon in disguise. He frontally addressed one of them “Satan”. (Mark 8:33) Who was he? Go over the following article at relijournal.com/christianity/satan-the-foremost-apostle/ before you answer. You could be wrong you know.

:confused: Don’t you just love when people read words, but not lines or paragraphs? Sigh.

I’m sorry, maybe I’m just brain-dead today. Why did a catholic post this?? :confused:

I wonder if this person who takes Christ so literally, saying,

Every utterance that comes out of the holy lips of the Son of Man is the truth and nothing but the truth. No believer of the Son of Man will contest that.

and

The Lord’s revelation was not a riddle or a figure of speech or a joke. He was emphatic.

also takes him literally when He said, “This is my body.” Think I’ll go ask him that very question in the comments on his blog.

Are you sure you are Catholic?! That piece was rubbish!

oinesra0211,
Enough, you’ve had one drink too many, you naughty boy :rolleyes:

Why as a Catholic do you think this person is right? :confused:

If you read the very next verse, John 6:71, it says, (He meant Judas, the son of Simon Iscariot, who, though one of the Twelve, was later to betray him.)" That blogger claims to know better than St. John what the verse means. :rolleyes:

Judas is a called a demon, Peter is called Satan, because those human beings are being conflated with the powers at work through them; not because those humans are in their own persons demons.

This sort of conflation is usual in NT thinking, & is a not confined to it - it’s characteristic of apocalyptic thinking to see things in this world as in some sense “masks” for the activity of superhuman powers. Peter is called Satan because his words repeated one of the temptations; Judas is called a demon because his action has the same character. In a similar way, the angels of the seven churches in Revelation 2-3 seem to be conflated with human bishops: the angels are addressed, because of the conditions of the churches which they are supposed to protect.

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