The false belief that religions are more or less equal


#1

My mom said something that really irritates me. She used to be Lutheran, became Catholic, and has fallen into what I would consider apostasy (she claims faith in Christ, but doesn’t believe that those who deny Christ and are yet good people will go to hell. In other words, she does not believe in what is both in Scripture and in the New Testament.) Anyhow, my sister apostasized the Catholic faith about two years ago. She joined some fundamentalist group. At the same time I have been reading more and more of the Bible and of Christian history. Suprise! Suprise! I discovered that Catholicism (or at least Orthodoxy) has remained unchanged in its core beliefs and practices since Christ founded the Church on Peter.

Ok, so this is what my mom told me. She told me that she is glad that my sister and I have both found comfort in our religious beliefs. In other words, she sees a religion as on par with a social club. It doesn’t matter if the church to which you belong is the one and only Church; so long as it makes you feel better, I’m happy, is what she seems to be saying.

I wouldn’t mind this personal incident; but it seems to be a common problem growing in this country. I think that the constantly splitting nature of Protestantism, and each Protestant church’s need to advertise their church with special effects, is to blame. Until just recently in this century one was a Lutheran, an Anglican, a Baptist, a Presbyterian, etc. primarily because one believed in what that group taught. I’m sure that most of the people who switched churches did so because they truly believed that the church to which they switched was better representative of what Christ and the apostles taught.

However, in our present age, it seems that people jump around in Protestant churches because of the ambience rather than doctrine. The Lutheran or Presbyterian liturgy is too archaic for many; so they join some Evangelical Free church which features Christian rock bands every Sunday. Unfortunately I believe that, as more and more Christians join these stimulating churches, the more and more these Christians will lose the central beliefs of Christianity, which thank God we Catholics review every time we go to Mass. Unfortunately, many Catholics, along with more traditional Protestants, are being attracted to these spectacular services.

What do other people think about these more spectacular services? Do you see them as a danger to present and future Catholic youth? Will future Catholics see the Mass as too “boring” compared to these more modern services?


#2

Keep on reading. Try to tune in to EWTN on TV. Read this Forum and then set aside a special time each day to pray, even if you don’t have a feeling that you want to pray. Ask the Holy Spirit to help you to pray. Even if it is just 5 minutes a day to start. It WILL grow on you! I say the same nightly prayers every night with small exceptions. But …pray.

You seem to have some adult attitudes, Catholic attitudes, keep it up and you will be happier than the silly ones who are running with the wind. It will pay off later. Thank you.
JMJ
Bill


#3

Here is an answer from St Mike Forum

Quote

saint-mike.org/qa/sw/ViewAnswer.asp?QID=81

Are All Religions the Same
George
Wednesday, July 28, 2004

Question:

Is making the statement that religions are the same correct? “many paths but we all worship the same god”

Is this what is meant when Pope John Paul II talks about religious dialogue?

As Catholics are we suppose to believe that all religions are worshipping the same god.

In addition, this system of kempo implied that when you free yourself from conflict “opinion and prejudice” then you will obtain happiness. I thought as Christians, the fact that you are Christian, puts you in conflict with the rest of the world.

I posted the question above about the martial arts group. The kempo group I was involved with made this implication.


Question Answered by Bro. Ignatius Mary, OLSM+

Dear George:

I took the liberty of changing the title of your question since your question really has nothing to do with marital arts but with the question of whether all Religions are the same.

The answer to your questions are:

  1. No, not all religions are the same. Not all religions worship the same God. Religions are not all on equal ground. The Church teaches that we might find some grain of truth in all religions to which we can agree with them and fellowship upon, but the Church does not say that all religions are equal or as good as any other.

  2. No, this idea of all religions as good as another is NOT what the Pope is saying or teaching. Rather, the Pope is doing what Christ mandated – going to all the world to preach the Gospel. In doing that the Pope recognizes the dignity of all persons. He recognizes that all people are children of God, even if they have travelled down the wrong road and have an erroneous understanding of God.

The common dignity of man and the common reality that we are all God’s children should lead us to dialogue (not necessarily agreement, but a dialogue). This dialogue is efficacious in the common goals of world peace, feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, promoting justice and respect of all persons, etc.

This dialogue the Pope speaks about does NOT compromise the Revealed Truth of God entrusted to the Catholic Church even one iota. He dialogues with fellow travelers on this planet; he never compromises the Truth of the Catholic Faith.

  1. No, we are not expected to believe that all religions worship the same God. Some religions worship the devil, others worship creation instead of the creator. and still others worship idols. The world’s religions do not all worship the same God; but…

… the world’s religions were created as a primitive attempt to try to understand God. The problem is that most of the religions did not have the advantage that Jews and Christians had – that of God revealing Himself to us through the prophets and through Sacred Scriptures and Tradition.

Since the various ancient religions did not have this guidance that we had, they did the best they could. Understanding this point is not depreciating the Truth of Christianity at all, it is merely understanding a historical fact.

The Kempo philosophy is that of the Eastern Philosophies and illustrates the danger of the marital arts. We do not find happiness through the lack of conflict or the freedom from opinion and prejudice. First off, that is not possible in this life. NO ONE is free from conflict and opinion, or even prejudice in this life.

Second, happiness comes only from knowing and loving God and loving one’s neighbor has themselves and all that this implies.

God Bless,
Bro. Ignatius Mary

End Quote


#4

First of all, Catholics drove me away from Mass and non-Catholic Christians brought me back. When I went to college and no longer lived with my parents, that was it. I quit going to Mass except for a while when I went to Mass because certain girls talked me into going. When I moved to Wichita in 1981 as a 22-year old, single, electrical engineer, I had no use for going to Mass at all.

When I was about 25, I started watching Fred Price, a black “non-denominational” TV preacher from Los Angeles. He was preaching from the Bible about how faith works, and was the first human being who made any sense to me on that issue. Lord knows many had tried to convince me, mostly by telling me I had to “quit trying to think about it” and just believe. I bought a Bible and started following along with his sermons and my life got better. He taught practical lessons on how to apply scripture readings to my own life, such as how to get over past sins and failures and accept forgiveness from the Lord. Gradually I became to believe that the Bible contained wisdom far beyond any book written by a human author, and professed my faith in God and Jesus right along with Fred Price. :gopray:

Soon after that I met the Catholic lady who is now my wife, and I decided to start going to Mass again to see what it was about. Even though it was clearly different than listening to Fred Price I stayed with it, partly because a Baptist secretary at work told me that Catholicism as a denomination is traceable to Peter and her denomination and others are branches off of it. :yup:

When it came time to consider getting married I got a monthly bulletin from Fred Price with a great article about praying to God for a spouse. I said the prayers, and a few weeks later the Lord showed me that Julie was the one. Now we are active Catholics with one child who has gone to Catholic school K-12 and five others still in Catholic school 1-12, and all of us go to Mass every Sunday, often more than one Mass as I play organ at two churches and my children often cantor, sing in the honor choir, play violins every couple months for a communion meditation, and/or serve Mass and my wife lectors.

I get pretty weary from listening to Catholics put down non-Catholics because they are not the “true” religion. We truly are one in the body of Christ even though we might be from different folds. I would have no faith life, no Catholicism, probably no wife and children – at least not as happy as we are – had it not been for non-Catholic Christians and even the influence of some non-Christians and even one atheist who helped me build my faith. Catholics did not leave the “other 99” sheep and come after me, the lost one. It was non-Catholics who brought me back to God and set me up to have an open heart when I finally met a wonderful Catholic lady to be my wife. BTW, I met her at the Red Cross as I was donating blood; she was the phlebotomist drawing my blood. (Only a few days before, she personally had “stuck” the bishop! :eek: )

(continued)


#5

Catholics who tell non-Catholics they are wrong in their worship remind me of the apostles when they told Jesus they tried to stop some people from driving out demons in His name because they weren’t “with” us. (Mark 9:38-41,Luke 9:50) Also when I came back to Catholic Church I thought I knew better than some here, until I read from Paul that if we think we know something then we don’t know as we should know; (1 Cor 8:1-3) that cut down my pride to allow me to assimilate back into the Church. I can’t remember where, but Paul also said something about not second-guessing others’ motives in worship because for all I know they do what they do out of faith. I started accepting others in the Church, and I now call on Catholics to take the same attitude toward others outside the Church. What they do, they do out of faith and they might be just as pleasing to God, if not more, than Catholics who speak all sorts of textbook wisdom but have no tolerance for non-Catholics, their beliefs or their practices. :love:

The body of Christ is not dismembered because there are different folds and different professed shepherds; it is dismembered because of intolerance we Christians have of one another, whether they be inside or outside of the Church. :tsktsk:

In direct response to the thread title, no, religions are not equal. However, I voted no danger, although some may leave Mass for other services. When they do, I wonder if they simply aren’t being led correctly in Catholicism and going to Mass is meaningless for them anyway, so who knows but the Spirit could be using those other services to rekindle their interest in God and Christ. :bible1:

OK, getting off soapbox now, at least for the moment! :slight_smile:

Alan


#6

okay stand back because as soon as I speak my piece this thread is going to be overtaken by people with very passionate views on the liturgy.

anyone who goes to Mass looking for a comfortable, enriching, self-satisfying experience, for emotional satisfaction, to feel good about himself, to receive approbation for his sensibilities and opinions, to leave with the same level of self-esteem as when he entered, to hear good music, to hear a stimulating sermon, or even for the spiritual consolation, the warm fuzzy feeling after communion that Jesus is with me, is going for the wrong reasons.

If you are there to be the liturgy police, and your experience is going to be disturbed by every aberration, or if you are there because it will be in your language, whether English, Latin, Spanish or whatever, you are going for the wrong reason. If you choose your parish because you agree with the political and doctrinal opinions of the pastor, whether he is liberal, dissenting, conservative or orthodox, you are going for the wrong reason. If you choose your parish, other than your geographical, ritual or ethnic parish, because you want to be around other people just like you, you are going for the wrong reason. If you choose your parish because of their outreach activities, children’s programs, adult education, charitable works, you are going for the wrong reason.

If you are going to Mass because it is a custom, rather than going because it is a duty you owe to God and his people in justice and charity, you are going for the wrong reason.

Every Mass, everywhere in the world, as long as the minimal requirements for validity and licitness are observed, no matter how sinful the priest, no matter how unlike your perception of “good Catholic” are members of the congregation, is a participation in the Paschal Mystery, your presence in a real way as witness to the incarnation, life, suffering, death, resurrection and ascension of Jesus to heaven. It is your participation in the heavenly banquet, the wedding feast of the Lamb.

Your feelings and emotional reaction, your spiritual consolations, what you “get out of it” are immaterial. The gifts you receive are so deep and so real that they are beyond your conscious perception. Do not sell short the real experience for the sense experience. Approach every Mass you attend as a participant, not as a theatrical critic or as a bystander. listen for the Word the Holy Spirit wishes to speak to you through the incompetent lectors, the distracted, tempted priest, the inspired readings, the prayers that hold the richness and fullness of our Catholic beliefs.

Be there. Bring yourself, your entire self, your thoughts, preferences, desires, sins, guilt, suffering, joy, trials and offer it up on the altar united with the perfect sacrifice of Jesus Christ. Open your heart to his healing and gifts. Receive him, if you are able, in holy communion, reverently, expectently, hopefully, faithfully with a heart full of love, and let him fill you in turn with perfect love. Let him draw you into communion with him, and with all the imperfect beings he has called together to be his church. If you are barred at this time from receiving him physically, ask him to spiritually draw you into this communion. You may not, indead probably will not experience in a sensible, intellectual or emotional way the joy of this communion, but if you ask for it and intend it, it will happen nonetheless.

Be there. And when you leave, he goes with you. Take him out into the world with you, wherever you go, to whoever you meet and be a witness to the reality of Christ with us, uniting all your work and leisure and human encounters to his saving work.


#7

Dear puzzleannie,

Well Said! :thumbsup:

Bravo! :clapping:

:amen:

Alan


#8

does it make any difference which christian denomination i join?[size=3] although it is very clear in scripture and early church history that christ left only one church,today we have over 33,000 christian denominations. does it matter which of these you join? it most certainly does! if christ founded only one church, then all the others christian churches were foundedby men. although they believe much that it is true, and have many members who are sicere christians, we simply cannot choose any of them over the church founded by christ.:blessyou: [/size]


#9

‘I would have no faith life, no Catholicism, probably no wife and children – at least not as happy as we are – had it not been for non-Catholic Christians and even the influence of some non-Christians and even one atheist who helped me build my faith.’

alan from wichita said. i like alan. his posts are interesting. i do take issue with this bit, though.

alan seems to be saying that catholics should stop insisting that their church is right and the others are wrong, and we should all just get along. i’d point out that, even in his own example, an atheist helped him build his faith. obviously the atheist is wrong about a few things (the most important one), and so are some churches.

while it IS important for all of us to love each other, whether brothers in Christ, or enemies of Christ, it is also important to learn from, and worship in, a church that teaches truth. if this church teaches one thing (that Jesus is present in the eucharist) and that church teaches the opposite (He isn’t), one of them is wrong. both groups should love one another, and both should seek God’s face and walk with Him.

so no, not all religious groups are equal. not all Christian groups are equal. is there danger in heresy? sure. should we then hate and destroy heretics? no. we are commanded to love even our enemies, to pray for those who harm us.

it’s a good thing, too, cuz 20 years from now you may find yourself on the other side of the line. :slight_smile:


#10

Well we all agree (I think) that religions aren’t equal in the sense that “one is as good as another.” Otherwise it would be much better to make up some minimalist religion and just believe that Jesus died for you so we’ll all automatically go to Heaven, where we’ll all be equally happy regardless of the lives we lived, so we might as well simply work for fairness and otherwise “do what feels good” here on Earth.

Oh, wait-- that’s mainline Protestantism.

Anyway, to comment on the poll: one of the central ideas of both Protestantism and American democracy is that “no one can tell me what to think.” That is to say, everyone’s religious, moral and political ideas are equally ‘right,’ regardless of their logical consistency or their conformity or non-conformity to human experience. The problem is that this effectively drops the requirement that religion make sense, and turns faith into a matter of finding something that “speaks to me–” that gives me an emotional high. Rock bands and colorful preaching are a cheap way to get this high, and I think that’s why they’re attracting so many churchgoers. The end result: worship has become entertainment, and serving God has morphed into feeling happy, all because we no longer have a way to evaluate either of them except by how they make individuals feel.

One more thing. Annie describes so beautifully how the Mass brings us into the great mystery and romance of God’s saving love for His people. How can this not effect people emotionally unless they don’t really understand it? Obviously, there’s a lot of Good News to be shared.


#11

[quote=patricius]Well we all agree (I think) that religions aren’t equal in the sense that “one is as good as another.”
[/quote]

Hmm - imagine I’m a rational alien. (Well actually I am as far as you are concerned :smiley: )… I meet knowledgeable and devout Catholics who explain why they believe that their faith represents the high truth. They say (smugly?) 'all religions aren’t equal because one is true (the Catholic religion - or at least my particular branch of Catholicism). But then I meet other Catholics (ultra-conservative, liberal, intellectual, Jesuitical [my personal favourite] , charismatic, liberational), Protestants (Episcopal liberal, Episcopal African, Anglo-catholic, Methodist, Baptist, white fundamentalist, black fundamentalist), Seventh Day Adventist, Mormon, Quaker, Sunni muslim, Shiite Muslim, Indian Buddhist, Nepalese Buddhist, Chinese Buddhist, Sikh, many different Jewish groups, haitian voodoo, West Indian obeah, animism, countless African and Polynesian beliefs, Chinese Confucianism, Taoism, Japanese Shinto, da-da etc etc - you get the idea). Each and every one of the people, that I as a rational alien meet, believes, with total conviction and confidence, that his religious beliefs are true. Each is utterly convnced that her belief represents the ultimate truth and that all the others are ‘superstition’, ‘error’, ‘heresy’. (Except there are a few, who whilst holding to their own faith acknowledge other paths, in charity, love and understanding, but they are few, very few).

So, here I am, a rational alien on this earth and hundreds of people have grasped me by the buttonhole of my alien cybersuit and with all conviction have said to me ‘mine is the way, the truth and the light - others are mistaken, or evil, or damned, or pitiable’.

My question is this - in all this maze of belief and disagreement, how do I as a rational alien, unburdened with the bias of being born into this faith or that, come to the conclusion that any one of these deeply held convictions should hold sway over all the others. What are the criteria that I should apply, and in applying these criteria, why should I come to the conclusion that the mainstream version of Catholic belief represents truth and all others are mistaken? Why?

Alec
homepage.ntlworld.com/macandrew/Grenada_disaster/Grenada_disaster.htm


#12

Dear hecd2,

That’s easy.

You may safely believe anything I tell you is true. I know because if I was wrong, I’d change my mind. If I’m not sure or am quoting an authority I would not stake my own credibility on then I’ll qualify my statements. You can completely trust me because I am honest almost all the time. Besides, people who think they know everything annoy the few of us who actually do!

Alan


#13

[quote=AlanFromWichita]Dear hecd2,

That’s easy.

You may safely believe anything I tell you is true. I know because if I was wrong, I’d change my mind. If I’m not sure or am quoting an authority I would not stake my own credibility on then I’ll qualify my statements. You can completely trust me because I am honest almost all the time. Besides, people who think they know everything annoy the few of us who actually do!

Alan
[/quote]

Aha! OK that’ll be it. You won’t mind if I hope for a fuller rationale for why Catholisism (or at least the particular brand that you adhere to) represents the crritical and only grand truth?

Alec
evolutionpages.com


#14

Indifferentism is a sin.

This is only logical because it would be like saying that Christ, who died for our sins and rose again and who is King of Heaven and earth is the equal of the Buddha, a mere man - if he ever even really existed.

www.newadvent.org has the old catholic encyclopedia. It may have an article on indifferentism, which is really just a variant of modernism, historicism, and relativism.

We are moral absolutists. We are not subjective about certain teachings of faith and morals because Christ did not say come follow me…or any other person claiming to be the messiah.

That is our choice as xians.


#15

Alec,

Suppose I, as a rational adult, walk into a room of children. Upon entering, a fairly large group – in fact, the largest group (let’s call it Group A) – walks up to me and explains that Tommy (pointing to the crying child in the corner) has just had his Blue Power Ranger stolen by Billy; Billy, in turn, has added the Blue Power Ranger to his Power Ranger collection and run off home to play with said Power Ranger collection.

My first instinct, naturally, would be to find this Billy character and get to the bottom of the story. Of course, I can’t do that.

Now suppose that I walk further into this roomful of children and other, smaller groups of children start coming up to me (Group B’s) purporting that, yes, the playground bully, Billy, has stolen Tommy’s Blue Power Ranger.

Well, I’d at least consider that there might be something to the story.

However, upon venturing further into the room, I meet other groups of children (Group C’s), some smaller and some larger, each claiming various things. Among these: Billy took the Blue Power Ranger that was rightfully his, because Tommy stole it two days ago; it was not Billy but Bobby who took not Tommy but Timmy’s Blue Power Ranger; Tommy just pretended Billy stole his Blue Power Ranger to get some attention; Tommy’s Blue Power Ranger was also Billy’s Blue Power Ranger because all Power Rangers belong to all people; there is no such thing as a Blue Power Ranger, thus Billy could never steal it; etc.

This would certainly complicate the situation.

Trying to regain my bearings, I’d return to the groups of people to whom I was talking earlier; together, Groups A and B make up a decent majority of the room. However, the smaller groups of people (B’s) would start changing their position: It was the Purple-ish, Blue-ish Power Ranger that was stolen; Billy didn’t so much steal as “liberate” Tommy’s Blue Power Ranger; etc. Now trying to take all this into account, I suddenly see Group B’s approaching the largest group of kids with whom I first made contact, Group A. As I observe, to my horror, several of the Group A children seem to be persuaded to join Group B’s; and still others, looks of doubt on their faces, go off and form their own random groups with yet slightly different stories!

By this time I’m wondering how I’m ever going to get a straight story about which Power Ranger was stolen and by whom. So, I get some coffee and decide to let things in the room cool down for a few hours. Returning later that day, I observe the same general series of Groups; the numbers have changed around somewhat, there are more “random” groups, and Group A is still the largest. Deciding that I have to start somewhere (yes, I really care about Tommy’s well-being in light of the Power Ranger theft), I head over to the Group A’s again.

Their story is surprisingly consistent.

I head over to the Group B’s. After talking for a while I realize that, if I’m to do this whole thing fairly, I now have to make room for the assertions that Power Ranger is symbolic for “lunch money,” that Timmy is a girl and would never play with power rangers, that Billy is a ghost and I’ll never catch him, etc. Yes, the Group B’s seem to have come up with more “recollections” even than before, and while a few are fairly consistent, most aren’t.

After briefly considering that it might be easy to just believe the Group C’s, who don’t know what a Power Ranger is and don’t care, but rather like to think that if they all sit down and think hard enough about some singular idea, they can show me the underlying Ranger Power mysteriously guiding my actions, I return to my senses as I glance over to Tommy still crying in the corner.


#16

Having made up my mind that I’m going to get this boy’s Blue Power Ranger back if indeed his Power Ranger was stolen, if indeed it was Blue, and (oh dear) if indeed he is a boy, I cross my arms, step back, look around the room, and decide that maybe I should simply accept the majority and consistent belief of Group A because it somehow seems “right.” Now being a man of logic and incredulity, the moment this idea pops into my head, I instantly wonder:

“What are the criteria that I should apply, and in applying these criteria, why should I come to the conclusion that the mainstream version of the Power Ranger theft represents truth and all others are mistaken? Why?”

I take a seat at the edge of the sandbox and contemplate. Time passes. The effects of the coffee wear off. I suppress the urge to urinate.

The next morning, I wonder what I’m doing face-down in a sandbox. As I slowly recall what occurred the day before, I find my thoughts racing once again. Deciding that a Power Ranger – if there are in fact Power Rangers – is not such a big deal, I head for the door. As my hand reaches for the knob, the door swings back and there stands some fat kid with stained shirt and a “Billy” name tag holding an undeniably wrestled-over Blue Power Ranger.

Then I tell myself (smugly?) that next time I have to deal with a Power Ranger theft, remember that all groups stories “aren’t equal in the sense that ‘one is as good as another.’" :slight_smile:


#17

Hi Alec,

Funny you should ask this same question I have asked myself. Why should people believe we (Catholics) have the true religion? I came to this conclusion after reviewing many of the religions you stated, so that I would at least know what they stood for, what were their foundations, etc. ONE TRUTH was evident, but revealed in several ways.

  1. There is only One God. This Truth is attainable if you need to discern it, such as the Greek philosphers did.

  2. He communicated with His creatures through the Word and the Holy Spirit in the written word of the Bible. These Truths are evident in the the written word. IF you need to study them, you can find it yourself or you can believe it as told to you by others of more learning, just as we believe that there are atoms in all things, things we common people have never seen but believe.

  3. The religion Judaism was instituted by God to His creatures for mankind’s redemption.

  4. He sent His Only Son to redeem His creatures.

  5. His Son, His Only Son instituted a church. I repeat. A , singular, church. He walked, talked, taught by word, by example and by His presence, His disciples and His apostles. These things He gave to them were truths which reveal ONE TRUTH , which is He.

  6. Thus, only two religions were instituted by God.One was fulfilled by Christ and the other is the Catholic Church.

If your desire is true and you seek the TRUTH, you will find it. They (the pollsters) claim there are over 33,000 christian denomination. I challenge any real seeker of TRUTH, to see if the church you practice your faith at can be traced back to a man or a group of men, at which point, ask WHEN in time was it? If somehow you find that your historical search doesn’t leads you back directly to Jesus Christ, then you may want to evaluate YOUR faith. Are you following a false shepherd because maybe a hundred twenty years ago your great-great grandfather got ticked off at the priest who had strayed from the path, THE WAY and decided he was going to fix it himself or other reasons. The Catholic Church is the only one which can do that. It is the only one that has kept ALL the truths revealed by the Son.

With humility, I submit this,

Jennifer


#18

[quote=hecd2]Aha! OK that’ll be it. You won’t mind if I hope for a fuller rationale for why Catholisism (or at least the particular brand that you adhere to) represents the crritical and only grand truth?
[/quote]

Not at all. I’m in favor of your having hope! :slight_smile:

Alan


#19

[quote=Alterum]However, upon venturing further into the room, I meet other groups of children (Group C’s), some smaller and some larger, each claiming various things. Among these: Billy took the Blue Power Ranger that was rightfully his, because Tommy stole it two days ago; it was not Billy but Bobby who took not Tommy but Timmy’s Blue Power Ranger; Tommy just pretended Billy stole his Blue Power Ranger to get some attention; Tommy’s Blue Power Ranger was also Billy’s Blue Power Ranger because all Power Rangers belong to all people; there is no such thing as a Blue Power Ranger, thus Billy could never steal it; etc.
[/quote]

Wow! I love it! God Bless you Alterum! for your sense of humor and wisdom. I haven’t laughed like this for a while. I tend to get too serious. So it allows me to really appreciate a well planned humorous analogy!

Jennifer


#20

Maybe we are like a pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey game.

We are blindfolded, to represent the fact that we must walk by faith, not by sight. (2 Cor 5:7)

Jesus hands Peter a set of keys and says, “go for it Peter, and let the force be with you. When you get to the donkey’s rear, use these keys to unlock the door and get the secret treasure. I’ll point you in the right direction.” (Matt 16:18)

Peter walks until he dies. Fascinated bystanders wonder what they should do. “I know, let’s elect one among ourselves to take the keys and keep walking and we will all follow him until he dies.”

This relay keeps up for hundreds of years, and some of the bystanders start questioning whether we are even going the right direction. The wind is blowing from the west, they say; that means we should turn to the east. Others say we should turn to the west. At one point, there were two men blindfolded and a lot of people weren’t sure who even had the keys.

Finally the largest majority agreed on who had the keys, although by now there were all sorts of splinter groups and lots of people with blindfolds, each walking by faith, but in a slightly different direction. Each had a group of followers, believing that their leader held the true keys, or at least good copies of the keys.

I’m boring myself with this story. That’s pretty sad. Guess I’d better quit now.

Alan


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